I am Sick, Should I Go to the Dentist?

Sharma RDH

Sharma Mulqueen, RDH

I am Sick, Should I Go to the Dentist?

Working in the dental field for twenty years I have seen many patients unsure if they should cancel their dental appointment due to not feeling good.  Many are concerned because they are unsure if it’s going to get worse or not.  Most offices charge a late fee if the appointment is not cancelled within a 48 hours’ notice.  Should I cancel or just go in for my appointment?

The biggest question “Do I have the flu?” It’s not always obvious how infectious you are to others. Also, it’s hard to know if you have the flu or a cold early on with your symptoms. The best thing you can do is take your temperature and monitor it.  If it continues to rise, more than likely you have the flu.

Center for disease control states the symptoms of the flu are fever, chills, fatigue, body aches, sore throat, and headache are common symptoms of flu. Not everyone with flu will have a fever. The flu can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. The flu is different from a cold. The flu usually comes on suddenly.

If a patient is suffering from flu-like symptoms, we recommended that you reschedule your appointment.  The flu, or influenza, is spread from an infected person through small particles released into the air when you sneeze or cough; even talking may release small particles into the air. A single sneeze may infect numerous people.  Not only can you infect other patients, but you can also spread the infection to the dental staff.  Dental professionals work in direct contact with fluids in the mouth so if you’re infected, they may get the virus. Although they engage in frequent hand-washing and barriers such as: gloves, masks and eyewear to protect themselves from infectious diseases, these are not foolproof.

Be sure to phone the dental office and explain why you need to reschedule. Some offices appreciate that you’re considering their health and the health of other patients and will waive the fee if you’re not a frequent offender.  When in doubt, ask your dental office if the visit should be cancelled.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

 

Sources:

http://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease/symptoms.htm

http://www.AmericanDentalAssociation.com

Is Your Toothbrush Making you Sick?

Sharma RDH

Sharma Mulqueen RDH

Is Your Toothbrush Making you Sick?

Everyone’s focusing on the hand washing when they’re sick, with good reason. But how about washing your toothbrush? Washing your hands can reduce the risk of illness since we put our hands in our mouths, our eyes, our ears. So why is there no focus on cleaning the toothbrush during illness when we stick it directly into our mouths? What can we do to prevent the germs from passing on?

Reintroducing that toothbrush back into your mouth could be the worst thing you could be doing for your health on a daily basis.

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That doesn’t mean don’t brush.

Many studies clearly state that all of the presently available toothbrushes have the ability to be infected by a wide range of microorganisms, including viruses which can cause the common cold to even herpes. Pneumonia-causing bacteria also are found on a toothbrush.

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What can you do?

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), a simple regimen for toothbrush care is sufficient to remove most microorganisms from your toothbrush and limit the spread of disease. Here are some common-sense steps you can take:

  • Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and warm water before and after brushing or flossing.
  • After brushing, rinse your toothbrush with warm water and store it upright to air-dry.
  • Don’t cover your toothbrush or place it in a closed container until it is completely dry. A moist environment can foster bacterial growth.
  • Use a completely dry toothbrush. Everyone should have two toothbrushes to give ample time (24 hours) for it to dry out in between uses.
  • Don’t share a toothbrush with anyone. Also, don’t store toothbrushes in a way that might cause them to touch and spread germs.
  • Replace your toothbrush every three or four months. Dentists recommend this practice not as prevention against contamination, but because toothbrushes wear out and become less effective at cleaning teeth.
  • Always replace your toothbrush after a cold or other illness to prevent contamination.
  • If you or someone else in your family is sick, that person should use a different tube of toothpaste (travel size, for example), to prevent spreading germs to other toothbrushes.
  • The toothbrush should be viewed as a necessary evil as well as a bio hazard. Make sure it is clean before using it!

In summary, do not reuse your floss, keep your toothbrush clean, and replace during and after illness. Store it outside the bathroom and use it several times per day. Brush twice a day for two minutes and floss daily and see your dentist every six months for check ups!

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

https://www.deltadentalins.com/oral_health/toothbrush.html

http://guidetodentistry.com

http://www.cdc.gov/oralhealth/infectioncontrol

Spheno Palatine Gangleonerualgia

Kim McCrady

Kim McCrady RDH BA

Spheno Palatine Gangleonerualgia

Spheno Palatine Gangleoneuralgia!  Now that’s a mouthful.  But believe it or not, most everyone has experienced spheno patlatine gangleoneuralgia at one time or another.  In fact, as scary as the condition sounds, its uncomfortable but harmless.

So, what causes spheno palatine gangleoneuralgia?  It is the rapid release of blood back to the brain back from the palate after something very cold has been present in the mouth and contacted the roof of the mouth.  This results in a sharp uncomfortable headache.  Fortunately, the headache does not last long.  Have you figured it out yet?  What is spheno palatine gangleoneuralgia?  If you guessed a good old fashioned brain freeze, you are correct.

The roof of our mouths are made up of a hard area, referred to as the hard palate.  Your hard palate is located toward the front of the mouth and extends to the about the middle of the second molars.  It is hard because there are three bones that fused together as you grew to create the hard palate.  The soft palate is located just behind the hard palate and continues down into the throat area.  It is soft because there are no bones present.  The brain freeze according to recent studies is caused by an intense and sudden increase in blood flow through the brain’s anterior cerebral artery due to dilation of the artery.  When the artery constricted, the brain-freeze pain sensation wears off.

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Of course, allowing your cold treat a moment to warm up before it contacts your palate is a start to preventing brain freeze.  But, if your brain freeze is underway the quicker you can warm your palate the quicker the headache will recede.  Cupping you hand like a mask around your mouth and breathing in and out into your cupped hand helps to warm the palate.  As well has pressing your tongue or thumb on the roof of the mouth can shorten that headache. The goal is to prevent the blood vessels in your palate from constricting and dilating due to extreme changes in temperature.

Next time you are in need of a conversation starter, consider asking your friends if they have ever experienced spheno palatine gangleoneuralgia.

Medical News Today:  http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/244458.php

Discovery Fit and Health: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/244458.php

Photo: http://robjundt.hubpages.com/hub/Brain-Freeze-Adventures