Invisalign

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Amanda Orvis RDH 

 invisalignlogo

 

Invisalign is a uniquely designed orthodontic treatment developed to correct mild to severe cases of malocclusion, including crowding, protruding or crooked teeth, overbites and/or underbites. Invisalign is an affordable option for correcting most dental malocclusion problems.

 

WHAT MAKES INVISALIGN DIFFERENT?

 

You may be asking yourself, what is the difference between Invisalign and traditional braces? With Invisalign you can achieve very similar if not the same outcomes as traditional braces. The advantages of Invisalign are the comfort, flexibility, and ease of access to properly care for your teeth without having brackets, wires or rubber bands in your mouth.

invisalign-vs-braces

 

Invisalign uses a series of aligners to straighten your teeth over the course of your treatment. Aligners are smooth plastic trays that you wear over your teeth. Each set of aligners is worn for a few weeks before changing to a new set.

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ADVANTAGES

 

The great thing about Invisalign is that there are no personal sacrifices in terms of food! You do not have to give up popcorn, chips, bagels, pizza crust, pretzels, nuts, apples, carrots, or corn on the cob. Fortunately, Invisalign aligners are removable, therefore allowing you to eat and drink as well as brush and floss your teeth as you would normally do. The aligners are worn for 20-22 hours a day while they gradually move your teeth into their correct positions. The aligners should only be removed to eat as well as brush and floss your teeth.

 

HEALTHIER TEETH AND GUMS

 

Often times crowding or malocclusion issues can lead to swollen, red, bleeding gums. These are signs of periodontal disease. By properly aligning the teeth, inflammation is reduced, allowing your gum tissue to fit properly around the teeth. This provides a defense against potential periodontal problems.

Food debris and plaque build-up can lead to tooth decay. In order to maintain strong healthy teeth, simply remove your aligners and brush and floss as you would normally do. Try to avoid eating and/or drinking while your aligners are in your mouth.

 

THE INVISALIGN PROCESS

  1. Talk to your dentist about your interest in Invisalign.
  2. Your dentist will take impressions and photos and send them off to Invisalign. A customized treatment plan will be created just for you.
  3. After your treatment plan is created, you will then go into your dental office for a brief viewing of a virtual presentation of your anticipated final outcomes.
  4. Upon your approval of your anticipated outcomes, Invisalign then fabricates your series of aligners and sends them to your dental office.
  5. Your dental office will then call you to schedule an appointment for you to come in and receive your first set of aligners.
  6. Over the course of your Invisalign treatment you will change out your aligners every few weeks.
  7. After the completion of all of your aligners, retainers are then made to keep your teeth in their new positions to keep that new smile looking great.

We look forward to helping you create that new smile that you have always wanted.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

 Sources:

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=invisalign+logo&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=McLNU4HYBsyRigKMrYHgBg&sqi=2&ved=0CAYQ_AUoAQ&biw=1455&bih=649&dpr=1.1#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=ppEm1tcLQDsWdM%253A%3BHoiq8xzkzJxlAM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.sleepdentists.com%252Fimages%252FInvisalign.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.sleepdentists.com%252Finvisalign.html%3B1688%3B677

 

http://www.invisalign.com/how-invisalign-works

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=invisalign+vs+braces&tbm=isch&imgil=XUGHWDXfdD2a-M%253A%253Bhttps%253A%252F%252Fencrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com%252Fimages%253Fq%253Dtbn%253AANd9GcRvBYeXNPP9sv-xb4J-Gtrx9qQymztXqkddcgUFH5qLhUDpEOs-Xw%253B620%253B350%253BKd_nANmUSaFf6M%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.masriortho.com%25252Finvisalign-vs-braces&source=iu&usg=__PRQlvmHglFglwqVUOmV6SXSAbUQ%3D&sa=X&ei=8ZysU-6IHImDogSj7ICwAQ&sqi=2&ved=0CFEQ9QEwAg&biw=2133&bih=975&dpr=0.75#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=XUGHWDXfdD2a-M%253A%3BKd_nANmUSaFf6M%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.masriortho.com%252Fwp-content%252Fuploads%252F2013%252F05%252Finvisalign-vs-braces.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.masriortho.com%252Finvisalign-vs-braces%3B620%3B350

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=invisalign+vs+braces&tbm=isch&imgil=XUGHWDXfdD2a-M%253A%253Bhttps%253A%252F%252Fencrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com%252Fimages%253Fq%253Dtbn%253AANd9GcRvBYeXNPP9sv-xb4J-Gtrx9qQymztXqkddcgUFH5qLhUDpEOs-Xw%253B620%253B350%253BKd_nANmUSaFf6M%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.masriortho.com%25252Finvisalign-vs-braces&source=iu&usg=__PRQlvmHglFglwqVUOmV6SXSAbUQ%3D&sa=X&ei=8ZysU-6IHImDogSj7ICwAQ&sqi=2&ved=0CFEQ9QEwAg&biw=2133&bih=975&dpr=0.75#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=JTAejR9TeI5dYM%253A%3BfgICUBiM2Ty84M%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.212smiling.com%252Fwp-content%252Fuploads%252F2013%252F02%252Fbody-1.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.212smiling.com%252Fblog%252F2013%252F03%252Finvisalign-vs-braces-which-option-is-better-for-you%252F%3B607%3B171

“They are just baby teeth. So what does it matter”?

Peggy

 

Peggy Storr BSRDH

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Many people think that dental care of baby (primary) teeth isn’t really necessary. They aren’t permanent teeth and they will be lost eventually. The truth is that as soon as those little teeth appear, they should be cleaned daily. A tiny smear of toothpaste should start about the age of 1, as should the first visit to the dentist. Many of the baby teeth will be in your child’s mouth until he or she is 13 years old.

Look in your child’s mouth. White spots or lesions are early signs of demineralization or decay of the teeth. These lesions can be reversed with proper homecare and administration of fluoride and or MI Paste.

imgres

www.recaldent.com

Early-Childhood-Caries1

http://www.babyorganics.co.id/general/dental-caries-on-children/

Decay (cavities or caries) in baby teeth is a serious health concern that is now known to be contagious. Dental decay is five times more common than asthma and seven times more common than hay fever in children. While decay in permanent teeth has declined, decay in baby teeth is increasing. Left untreated, cavities can lead to dental pain that can affect a child’s eating, speaking, and learning. It can lead to expensive treatment, malnourishment, disruption of growth and development, and may even cause life threatening infections. If the dentist simply pulls the decayed tooth, it can affect how the permanent teeth grow in. The space from the baby tooth must be preserved or the permanent teeth may erupt in a crowded and incorrect position.

Most people are surprised to learn that cavities are contagious. But bacteria, particularly Mutans Streptococci, are responsible for tooth decay and bacteria can be transmitted from one person to another. If mom cleans the baby’s pacifier by putting it in her own mouth, or shares a spoon, she can transfer bacteria to the baby. Being mindful of diet is a first step in prevention of tooth decay. Dipping a pacifier in honey or sugar is a bad idea, as is letting a child go to bed with a bottle of milk, juice, or anything other than water.

Chewy, sticky foods (such as dried fruit or candy) are best if eaten as part of a meal rather than as a snack. If possible, brush the teeth or rinse the mouth with water after eating these foods. Minimize snacking, which creates a constant supply of acid in the mouth. Avoid constant sipping of sugary drinks or frequent sucking on candy and mints. The sticky sour candies kids love so much are the worst as they stay in the mouth longer and cause significant increases in the acid that cause tooth decay.

Dental sealants can prevent some cavities. Sealants are thin plastic-like coatings applied to the chewing surfaces of the molars. This coating prevents the buildup of plaque in the deep grooves on these surfaces. Sealants are often applied on the teeth of children, shortly after the molars come in.

Fluoride is also recommended to protect against dental caries. People who get fluoride in their drinking water or by taking fluoride supplements have less tooth decay. Numerous studies report that products containing Xylitol decrease tooth decay. Gum or mints for children who are beyond the choking stage are recommended. Xylitol needs to be among the first three ingredients.

Dental disease can impact the total well-being of a child and is largely preventable.  So while they are “JUST BABY TEETH”, they are a vital consideration in the health of your child.  A healthy mouth contributes to the overall health every child.

Sources:

1. Ezer, Michelle, S, DDS, Swoboda, Natalie A DDS and Farkouh, David DMD, MS; Early Childhood Caries: The Dental Disease of Infants

2. Chow AW. Infections of the oral cavity, neck, and head. In: Mandell GL, Bennett JE, Dolin R, eds. Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2009:chap 60.

3. Sleeper, Laura J, RDH, MA and Gronski Ashley; The Benefits of Xylitol; http://Dimensionsofdentalhygiene.com/June 2014

4. http://www.thedentalleif.net

5. http:// twoothtimer.com

Fluoride: It’s not just for the kids.

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Andra Mahoney BS RDH
 
When someone says fluoride, most of us automatically think children. While it is true that fluoride is an important part of our children’s oral health, it is also a necessity for adults as well. Adults, just like children, get cavities. So adults, just like children, should receive fluoride.In fact, there are many age related problems that increase our need for fluoride.Some examples include:

  • Eating disorders
  • Drug or Alcohol abuse
  • Lack of regular professional dental care
  • Poor Oral Hygiene
  • Exposed root surfaces of teeth, recession
  • Decreased salivary flow, resulting in dry mouth
  • Poor diet
  • Existing fillings
  • Tooth enamel defects
  • Undergoing head and neck radiation therapy

I’d like to address recession and dry mouth specifically, since those are very common problems.

Recession- Recession is when the gums have receded below the crown of the tooth, exposing the root to the tooth. 

IMG_0074      IMG_0076.

This creates two main problems. First, the roots of the teeth do not have enamel, they are covered by cementum.

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As we all know, enamel is the hard material that protects the surface of the tooth. Enamel is 70 times stronger than cementum. This, unfortunately, means that the roots of the teeth are more prone to decay than the crowns of the teeth. The best recommendation for recession and the prevention of decay is fluoride. Make sure you are using a soft bristled brush with soft brushing (to prevent further recession) in combination with fluoride toothpaste. Also, you may received fluoride treatments at your dental appointments. The most beneficial would be fluoride varnish. Your hygienist is able to apply this for you at each appointment. The varnish coats the tooth in a protective layer of fluoride to aid in the prevention of decay.

The second problem that recession creates is sensitivity. When the root is exposed tiny little tubules open up on the tooth and the chances for sensitivity increase. This makes eating or drinking cold or sweet things painful. You will often notice a sharp zing when the area of recession comes in contact with cold or sweet items. The best recommendation for sensitivity due to recession is fluoride. Sensitivity toothpaste, such as Sensodyne, contain an increased amount of fluoride (as opposed to regular toothpaste) to assist in the prevention of sensitivity (and decay).

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Fluoride varnish is also helpful as it coats the tooth and temporarily closes the tubules decreasing the sensitivity. 

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Xerostomia

The last topic that I wanted to address is dry mouth, also known as xerostomia. Many adults take medicine and the most common side effect of many medications is dry mouth. A decrease in saliva increases your risk for decay. Saliva is important in washing away bits of food, neutralizing acids created by bacteria, as well as containing minerals that help prevent tooth decay. If you are having problems with dry mouth, try rinsing with a fluoride mouth was or a saliva substitute.

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All these reasons and many more show the importance of fluoride use for adults. If you have any other questions about the other problems that fluoride can help with, feel free to make an appointment with us and we’ll answer all your questions! 

 

Want to learn more? Visit us at http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com/

 

References:

Fluoride Treatments in the Dental Office ADA: http://www.ada.org/sections/scienceAndResearch/pdfs/patient_72.pdf

Can Fluoride Help Adults? Colgate: http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/Oral-and-Dental-Health-at-Any-Age/Adults/Adult-Maintenance-and-Care/article/Can-Fluoride-Help-Adults.cvsp

Recommendations for Using Fluoride to Prevent and Control Dental Caries in the United States CDC: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5014a1.htm

Pictures:

http://www.drneal.com/pages/library/images/clip_image002.jpg

http://worcesterdentalimplants.com/_ah/editor/images/DSC_0258.JPG

http://www.vaughns-1-pagers.com/local/sunnyvale-dentist/tooth-anatomy.gif

http://www.beffadental.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/imbvarnish_brush1.gif

http://www.m.sensodyne.com/?redirectfrom=www.sensodyne.us+R-https%3a%2f%2fwww.google.com%2f

http://pics2.ds-static.com/prodimg/380812/300.JPG

 

Save a Tooth, Save a Smile

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Julie West BS RDH

I have had several nightmares about my teeth being knocked out.  I wake up in a panic to the relief that they are still there.  Losing a tooth to injury can be very scary, and those precious minutes following the displacement of the tooth are critical.  If you are a parent, a coach, or have any involvement with children, the following tips can equip you to save a smile.

saveatooth640x480www.saveatooth.com

Baby teeth 

If a child loses a baby tooth after injury, DO NOT attempt to put the tooth back into its socket.  Instead, place the tooth into a tooth saver like this one approved by the ADA.

If you do not have a tooth saver handy, a container of milk, water, or saline solution can be used.  DO NOT scrub/rinse the tooth clean!  Get the child to the dentist as soon as possible.  The faster the tooth can be reimplanted by a dentist, the better.

According to Martha Ann Keels, DDS, PhD, division chief of Pediatric Dentistry at Duke University, injuries to children’s teeth are both common and preventable.  She states, “The good news is most dental injuries can be avoided. But if an accident does occur, don’t worry –- most times even a tooth that’s been knocked out completely can be saved if proper care is taken in the first 20 minutes,” Keels said.

Time is of the essence.

Adult Teeth

If an adult or teenager loses an adult tooth after injury, DO put the tooth back into the socket immediately!   If the tooth has been soiled, gently rinse it with water being careful not to scrub/rinse off any attachments.  Hold the tooth by the crown and gently insert it into the socket.  Hold the tooth in the socket with clean cloth/ gauze until the adult can get to the dentist.

If it is not possible to reinsert the tooth (it is broken into several pieces), use a tooth saver container, milk, water, or saline solution to transport the pieces with the patient to the dentist as soon as possible.

There is no guarantee of long-term retention of a replanted tooth. A small percentage of replanted knocked-out teeth will be lost even with optimum treatment.

Bottom line: get the person and the preserved avulsed teeth to the dentist FAST!

Click here to view the tooth saver product pictured above.  I would encourage all parents, coaches, and school teachers to have a kit like this on-hand in case of dental trauma.  And, of course, all children playing sports should be wearing a mouthguard to help avoid such injuries.  See your dentist to have one made for your child.

www.ada.org

http://www.dukehealth.org/health_library/health_articles/dental_emergency_what_to_do_when_your_child_damages_a_tooth

http://www.prweb.com/releases/2012/7/prweb9734289.htm

Want to learn more? Visit us at http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com/

Oral Bacteria: Sharing or Spreading?

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Becky Larson RDH

            The sharing or spreading of oral bacteria happens very frequently and most people are unaware they are even doing it.  Our mouths are filled with millions of bacteria. When you share food, cups, utensils, toothbrushes, or have contact with someone else’s saliva these bacteria can be transferred from person to person. This can be particularly harmful when sharing with children.

Cavities (caries) are the result of a bacterial infection and young children can “catch” the harmful bacteria that cause cavities. While everybody has bacteria in their mouth, it’s important to try to keep these harmful bacteria from our children’s mouths during their first year or two. Babies are actually born without any harmful bacteria in their mouth.  Once the harmful caries bacteria are introduced, the child may experience tooth decay.

So what does this mean?  It means DON’T SHARE BACTERIA.  I’ve seen many parents (including my own husband) suck their child’s pacifier clean.  This can be both good and bad.  The parent has just introduced new bacteria into their child’s mouth.  Some bacteria are harmless and can actually help prevent allergic reactions.  However, if the parent has any caries bacteria, they have now given those bacteria to their child.  Sharing saliva can also spread the bacteria that cause inflammatory reactions and periodontal disease in adults.

Why does it matter? Tooth decay is the most common chronic childhood disease, five times more common than asthma.  When left untreated, the disease can cause developmental problems.  Tooth decay can lead to mouth pain, which makes it more difficult for a child to eat healthy foods, speak correctly, and even concentrate in school.  Tooth decay can also damage permanent teeth when they erupt.  Periodontal disease cannot currently be cured.  If left untreated, the gums, bone and tissues that support the teeth can be destroyed.  This can result in the loss of teeth.

            Tips on how to prevent bacteria transmission and cavities:

*If your child sleeps with a bottle, fill it with water rather than milk or juice

*Clean baby gums with wet cloth several times per day before baby teeth erupt

*Once your child has erupted teeth, brush them at least twice per day (even if it’s only one tooth!)

*Take your child to the dentist by their 1st birthday or when the first tooth erupts

*Avoid putting anything in your child’s mouth that has been in your mouth

*Avoid kissing your child on the lips

*Avoid sharing food, utensils, cups, and toothbrushes

*Help your child floss their teeth once the teeth are contacting

*Change toothbrushes every 3 months

*Eat a balanced diet, limit sugar intake

*Brush your own teeth twice per day and floss once per day

Sources:

http://www.perio.org/node/224

http://oralhealthmatters.blogspot.com/2013/05/bacteria-in-mouth-are-not-harmless.html

http://brushinguplasalle.com/tag/oral-bacteria/

https://www.deltadental.com/Public/NewsMedia/NewsReleaseBadThingsHappen201108.jsp

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/35989527/ns/health-oral_health/t/moms-kiss-can-spread-cavities-baby/#.UpYHZ9F3uM8

http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/OralHealth/Topics/GumDiseases/PeriodontalGumDisease.htm

Toothpaste

Kara

Kara Johansen BSRDH

The dental isle in the grocery store can be very overwhelming. Rows and rows of toothpastes, mouth rinses, and floss. We are here to help make that isle less confusing.  In a previous post Julie West BS RDH wrote about mouth rinses, thanks Julie! So here is the breakdown of toothpaste.

What is the purpose of toothpaste?

There are 4 reasons to use toothpaste. 1. Fluoride 2. Bacterial Plaque reduction 3. Tartar Inhibition 4. Desensitization. Here is the breakdown of each type of toothpaste.

Fluoride-

  • Fluoride has been the greatest public health venture in the United States. The most rampant form of disease in children is dental decay. Fluoride can cause a 20-30% decrease in decay (451, Wilkins). The fluoride remineralizes areas of decay that are in the beginning stages. When your dentist says they are going to “watch” a tooth it means that the he/she understands the decay can remineralize with good oral hygiene, great nutritional habits and fluoride use.
  • Here is a tip: switch up your oral hygiene routine.
  1. Mouthwash
  2. Floss
  3.  Brush for 2 min with fluoridated toothpaste.
  4. Walk away. Do not rinse after you brush. You want the fluoride to stay on your teeth and remineralize that weak spot that the dentist is watching.
  • Fluoride also helps with: tooth sensitivity, deceases tooth loss, promotes less frequency of periodontal diseases, overall bone health and bacterial reduction.

Bacterial Plaque Reduction-

  • There are different products in toothpastes to decrease the amount of bacteria in the mouth. Some of these products are: Triclosan, fluoride, Chlorhexidine, peroxide and bicarbonate, sanguinaria, and essential oils.
  • Brushing and flossing is the best way to reduce the majority of cavity causing bacteria in the mouth. Plaque is like pancake batter, it is sticky. Mechanical Removal will have the greatest affect on decreasing plaque levels in the mouth.

Dental plaque

http://mpkb.org/home/pathogenesis/microbiota/biofilm

Tartar Inhibition

  • The goal of these toothpastes are to reduce the production of tartar. These toothpastes however, do not have any effect on existing tatar. The toothpastes is meant to reduce the amount of tartar initially created. The only true way to get rid of tartar is mechanical removal by your dentist or hygienist. Come for you cleanings, they would love to help you out with that part. If you don’t love the scrapping do you part at home, brush with an electric toothbrush and floss two times per day.

pp002

http://colgate-sensitive-pro-relief.colgateprofessional.com.hk/patienteducation/Plaque-and-Periodontal-Disease/article

Desensitization

  • Sensitive teeth are no fun. Cold, hot , sweet foods or drinks, and mechanical forces can cause sensitivity.
  • How did I get sensitive teeth? This can be caused by multiple factors. The most common is tooth root exposure. When the gums recede a part of the tooth called dentin is exposed. It is a much more porous structure and sensitivity happens frequently.
  • pated_GingivalRecessionWithExposedRootDentine
  • colgateprofessional.com
  • When you are seeking out a toothpaste for sensitivity look for the active ingredients. Flip that tube of toothpaste over and take a peek. Potassium Nitrate calms down the nerve that is more sensitive with exposed dentin.  Sodium and stannus fluoride strengthen and occlude the more porous dentin.  A mix of Potassium Nitrate and fluoride is your best bet for desensitization.
  • MI Paste RECALDENT (CPP-ACP) has been found to help with sensitivity. Like fluoride it blocks the small porous openings of dentin. You can get a prescription for it from your dentist.
  • Other Products: Sensodyne, Pronamel, Colgate Sensitive Pro Relief, etc. Scan the dental isle.

images

http://www.recaldent.com

sensodyne-group-products-page-10_9_2013

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us.sensodyne.com/products.aspx

Colgate-Sensitive-Pro-Relief-TP-triBox

http://www.colgatesensitiveprorelief.com.sg/products/toothpaste

What is in my toothpaste?

Cleaning and Polishing 20-40%

  • An abrasive is used to clean and the polish smooths the surface of the tooth. These agents help to decrease the adherence of stain and plaque buildup.
  • Possible agents: Calcium carbonate, IMP, dicalcium phosphate, hydrated aluminum oxide, and silica

Detergents 1-2%

  • Detergents make your toothpaste foam and are surfactants. They lower the surface tension, loosen stains, foam, and emulsify debris.
  • Possible agents: sodium laurel sulfate, sodium cocomonoglyceride sulfonate
  • Sodium Laurel Sulfate can cause sloughing of the tissue, make one more prone to canker sores and decreases healing time of mouth sores for some people. Patients who experience this should avoid Sodium Laurel Sulfate. Sensodyne does not use sodium laruel sulfate, this product would be a good choice for you.

Binders 1-2%

  • Binders keep your the solid and liquid ingreadients together

Now the next time you walk down the dental isle hopefully you will know exactly what type of toothpaste is perfect for you and your needs. If you have more questions ask your dentist or dental hygienist.  Watch out for the next post on what type of floss to choose, its going to be a duesy. Happy brushing and don’t forget to floss.

 

Sources:

GC America Professional Dental Site. Frequently Asked Questions. Retrieved from http://www.mi-paste.com/faq.php

Wilkins, E. M. (1994). Clinical Practice of the Dental Hyginienist: Seventh Edition. Media, PA: Williams and Wilkins.

Spheno Palatine Gangleonerualgia

Kim McCrady

Kim McCrady RDH BA

Spheno Palatine Gangleonerualgia

Spheno Palatine Gangleoneuralgia!  Now that’s a mouthful.  But believe it or not, most everyone has experienced spheno patlatine gangleoneuralgia at one time or another.  In fact, as scary as the condition sounds, its uncomfortable but harmless.

So, what causes spheno palatine gangleoneuralgia?  It is the rapid release of blood back to the brain back from the palate after something very cold has been present in the mouth and contacted the roof of the mouth.  This results in a sharp uncomfortable headache.  Fortunately, the headache does not last long.  Have you figured it out yet?  What is spheno palatine gangleoneuralgia?  If you guessed a good old fashioned brain freeze, you are correct.

The roof of our mouths are made up of a hard area, referred to as the hard palate.  Your hard palate is located toward the front of the mouth and extends to the about the middle of the second molars.  It is hard because there are three bones that fused together as you grew to create the hard palate.  The soft palate is located just behind the hard palate and continues down into the throat area.  It is soft because there are no bones present.  The brain freeze according to recent studies is caused by an intense and sudden increase in blood flow through the brain’s anterior cerebral artery due to dilation of the artery.  When the artery constricted, the brain-freeze pain sensation wears off.

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Of course, allowing your cold treat a moment to warm up before it contacts your palate is a start to preventing brain freeze.  But, if your brain freeze is underway the quicker you can warm your palate the quicker the headache will recede.  Cupping you hand like a mask around your mouth and breathing in and out into your cupped hand helps to warm the palate.  As well has pressing your tongue or thumb on the roof of the mouth can shorten that headache. The goal is to prevent the blood vessels in your palate from constricting and dilating due to extreme changes in temperature.

Next time you are in need of a conversation starter, consider asking your friends if they have ever experienced spheno palatine gangleoneuralgia.

Medical News Today:  http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/244458.php

Discovery Fit and Health: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/244458.php

Photo: http://robjundt.hubpages.com/hub/Brain-Freeze-Adventures

STOP IT!! These habits can harm your teeth!

photo

Ann Clark RDH

Enamel is the toughest substance of the body.  But teeth can still be vulnerable when it comes to neglect, abuse or misuse.

1) Chewing on ice, pencils- Harmless? think again.  This habit can chip or crack your tooth.  It can also irritate the inside of the tooth causing toothaches or sensitivity.

ice chewing

2)Sports without mouthguards-Many sports require a mouthguard, a molded piece of plastic protecting your teeth.  Without one you an chip or even knock one out.  Get a custom fit one from your friendly dentist.

3)Bedtime bottles-Giving baby juice, milk or formula at bed can lead to decay.  The remnants bathe the teeth in sugars over night.

getty_rf_photo_of_baby_with_bottle

4)Tongue piercing-Biting on a stud can crack a tooth.  Metal rubbing against gums can cause damage that may lead to tooth loss.  The mouth  is a haven for bacteria increasing the risk of infection.  Over time the metal can also wear down the enamel changing its shape.

piercing

5)Drinking coffee-The dark color and acidity can cause yellowing over time.  Fortunately, it’s one of the easiest to treat with a little whitening.

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6)Smoking/tobacco products-These stain the teeth and lead the way to periodontal disease.  Tobacco can also cause cancer of the mouth, lips and tongue.

cigarette

7)Drinking wine-The acids in wines eat at the enamel creating rough spots.  A stained tooth is like sandpaper attracting more bacteria.  Red wine contains chromogen and tannins which help the color to stick…rinse with water, alcohol dries out your mouth.

8)Constant snacking- This produces less saliva than when eating a meal, leaving food bits in the teeth longer.  Snacks should be low in sugar/starch…try carrots.

9)Binge eating-Binging and purging(Bulemia) can do damage from acids found in vomit that erode enamel, leaving them brittle and weak.  Acids also cause bad breath.

10)Whitening too often- Chronic whitening or not following directions acn lead to gum irritation and increased sensitivity.

11) Bottled water- Most have little to no Fluoride as do home filtration units.  Fluoride remineralizes and strengthens tooth structure.

12)Grinding/Clenching-Bruxism wears the tooth down over a period of time.  If worn to the  inner dentin your teeth become sensitive.  Stress, boredom, and sleeping habits make it hard to control. Worn down teeth make you look older and cause pressure to fracture the teeth.

13)Medications-Oral contraceptives can change your hormones and lead to periodontal disease.  Cough drops are high in sugar content leading to decay.  Antihistamines asue dry mouth as do many meds.  We need our saliva to protect our teeth!

14)Drug Abuse(Meth)- Crystal Meth, an illegal and addictive drug can destroy your teeth.  Users crave sugary drinks and foods, clench and have dry mouth.  They notoriously lack in taking care of themselves.

15)Gummy candy-Sticky foods keep sugars and resulting acids in contact with your enamel for hours.  Eat them with a meal as more saliva is produced helping to rinse your mouth.

gummy bear

16)Sodas/Sports drinks/Fruit juice-Sodas have 11teas. of sugar per serving.  They also contain phosphorus and citric acids which eat at enamel.  Diet skips the sugar but adds more acid (artificial sweetners).  Don’t sip these beverages keeping the teeth bathed, chug them and rinse with water

17)Potato chips-Bacteria in plaque will break down starchy foods into acid.  This acid can attack teeth for 20+ minutes if stuck between the teeth…floss!

18)Using your teeth as a tool-It’s convenient to open a bottle or package this way but it canlad to a chip or crack and nail biting is full of germs and bacterias, don’t chew on them.

tooth tool

19) Brushing too much, too hard or with a hard bristle brush-This can erode enamel. Toothpaste can be abrasive, technique is important so as not to take away enamel.  Skipping check ups and not flossing will, of course, cause problems as well.

Being informed is your best defense!

Ann Clark RDH

 
Photo cited:
 
Cigarette  www.webmd.com
Baby bottle www.webmd.com
Gummy Bear www.markmatters.com
Tooth Tool www.webmd.com
Ice Chewing. www.personal.psu.edu

Wonders of Whitening

There are so many different types of teeth whitening out on the market now-a-days, ever wonder if they all work? Which ones are the best for you? Do they last long? Are they good for your teeth and gums? Do they damage your tooth structure? Often, people whiten their teeth with different products without really knowing what it is, the effectiveness, and do they have that long-term effect that everyone wants. If you’re anything like me, you strive for whiter teeth every day. I have been obsessed with whitening my teeth ever since I got my braces off 6 years ago. I have tried every method under the sun and have found positives and negatives about each one.

The first method I started out with were the whitening strips. I found these to be most convenient and affordable at a young age. I purchased the 60 pack of Crest White Strips at Costco for around 100 dollars. I started using them as soon as I got home! I found they were a little odd at first. Teeth whitening strips are clear, flimsy plastic that you place on your teeth and hope that they don’t slide or fall off so you won’t have to taste the yucky bleach. They are coated on one side with a film of hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent. You open a bottom strip, and a top strip and place them on your teeth. I found them to be a bit awkward because I felt like I had to keep my mouth open, and smiling the whole time so I wouldn’t swallow the bleach, or get it on anything but my teeth. The strips definitely made a difference, it just took a while. If you’re an impatient person like I am, this is not the route to go.

Another option I tried was ordering trays online that you boil and then shape them to your teeth. Let me tell you one thing before I continue, DO NOT WASTE YOUR MONEY ON THIS. They do not work, and are the most frustrating things on the planet. Trying to boil something, and put it into your mouth right after, HURTS! They didn’t mold correctly, and they were uncomfortable. I had a hard time having them in my mouth for an hour each day. I just couldn’t do it anymore. After about 2 weeks of no difference in my teeth what-so-ever. Definitely recommend steering clear of an online order for bleach trays.

I am an aspiring Dental Hygienist. I have a passion for teeth, and have had that passion ever since I would beg my friends to allow me pull their teeth out when I was 5 years old. Teeth are a big deal in my life. I started working in a dental office about 7 months ago while I go to school for Dental Hygiene. While working there, I have been introduced to a whole new world of whitening. I have learned more about whitening then I have ever hoped. The first week of working, I purchased the custom trays. Let me just say this before I continue, this has been the best decision I have ever made (next to some other life altering choices). The trays are affordable and range depending on the office, mine were obviously at a discounted price being an employee of the practice. These trays are custom, like I said. Getting set up does take the most time by far, but the results are more than worth the time invested. First you come in for impressions, usually later that day we have the trays ready for you. The material we use comes in a prefilled syringe like tube which makes it easier to apply in the bleach trays. The syringes contain 16% hydrogen peroxide which is more than enough to remove those stubborn stains, or even effects of tetracycline use (see previous blog). I have a bonded tooth that can sometimes get a little discolored, and what I love most about this bleach is that it makes a huge difference even on my bonded tooth. The best thing about custom trays is that they are comfortable, and you only have to use a little bit of gel, so when you put the trays in, they aren’t over flowing with bleach making it awkward to close your mouth. I wore my trays consistently for one hour every night for 7 days and saw a huge difference. The trays are a good choice if you’re the type of person that wants results fast and loves convenience at a reasonable cost. The only downside to this method of whitening is that when you put too much bleach in your trays and it makes contact with your gums, it may cause a little bit of discomfort or a little bit of pain. But other than that, this is my go to whitening!

My office, as well as many other dentist offices offer in office whitening. It is a one day office visit, pain-free, short chair time procedure, with lasting results. This is by far the most popular procedure. It is popular because of the long-lasting effects. You have one visit, and your teeth are up to 7 shades lighter. A lot of people are very hesitant of in office whitening due to the fact that they are afraid their teeth may become sensitive. With the in office procedure, 4 separate tubes of whitening are applied to your teeth over an hour period in 15 minutes intervals there is little to no sensitivity.

All of this talk about whitening leads me to my most exciting discovery. In talking about my pursuit for excellence in whitening around the office, I discovered that my office participates in an annual Zoom Whitening campaign called Smiles for Life. Smiles for Life is a whitening campaign partnered with the Crown Council that whitens teeth on a donation basis. During March – June of every year my office joined with Philips Oral Health makers of ZOOM whiten teeth and all the proceeds go directly to charity, 50% of proceeds benefit national children’s charities, 50% benefit a charity of our choice – Hope Arising, visit http://www.smilesforlife.org for more details. Hope Arising is a sustainable organization that helps people of Ethiopia, we work very closely with Hope Arising , even traveling to Africa twice a year to aid in their stabilization efforts. While in Ethiopia we provide dental services to those in need as well as aid in other efforts to stabilize agriculture and water delivery systems to local villages, visit http://www.hopearising.org for more details or information on how you can help. In the 2012 Smiles for Life campaign we raised over $10,000 and donated approximately $5,000 to Hope Arising, were hoping for an even more successful 2013.

Different whitening methods apply to different people. You may love the strips, and hate the trays. You may love the in office whitening and hate everything else. These are just some of Cassie’s (me) tips to whiter teeth! And for a good cause, too  If you need any more information on whitening, please feel free to email me at appt@shalimarfamilydentistry.com or call me at (480)838-3355. I am very reachable by both.teeth-whiteningpress_release_distribution_0301198_57938

Bad Breath? No Problem!

Do you suffer from bad breath? Does it linger with you throughout the day and you just can’t get rid of it? Don’t be embarrassed, you and the 40 million Americans are not alone.

Halitosis, also more commonly known as bad breath occurs when unpleasant odors are exhaled through the mouth. In most cases, bad breath originates from the mouth. One of the most common causes of bad breath is the build-up of plaque. When people don’t floss, or brush as much as they should, the plaque then begins to harbor bacteria resulting in bad breath, even if you just brushed your teeth! Some symptoms to be on the look out for bad breath are; smell, bad taste or taste changes in your mouth, dry mouth, and a coating on your tongue.

 Most causes of bad breath are due to inadequate oral hygiene. If good oral hygiene practices, or a dentist do no eliminate bad breath, you should consult your physician. Very few causes of bad breath may need medical attention from a physician. When to seek that type of medical attention is when you have a persistent dry mouth, sores in the mouth, pain with chewing or swallowing, white spots on the tonsils, fever,  or just started a new medication. New parents need to watch their babies or young children because bad breath may be a sign of infection or undiagnosed medical problem.

If your bad breath is a result of poor oral hygiene, here are a few tips to help your teeth stay healthy, and smelling clean!

  • brush twice a day with toothpaste containing fluoride
  • brush teeth after meals, especially meals that contain foods high in acid
  • replace your toothbrush every 2 months, this helps your overall health as well. This way you won’t keep putting the same bad bacteria in your mouth over and over again.
  • make sure you are seeing a dentist twice a year for your regular cleanings and check-ups to avoid any problems that might be brewing in your mouth
  • brush your tongue regularly, it really makes a huge difference
  • make sure you are flossing regularly so those food particles that get stuck in between your teeth don’t harbor bacteria
  • keep your mouth moist and wet by drinking lots of water! It’s not a bad idea to make it a habit to drink more water throughout the day because your overall health also benefits from it! Who doesn’t love a 2 for 1 special?

Don’t be embarrassed if you have bad breath, just remember you aren’t alone. Try the tips suggested above, and if they don’t work, come in and see a dentist. We want you to be comfortable, and our number one goal is to see you walk out the door with happy smiles!

badbreath