A Conversation About Plaque

Arianna Marsden, RDH

A Conversation About Plaque

Has your hygienist ever recommended that you brush twice daily?  I made this recommendation to a patient recently, and he informed me that because he brushed his teeth at night, he did not need to brush his teeth in the morning.  This patient asked me, “why would I need to brush my teeth in the morning?  I didn’t eat anything while I was sleeping, so my teeth are still clean.”

It became apparent to me that this patient had a misunderstanding of how plaque develops on his teeth, and I think that other people may have the same misconception about how plaque forms.  This patient and I were able to have an educational conversation about how plaque develops, and my patient was surprised to learn something new at the dentist.

So, first of all, what is plaque?  Plaque is the white, fuzzy stuff you feel on your teeth after not cleaning your teeth for a while.  This plaque is filled with bacteria that cause gum disease and cavities.  Seconds after a cleaning, whether from your hygienist or from brushing your own teeth, the plaque starts to come back.  It begins as a protein layer of slime that our mouths produce naturally, called the acquired pellicle.  Bacteria that are always present in our mouths bind to this pellicle and begin to colonize.  When bacteria colonize, they bind together into a film that you can see and feel on our teeth; the white fuzzy stuff we call plaque.  This plaque will form whether or not food is eaten.   It’s important to remove plaque about once every 12 hours, or twice per day, to help reduce the amount of bacteria present in our mouths, and to prevent cavities and gum disease.

During my conversation with my patient about how plaque is formed, we speculated about why he might have had a misunderstanding about plaque.  He asked me, “I thought you were supposed to brush after eating, because the food makes the plaque and the plaque gives you cavities.”  Part of this is true; brushing after meals does help to prevent cavities, but not for the reasons he initially thought.  The plaque that is already present uses the sugars in the foods we eat, and produces an acid, which is what causes the cavities.  By brushing after we eat, we remove the plaque so it doesn’t have the opportunity to produce acid; we also neutralize any acid that may have already been produced, thus preventing cavities.  We also discussed that removing, or disrupting plaque about once every twelve hours prevents the colonized plaque from mineralizing into calculus.  Calculus is the hard stuff that gets stuck on your teeth that you can’t brush off; it most commonly develops on the tongue side of lower front teeth.  This calculus, and the embedded bacteria, are one of the main causes of gum disease.  Calculus can’t be removed with a toothbrush, so it’s important to see your hygienist regularly for professional cleanings to remove the calculus deposits which have formed.

When my patient understood why brushing more than once per day would benefit his oral health, he expressed that he would consider brushing twice daily, and we would observe the results of his efforts at his next cleaning appointment.  Often times understanding why we do something is half the battle.

Sources:
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AZ Mission of Mercy

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Andra Mahoney, BS RDH

AZ Mission of Mercy

Next month, Decemeber 11th-12th, our offices will be going down to the AZ State Fairgrounds in Phoenix and volunteer again at the 4th Annual AZ Mission of Mercy.

“Since 1994, Mission of Mercy has been providing free healthcare, free dental care, and free prescription medications to the uninsured, under-insured, and those who “fall through the cracks” of our healthcare system.

An independent nonprofit 501 (c)(3), faith-based community organization, Mission of Mercy receives no government funding. Because of this, we can provide healthcare without any pre-qualifications. None of our patients must prove their poverty or residency.

Founded in 1991 and launched in 1994 by clinical pharmacist, Gianna Talone Sullivan, Pharm D., headquartered in Pennsylvania and serving clinics in Arizona, Maryland, Pennsylvania and Texas, Mission of Mercy now has 17 clinics providing more than 25,000 free patient visits each year.”

Here are some pictures of when our offices volunteered last year:

AZ MOM Line

This was the line waiting to get in.  Thousands of people waited overnight and in the rain to receive dental care.

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Some of our great team!  From Left to Right: Dr Dastrup, Ann – Hygienist, Dr Miller, Morgan – Assistant, Darlene – Assistant, Jennifer – Assistant, and Dr Jenkins.

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Dr Jenkins and Darlene

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Dr Miller and Morgan

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Dr Dastrup and Jennifer, hard at work!

Anne AZ MOM

Ann, Hygienist, helping brighten smiles!

Amanda Andra AZ MOM

Amanda and Andra, Hygienists, getting ready to clean!

Amanda AZ MOM

Amanda, Hygienist, helping fight plaque and tartar build-up to make a happy mouth!

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After waiting in such a long line, it feels nice to relax and have Andra, Hygienist, clean your teeth!

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Here are the awesome statistics from last years Mission of Mercy event.  We are looking forward to going again this year!  If you are interested in volunteering for this event, everyone is welcome!  You do not have to be a medical profession, there is a job for everyone.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

Home

 

What type of Floss is right for you?

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Andra Mahoney BS RDH 

What type of floss is right for you?

Several months ago, Wendy wrote a great article on the necessity of flossing ( https://dentistrydonedifferently.com/2014/05/19/flossing-do-i-have-to/).  Now that you have accepted that flossing is an integral part of your oral health, let’s pick out the right floss for you! There are a plethora of different types of floss, so you are bound to find the one that fits your wants and needs.

Let’s first examine your basic floss: 

There are two main types of floss: String and Tape.

String is the most common type of floss, and what everyone thinks of when they think floss.

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String floss comes in nylon or polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE).  Nylon floss is the most common string floss.  It comes in all different types of flavors and thicknesses.  It even comes waxed and un-waxed. The wax is added to the floss to help fit through teeth with tight contacts.

PTFE floss is a lot like a plastic string. It is a monofilament, which means it’s not made from multiple fibers so it will not rip, shread, or tear.  PTFE floss is newer and people seem to like it because it is strong!  It also comes in many thicknesses and flavors, though it is not waxed because it is made to glide between teeth.  Because of its strength, I recommend not snapping the floss between your teeth.  It can very easily hurt the gum tissue if it is pulled too hard.

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Dental Tape is becoming more and more common nowadays. It is very similar to, but wider than, string floss.  Many people with sensitive gums like tape floss because they find it more comfortable when flossing below the gum line.  It is also a great “starter” floss because it is thinner than regular nylon floss.

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Advanced Types of Floss:

Spongy or Super Floss is ideal for cleaning braces, bridges, and wide gaps between teeth. Super Floss has three unique components—a stiffened-end dental floss threader, spongy floss, and regular floss—all work together for maximum benefits. It allows you to floss under appliances, cleans around appliances, between wide spaces, and removes plaque under the gumline.

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Floss Threaders come in two different types.  One looks like a large, thin, sewing needle. The plus side of this type of threader is that you can thread any type of floss and pull it through. It makes it easy to use whatever floss you have lying around the house. The down side is you have to thread the floss each time you use it.

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CAN Eez Thru Floss Threaders Demo

A little bit easier is the floss threader that is kind of like a shoe string. It has a built in threader tip attached to the floss, so there is one less step than the other floss threader. Both threaders are great for any appliance: bridges, braces, lingual bars, etc.

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Other Options:

Floss Picks are great for flossing hard to reach spaces or when you’re on the go. You don’t have to be in a bathroom to floss! A few tips to remember, never reuse a floss pick. The plaque bacteria that is removed by the flosser isn’t always seen. You do not want that bacteria to be reintroduced into your mouth. Which brings us to tip two, use four flossers in one flossing session. One for the upper right, upper left, lower left, and lower right (each side is measured from the last molar to the midline between your front teeth). When using standard floss, you use about 18 inches. A flosser has about one inch of floss. You do not want to transfer the bacteria from one side of the mouth to the other. So after you have used one, toss it, and grab another. Flossers are very inexpensive and come in multipacks.

Floss pic

Powered Flossers are very useful for older people who find it hard to manipulate string floss into their mouth. A disposable tip is placed on the end of the powered flosser and when the button is depressed, the floss gently vibrates back and forth. Just place it between your teeth and floss away! As with the floss picks, please do not reuse the disposable ends of the flosser.

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Interproximal brushes are helpful to those who have wider spaces between their teeth. Two options are soft picks, which are like rubber toothpicks.

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And the other interdental brushes are like small pipe cleaners.

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 The difference between the two comes down to preference and how wide the space is between your teeth. Both options come in various sizes. These are also one time use items that come in a pack.

Extra Helpers:

Rubber Tip Simulators are not a type of floss, but they are handy in plaque removal. They are mainly used for cleaning under operculums. An operculum is a small flap of gum tissue. It is usually found in the back of the mouth by the last tooth. It can occur naturally or come about from a tooth that has not fully erupted into the mouth.

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 As seen in the picture, the right side is a normal tooth, and the left has an operculum. Plaque can get under this flap of tissue so it will need to be cleaned. Just take the rubber tip stimulated and swipe gently under the tissue.

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WaterPiks work wonderfully in addition to your floss!  Please remember, do not substitute waterpicks for brushing and flossing. Unlike flossing, waterpicks do not remove plaque. They are effective for people who have orthodontic braces, which may retain food in areas a toothbrush cannot reach, people who catch food between their teeth, or people who are looking for extra help with their gums.

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Brief Overview:

Large gaps between your teeth? Try dental tape or Super Floss.

Not much space between your teeth? You may find that a waxed floss is easier to slide into those tight spaces.

Want less mess? Look for disposable flossers or floss in pre-measured strands.

Braces or bridges? A spongy floss is a good option, but any floss can be used if you have a floss threader.

As you can see there are a lot of options out there! But do not fear! A study from the University of Buffalo stated, “Believe it or not, researchers have compared different types of dental floss to determine whether some are more effective than others to clean teeth. The bottom line is that they are not. Any type of floss will help promote clean teeth by removing food particles and bacteria.”

Just remember that when it comes to dental floss, flossing every day is the most important choice you and your family can make.

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(microscopic image of used dental floss)

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

 

Sources:
http://www.oralb.com/topics/all-floss-types-work-well-when-used-daily.aspx

http://www.oralb.com/topics/choosing-the-best-dental-floss-for-you.aspx

http://www.deltadentalins.com/oral_health/flossing3.html

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/thomas-p-connelly-dds/dental-floss_b_1643933.html

Dental Fears

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Becky Larson RDH

I once had an elementary school teacher who would scream if she heard the word “dentist.” About 75% of the population has some form of dental anxiety while about 5-10% of the population has an actual dental phobia. There are various degrees of dental anxiety/phobia, some even requiring psychiatric help. Those who experience this fear of going to the dentist will often avoid dental appointments until they are in extreme pain. I think we all realize that sometimes going to the dentist is just not fun. However, some signs that you may suffer from legitimate dental anxiety/phobia include trouble sleeping the night before a dental appointment, nervous feelings that increase in the dental office waiting room, crying or feeling physically sick when thinking about the dentist, and/or panic attacks or difficulty breathing when at or thinking of the dentist.

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So what causes dental anxiety or dental phobia? Some common reasons for experiencing dental anxiety are fear of pain, fear of injections, fear that injections won’t work, fear of anesthetic side effects, fear of not being in control, embarrassment, and loss of personal space. The key to dealing with any of these fears is to talk to your dentist. If your dentist is aware of your fear(s) he/she can suggest ways to make you feel more comfortable when in the dental chair. Some helpful strategies include:

  • Having your dentist explain procedures in detail prior to and during treatment
  • Topical anesthetic and/or closing your eyes during injections
  • Establish a “stop” signal when you want your dentist to stop or give you a break
  • Nitrous oxide prior to treatment
  • Prescription pre-medication (such as Halcion)
  • Sedation/general anesthesia

At our offices we do offer intravenous sedation techniques for dental treatment. With these techniques, sedation drugs are administered through an IV in the patient’s arm or hand. While the patient is sedated, they will still be still be conscious and able to respond to dental staff. They will also be able to breathe on their own.

Recognizing dental fears and finding ways to cope with them is extremely important to your dental health. Regular check-ups and cleanings can help prevent recurrent decay, which in turn can reduce the amount of time and money you spend at the dentist.

 

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

 

Sources:

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/easing-dental-fear-adults

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dental_phobia

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/Oral-and-Dental-Health-Basics/Checkups-and-Dental-Procedures/The-Dental-Visit/article/What-is-Dental-Anxiety-and-Phobia.cvsp

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=dnetal+anxiety&FORM=HDRSC2

Hydrogen Peroxide

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Lora Cook RDH

 Is Using Hydrogen Peroxide as a Mouth Rinse Safe?

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Many commercial mouth washes and whitening strips have hydrogen peroxide as one of the key active ingredients. However many are using straight hydrogen peroxide as a mouth wash to kill germs. Is this a safe and effect practice?

Hydrogen peroxide is compose of water and oxygen that works to kills germs and bacteria, and helps to whiten teeth.  It comes in either 1% or 3% concentrations. You can even see it in action!  When it foams in your mouth you know that it is working at killing bacteria.  It also can be used to clean your night guard, retainers, or even soak your tooth brush in.  Best of all it is inexpensive. 

 However this is not the magic cure all, there are some strong precautions that I would like to share with you.  While there are many benefits it can be harmful on gum tissue if used in too strong a solution or too long.  It is very drying to the tissues. This will also work to kill good bacteria in the mouth.  This will leave opportunity for yeast infections of the mouth to flourish, also called thrush.  Candidiasis is a fungal or yeast infection of the mouth or throat. Candida yeast that normally live in the mucosa membrane will flourish causing a over growth of candida, commonly called yeast infections. 

This can be a relatively safe practice by following a few guidelines; dilute peroxide with 50% water, and do use every day.  If you are one of the many people who suffer from dry mouth stick with a over the counter rinse formulated for dry mouth sufferers. 

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.using-hydrogen-peroxide.com/hydrogen-peroxide-as-mouthwash.html

http://copublications.greenfacts.org/en/tooth-whiteners/l-3/6-tooth-whitening-side-effects.htm

http://www.healthline.com/health/thrush#Symptoms4

What is a Dental Implant?

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Amanda Orvis RDH

A dental implant is a titanium post used to replace missing teeth and support dental prosthetics. Implants are surgically guided into the jaw bone and integrate with the bone to support a dental prosthesis such as a crown, bridge and/or denture.

Success or failure of dental implants can depend on a few factors. Smoking is one of the number one causes of implant failure. Smoking can slow down the healing as well as act as an irritant to the tissue and bone surrounding the implant. Certain prescription medications can affect the integration of the implant with the surrounding bone as well. Stress to the implant due to clenching and/or grinding, also known as bruxing, can also be a significant factor on the success or failure of the implants. All of these potential issues will be discussed during your implant evaluation appointment.

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Individual tooth replacement

For an individual tooth, an implant is selected and placed into the site of the missing tooth. The implant is given 3-6 months time to heal and integrate into the surrounding bone so that it becomes permanently stable. Once the implant has integrated with the surrounding bone the implant is ready to be restored. An impression is taken to allow a custom crown to be fabricated. Once the crown is fabricated, an implant abutment is placed into the implant and secured by a screw. The crown is then cemented in place on top of the implant abutment.

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Implant supported bridge

An implant supported bridge is a group of teeth supported by two or more dental implants. The process of placing an implant supported bridge is very similar to the individual implant placement discussed above. To begin, implants are selected and placed into the sites of two or more missing teeth. The implants are given time to heal and to integrate with the surrounding bone. Once the implants have integrated with the surrounding bone the implants are ready to be restored. An impression is taken to allow a custom bridge to be fabricated. Implant abutments are placed into the implants and then secured with screws. The implant abutments will act as anchors to support the floating teeth between the implants known as pontics. The bridge is then cemented in place on top of the implant abutments.

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Implant Supported Denture

Implant supported dentures can be made to be removable or permanently fixed into the mouth. Removable implant supported dentures can be disconnected from the implant abutments with finger pressure by the wearer. To enable this, the abutment is shaped as a small connector, which can be connected to an adapter on the underside of the denture. A permanently fixed implant supported denture is secured in place by your dentist with screws. Even though dentures are placed, it is still import to note that you must visit with your dentist at least once a year to have your tissue and implants examined.

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Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

 

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=dental+implants&rlz=1T4GGNI_enUS478US479&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=rdJqVJ6MK8XNiAKv9YCQCQ&ved=0CAgQ_AUoAQ&biw=2133&bih=952&dpr=0.75#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=eMm4N-kgaUlBlM%253A%3B3WWM7H1IqnqHuM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.elkgrovesmilecenter.com%252Fthedentalsitecontent%252F887%252FImage%252Fdental-implants-scenarios.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.elkgrovesmilecenter.com%252FServices%252FElk-Grove-Village-Dental-Implants%252F2390%3B700%3B190

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https://www.google.com/search?q=implant+supported+bridge&rlz=1T4ADRA_enUS397US398&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=p4tjVM-nPI-sogTz8ILQCw&ved=0CAgQ_AUoAQ&biw=1440&bih=708%20-%20facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=ky4WogzaSbnB7M%253A%3BzRnYA9mCT4yCFM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.longislandperio.com%252Ffiles%252F2012%252F01%252F3-unit-implant-bridge_ti-abutments_tcm261-41493.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.longislandperio.com%252Fdental-implants%252#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=BaJFRVOs6xP5WM%253A%3BWRT69acQ4lnnqM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.foralifetimeofsmiles.com%252Fwp-content%252Fuploads%252F2013%252F07%252Fimplant-supported-bridge.gif%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.foralifetimeofsmiles.com%252Foral-surgery%252F%3B400%3B164

https://www.google.com/search?q=types+of+implant+supported+denture&rlz=1T4ADRA_enUS397US398&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=JY1jVJDkCNLSoATo-YDQBg&ved=0CAgQ_AUoAQ&biw=1440&bih=708%20-%20facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=o0SUhE97Ov1DRM%253A%3B9ZakGA12S_8WBM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Floulyprostheticdentistry.com%252Fuploads%252F3%252F2%252F4%252F8%252F3248400%252F6261953.jpg%253F318%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.loulyprostheticdentistry.com%252Fdental-implants

Sugar

Arianna Headshot

Arianna Marsden RDH

 

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With all the candy that has come into our homes as a result of trick or treating, now seems like a great time of year to review strategies for preventing cavities.  Cavities are caused by acid-producing-bacteria that are present in our mouths.  Bacteria consume the sugars in the foods we eat and produce acid.  This acid produced by bacteria in our mouths softens the hardest outer layer of our teeth, the enamel, and causes tooth decay or cavities.  Some of the best ways to prevent cavities are to eat sugars in moderation, limit the amount of time our teeth are exposed to acid, and practicing proper oral health habits.

In order to prevent cavities, it’s important to eat sugars in moderation.  The sugars being referred to be not just the sugars found in candies and soda, but also natural sugars such as those found in fruits and nuts!  Bacteria are not picky about the type of sugar they like to eat, and will produce enamel-softening acid even from something as healthy as sugar in an apple.  Keep in mind that while fruits are important for a healthy diet, how frequently these sugars are consumed plays a big part in their capacity to cause cavities.  This is why it’s important to limit the amount of time our teeth are exposed to acid.

When sugar is eaten, acid-levels in the mouth spike for a period of about one hour before they are neutralized again by the saliva.  The longer sugar is in contact with our teeth, the longer bacteria have a chance to produce acid.  Sticky candies, like sugared fruit snacks, caramels, or lollipops should be avoided, because they tend to stick to the teeth for a longer period of time.

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Another factor that causes acid-levels in the mouth to stay high is grazing on candy throughout the day.  This grazing-style of eating prevents the saliva from being able to neutralize the acid levels in the mouth, as they are continuously spiking from the intake of sugar.  This high acid-level environment is the perfect storm for causing cavities, but there are some strategies we can use to assist our saliva in neutralizing the acid-level in our mouths.  Drinking a glass of water, or thoroughly brushing teeth after eating sugar are great for neutralizing acid.  Chewing a piece of sugar-free gum for about 20 minutes after eating has also been shown to stimulate saliva flow and quickly neutralize the acid-level in our mouths.

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We should be brushing our teeth at least twice a day, with a soft toothbrush and a small, pea-sized amount of fluoridated toothpaste.  Flossing at least once a day is critical for removing plaque bacteria from between the teeth.  Brushing and flossing removes plaque bacteria from our teeth, and fewer bacteria present in our mouths means less potential acid that can be produced.  Fluoride has been demonstrated to dramatically reduce the damage caused by cavities, and when used properly, is a great strategy for preventing cavities.

Fluoride in our toothpaste and water at home can help prevent cavities, as well as professional fluoride treatments provided at the dentist’s office.

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Being selective about the types of candy that we are giving to our trick or treaters, when and how much candy we are eating, and being especially conscientious about our oral health practices will be helpful strategies in preventing cavities this holiday season.

 

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

 

Sources

https://www.dentalhealth.org/tell-me-about/topic/caring-for-teeth/sugar-free-chewing-gum

http://www.deltadentalins.com/oral_health/halloweendw.html

http://www.rudyard.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/toothbrush-and-toothpaste-and-floss.jpg

http://i3.dainikbhaskar.com/thumbnail/300×259/web2images/www.dailybhaskar.com/2014/05/15/4907_lollipop.jpg

http://stayhealthyla.org/blog/uploads//2010/03/sugar.jpg

https://www.dentalhealth.org/uploads/images/chewinggumchart.jpg

 

 

Tooth in a Tube

Kara

Kara Johansen BS RDH

If your dentist said that there was a procedure he/she could do to prevent and reverse cavities would you do it?

Well, guess what, there is such a procedure! As a hygienist I would have appointments that were very frustrating. These patients use mouthwash, brush two times a day, floss 2 times a day, they don’t rinse out their toothpaste, they come to their 6 month appointments, have great nutritional habits, don’t smoke or drink, and don’t take medications. However, some of these fabulous patients still get cavities. Then the dentist says that he/she is going to “watch” the tooth hoping that through good oral hygiene habits it will get better. Most of the time, honestly, the “watch” areas do not resolve. Finally we found a solution. This miracle procedure is made possible by MI Paste Plus aka Tooth in a Tube.

What is MI Paste?

Mi paste

Besides good oral hygiene our body has ways of remineralizing or strengthening our teeth. In our saliva we naturally have Calcium and Phosphate. These are minerals like fluoride and can reverse small cavities. However, when we have habits that decrease saliva flow and the mouth becomes more acidic. MI Paste is a product that helps balance out the decrease in saliva and acidity of the mouth. MI Paste has Calcium and Phosphate and MI Paste Plus has fluoride.

  • MI Paste and MI Paste Plus (with fluoride) contain RECALDENT™ (CPP-ACP); Casein Phosphopeptide (CPP) are natural occurring molecules which are able to release calcium and phosphate ions and stabilize Amorphous Calcium Phosphate (ACP)
  • RECALDENT™ (CPP-ACP) is milk derived with lactose content less than 0.01%*
  • MI Paste and MI Paste Plus are water-based, sugar-free topical tooth crèmes
  • 5 Flavors melon, mint, strawberry, tutti-frutti and vanilla

(http://www.mi-paste.com/about.php)

Who benefits from MI Past Plus?

When a patient comes into our chair we access their cavity risk level. Here is the list of low risk patients.

Low Risk-

  • Fluroide exposure
  • Occasional sugary foods and drinks at meal time
  • No cavities in mother, care give/or siblings for past 24 months (for patients ages 6-14)
  • Has a dental home- patient of record, recieves regular dental care
  • No special Health care needs
  • No Chemo/Radiation Therapy
  • No Eating disorders
  • No Medications that reduce Salivary Flow
  • No drug or alcohol abuse
  • No tobacco/electronic cigarette
  • No new carious lesions
  • No missing teeth in past 36 months
  • No visible plaque
  • No unusual teeth shapes
  • No fillings between the teeth
  • No exposed root surfaces
  • No fillings with a large ledge
  • No spaces where food gets caught
  • No braces
  • No dry mouth

After a patient has been given a risk level the clinician will decide if they are eligible for MI Paste Plus. Looking at the low risk evaluation most people would say yes to one or more of the list above. If you have said yes to one of the above listed items you are at high risk for cavities. Most people would benefit from MI Paste Plus.

What can MI Paste Plus do for You?

  • reduce sensitivity
  • reduce symptoms of xerostomia (dry mouth) : medications, medical conditions, chemotherapy, decreased salivary gland function, smoking, drug use, and stress
  • it can help remineralize weak enamel
  • remove white spot lesions. Your dentist can also use MI paste Plus to remove weak enamel and white spot lesions on the teeth with a process called enamel microbrasion. Ask one of our Dentists about this procedure. imagesCAD5OMMG

How to Apply? (from the MI Paste web site)

  • Brush with a fluoride toothpaste in the morning and at night
  • Apply a pea-sized amount of MI Paste to your teeth’s surface using a cotton swab or gloved finger
  • Leave undisturbed for 3 minutes
  • Expectorate (spit) but do not rinse; leave the excess to slowly dissolveIt’s that simple!Your dentist will likely use one of the following methods to apply MI Paste/MI Paste Plus:Custom Tray Application:
  • Fill a custom tray with MI Paste
  • Place it in your mouth
  • Leave undisturbed for 3 minutes
  • Remove tray and spread remaining MI Paste over tooth surfaces with a gloved finger

Where do I purchase MI Paste?

MI paste cannot be purchased at your pharmacy or local grocery store. You can buy MI Paste Plus from your Dentist or on amazon.com.

 

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

 

Picture Sources:

www.dentaleconomics.com

www.mi-paste.com

What is a Dental Crown?

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Julie West BS RDH

A dental crown is a manufactured covering that fits over a prepared tooth to protect it from decay or fracture or to protect a tooth that has had root canal treatment. A crown may also be used to replace a tooth that is discolored or poorly shaped due to chipping or defects during formation.

crowns

Typically, the process of getting a crown involves two visits that are two weeks apart. The first visit consists of the dentist removing any decay that may be present and using a dental handpiece to shape and prepare the tooth for a crown to fit over top. An impression will then be taken of the prepared tooth structure. Your dentist or dental assistant will then make a temporary crown that will serve to protect the tooth over the next two weeks while your permanent crown is being made at a dental lab. At your second visit, the permanent crown will be tried in to ensure the color and fit are ideal. If both are satisfactory, the crown will be cemented to the prepared tooth surface.

Sensitivity after a crown is placed is common and may take several weeks to subside. Over the counter pain medication may be used to handle any discomfort. Contact your dentist if the pain persists or gets worse.

Patients should be aware that crowns, like natural teeth, may not last for life. The longevity and durability of your crown is affected by several factors including: your diet, oral homecare with brushing and flossing daily, and the type of material the crown is made out of. Please ask your dentist or dental hygienist if you have any questions.

http://www.marlboroughdental.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/CROWNS.jpg

image source: bendfamilydentist.com

 

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

 Sources:

What is a Root Canal?

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Andra Mahoney RDHBS

So the Doctor has told you that you need a Root Canal Treatment.  What does that mean?  Why is it necessary? And where do you go from here?

Root canal treatment is necessary when the pulp (soft tissue inside your teeth containing blood vessels, nerves and connective tissue) becomes inflamed or diseased.

anatomy-of-a-tooth

 http://culpepperdds.wordpress.com/for-patients/basic-tooth-anatomy/

 During root canal treatment, your dentist or endodontist (a dentist who specializes in treating the insides of teeth) removes the diseased pulp. The pulp chamber and root canal(s) of the tooth are then cleaned and sealed.

 

blood cell types

 http://www.dentistsonwashington.com/root-canals/

 If the infected pulp is not removed, pain and swelling can result, and your tooth may have to be removed.

Causes of an infected pulp could include:

  • A deep cavity

Deep-cavity-before

http://blog.distinctive-smiles.com/wp-content//Deep-cavity-before.jpg

  • repeated dental procedures on the same tooth
  • injury to the tooth (even if there’s not a visible crack or chip)
  • a cracked or broken tooth
    Broken Tooth 

http://www.mcardledmd.com/what-it-means-to-have-cts.html

 

If you continue to care for your teeth and gums your restored tooth could last a lifetime. However, regular checkups are necessary; a tooth without its nerve can still develop cavities or gum disease. Most of the time, a root canal is a relatively simple procedure with little or no discomfort involving one to three visits. Best of all, it can save your tooth and your smile.

perfect-smile

 http://faceandjawsurgeryblog.com/wp-content/uploads/perfect-smile.jpg

 

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

 

References:
  http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/r/root-canals