Oh goodness, what do I do with my knocked-out tooth?

Sharma Mulqueen RDH

Oh goodness, what do I do with my knocked-out tooth?

A knocked-out tooth can be a surprise, but it can be more than that if you don’t take action quickly. A broken or chipped tooth can also constitute a dental emergency, but a knocked-out tooth demands an immediate appointment. The importance of caring for your tooth, handling your tooth after it’s been knocked out and cleaning it is very important to return it to its original position.

Handling the Tooth with Care

After you have noticed that one of your teeth has been knocked out of your mouth, the first step is to handle it with care. If you want your dentist to be able to salvage your natural tooth and quickly repair your oral health, you’ll need to handle the knocked-out tooth correctly. Make sure you don’t touch its root and instead handle it by its crown. If you touch the root, you might damage the tooth and minimize your chances of having it placed back in its socket.

Cleaning and Repositioning

If your tooth has been knocked into dirt, mud, covered in blood or the ground in general, it’s a good idea to clean it while you wait to see your emergency dentist. Start by rinsing your dislodged tooth with water. Remember hold it by the crown and avoid using soap to clean your tooth, and don’t dry it off when you’re done cleaning it either. If you replace your tooth quickly, you might be able to salvage it by inserting it into its original socket. Although, inserting it is not always successful, it is recommended to try and place it. If this is not possible, you’ll have to store it safely.

Storing and Visiting the Dentist

When you find yourself in need of emergency dental care but you cannot immediately see your dentist, you should store your tooth in milk or inside your mouth. Call one of our Signature Dental offices to get scheduled with the Dentist as soon as you can to maintain your oral health.

Sources:

www.deltadentalma.com

www.colgate.com

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How to Clean Your Denture/Partial Denture

LindsayW

Lindsay Olsen, RDH

How to Clean Your Denture/Partial Denture 

Rinse your dentures before brushing to remove any loose food or debris.

Use a soft bristle toothbrush and a non-abrasive cleanser to gently brush all the surfaces of the dentures so they don’t get scratched.

When brushing, clean your mouth thoroughly—including your gums, cheeks, roof of your mouth and tongue to remove any plaque. This can help reduce the risk of oral irritation and bad breath.

When you’re not wearing your dentures, put them in a safe place covered in water to keep them from warping.

Do not sleep with your dentures. Your tissues need to breath overnight. If you do not take out your dentures at night, you are at risk of developing oral fungal infections.

Occasionally, denture wearers may use adhesives. Adhesives come in many forms: creams, powders, pads/wafers, strips or liquids. If you use one of these products, read the instructions, and use them exactly as directed. Your dentist can recommend appropriate cleansers and adhesives; look for products with the ADA Seal of Acceptance. Products with the ADA Seal have been evaluated for safety and effectiveness.

Visit your dentist once every 6 months for a complimentary oral cancer screening, and to have the fit of your denture evaluated.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Invisalign

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Amanda Orvis, RDH

INVISALIGN

Invisalign is a uniquely designed orthodontic treatment developed to correct mild to severe cases of malocclusion, including crowding, protruding or crooked teeth, overbites and/or underbites. Invisalign is an affordable option for correcting most dental malocclusion problems.

WHAT MAKES INVISALIGN DIFFERENT?

You may be asking yourself, what is the difference between Invisalign and traditional braces? With Invisalign you can achieve very similar if not the same outcomes as traditional braces. The advantages of Invisalign are the comfort, flexibility, and ease of access to properly care for your teeth without having brackets, wires or rubber bands in your mouth.

Invisalign uses a series of aligners to straighten your teeth over the course of your treatment. Aligners are smooth plastic trays that you wear over your teeth. Each set of aligners is worn for a few weeks before changing to a new set.

ADVANTAGES

The great thing about Invisalign is that there are no personal sacrifices in terms of food! You do not have to give up popcorn, chips, bagels, pizza crust, pretzels, nuts, apples, carrots, or corn on the cob. Fortunately, Invisalign aligners are removable, therefore allowing you to eat and drink as well as brush and floss your teeth as you would normally do. The aligners are worn for 20-22 hours a day while they gradually move your teeth into their correct positions. The aligners should only be removed to eat as well as brush and floss your teeth.

HEALTHIER TEETH AND GUMS

Often times crowding or malocclusion issues can lead to swollen, red, bleeding gums. These are signs of periodontal disease. By properly aligning the teeth, inflammation is reduced, allowing your gum tissue to fit properly around the teeth. This provides a defense against potential periodontal problems.

Food debris and plaque build-up can lead to tooth decay. In order to maintain strong healthy teeth, simply remove your aligners and brush and floss as you would normally do. Try to avoid eating and/or drinking while your aligners are in your mouth.

THE INVISALIGN PROCESS

  • Talk to your dentist about your interest in Invisalign.
  • Your dentist will take impressions and photos and send them off to Invisalign. A customized treatment plan will be created just for you.
  • After your treatment plan is created, you will then go into your dental office for a brief viewing of a virtual presentation of your anticipated final outcomes.
  • Upon your approval of your anticipated outcomes, Invisalign then fabricates your series of aligners and sends them to your dental office.
  • Your dental office will then call you to schedule an appointment for you to come in and receive your first set of aligners.
  • Over the course of your Invisalign treatment you will change out your aligners every few weeks.
  • After the completion of all of your aligners, retainers are then made to keep your teeth in their new positions to keep that new smile looking great.

We look forward to helping you create that new smile that you have always wanted.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

http://www.invisalign.com/how-invisalign-works

http://happytoothnc.com/braces-vs-invisalign/

 

IV Sedation Dentistry

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Andra Mahoney, BS RDH

IV Sedation Dentistry

It is very common that people are nervous at the dentist office.  While we do everything we can to make your appointments run quickly and smoothly, sometimes people need a little extra help.  We offer several different options to make your appointments easier.  If applicable, you can be prescribed a medication to help calm your nerves.  You can be given Nitrous Oxide, also know as laughing gas.  And finally, IV conscious sedation.  All of our Signature Dental Offices offer IV sedation dentistry.

What is IV Sedation?

IV stands for intravenous. Medication is administered through the veins and because of its rapid effects, many patients prefer this option.

How does IV Sedation work?

IV sedation medication is delivered through a very small needle placed in either the top of your hand or within your inner elbow.

Some people have a fear of needles, that is not uncommon.  Due to that, some patients are not able to tolerate IV sedation. However, most people describe the sensation as a small pinch or prick. Also, dentists can further reduce the feeling by giving you an oral sedative beforehand and/or applying a topical anesthetic where the needle will be placed.

What are the benefits to IV sedation?

Just like other forms of sedation dentistry, IV sedation is designed to relax you and make you completely comfortable. IV sedation also eliminates your anxiety and pain. Although you may lie back in the dental chair with your eyes closed, you will not be asleep during your appointment and will still be able to respond to verbal cues from your dentist. Because you are completely relaxed, your dentist can accomplish more high-quality dentistry in less time. IV sedation can benefit you if you have a sensitive gag reflex or difficulty sitting in a dental chair for long periods of time. You’ll be so relaxed that you’ll be unaware of the sights, smells, and sounds of the dental office. Patients remember little-to-nothing of their appointment by the next day.

IV sedation gives your dentist optimal control of the amount of medication administered and allows them to readily increase or decrease your level of sedation as needed, quickly and comfortably.

An additional benefit of IV sedation includes faster onset of the sedation medications, meaning you’ll be able to feel the effects of the medication quickly.

What dental procedures are recommended for IV sedation?

Mainly, people prefer to use it for taking out wisdom teeth and appointments that need to have a lot of treatment accomplished in one sitting.  Those that have high dental anxiety also prefer IV sedation.  However, IV sedation can be an option for any treatment that needs to done!

What is the recovery time after IV sedation?

There is no set amount of recovery time because every patient is different. However, many patients begin to feel more alert soon after the IV medication is stopped. You should not drive or operate heavy machinery for at least 24 hours after the end of your appointment. If you experience any nausea after treatment, your dentist can usually provide a prescription to help. Patients are encouraged to sleep and drink plenty of water and clear fluids for the remainder of the day. In regards to recovery from the actual dental work itself, your dentist will give you individualized instructions for aftercare. Many sedation patients report significantly reduced pain levels the day after their treatment. There are multiple theories for why this is, but the common thought is that because a sedation patient is relaxed and not tense during their appointment, the dentist can often use less force as well as access the mouth more easily.

Does Dental Insurance cover IV sedation?

Patients have different insurance plans, so there is no single answer. Generally speaking, most dental insurance plans do cover part or sometimes even all of the cost of IV sedation. It’s best to check with your insurance provider prior to your appointment to confirm your plan’s benefits.

If this is something that interests you, your dentist can review your particular needs and your medical history to see if you are a good candidate.

 

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

http://evsedation.com

Halloween Sugar Facts

KatieM

Katie Moynihan, BS RDH

Halloween Sugar Facts

Happy Halloween! Although Halloween is a fun holiday to dress up in your favorite costume, it also comes with consuming large amounts of candy and sugar. According to the US Census Bureau, the average American eats 25 pounds of candy every year with most of that consumed during Halloween time. All that sugar hidden in a small piece of candy can add up quickly. If you or your child eats 12 treats, that is equivalent to about 30 packets of sugar. It is important to take a closer look at the nutritional facts before indulging as it is guaranteed to spook you!

Halloween Candy Comparison

  • Almond Joy, Snack Size – 80 calories, 8 g sugar
  • Butterfinger, Fun Size – 100 calories, 10 g sugar
  • Gummie Bears (Haribo) – 8 pieces, around 65 calories, 21 g sugar
  • Heath Bar, Snack Size – 76 calories, 9 g sugar
  • Hershey Kisses – Average 25 calories, 2-3 g sugar each kiss
  • Hershey’s Miniature Bars – Average 42 calories, 4 g sugar each bar
  • Jolly Rancher – a serving of three Jolly Ranchers is 70 calories, 11 g of sugar.
  • Kit Kat, Fun size – 60 calories, 6 g sugar
  • Peanut M & Ms –  Snack Sixe – 5 g of fat and 9 g of sugar.
  • Almond Joy – Fun Size – 80 calories for a mini-Almond Joy or Mounds.
  • Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup, Snack Size – 110 calories, 11 g sugar per peanut butter cup
  • Skittles, Fun Size – 60 calories, 11 g sugar
  • Smarties – 1 roll, 25 calories, 6 g sugar
  • Snickers, Fun Size – 80 calories, 4 g of fat and 8 g of sugar
  • Sour Patch Kids, Mini Bag – 50 calories, 10 g sugar
  • Starburst, Fun Size – 2 candies, 40 calories, 6 g sugar
  • Three Musketeers Minis – 64 calories, 2 g of fat and 11 g of sugar
  • Tootsie Pops & Charms Blow Pops – 60 calories, 13 g of sugar.
  • Twix Minis, 1 bar – 50 calories, 5 g sugar
  • Twizzlers (Strawberry Twists) – 2 pieces, 50 calories and 6 g sugar

We all know it is nearly impossible to avoid Halloween candy altogether; however, there are some simple ways in which you can minimize the sugar overload after trick-or-treating is over. Always be sure to brush away the treats! Whether your child eats one piece of candy or ten, it is important to brush properly to prevent tooth decay. Make a candy plan to avoid going overboard with candy consumption. Set a limit on the number of candy that can be eaten each day, or a limit on the number of houses that they can visit. A candy swap is a great way to let your child enjoy the fun of trick-or-treating without overloading on sweets. You can trade small amounts of candy for a non-sugar reward such as a toy or sticker. We hope these tips will get you on track to a happier and healthier Halloween!

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/conditions/cavities/article/how-to-prevent-cavities-from-halloween-candy-1013

http://www.childrenshospitaloakland.org/main/news/halloween-candy-calorie-and-sugar-comparison-212.aspx

Dentures and Partial Dentures

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Amanda Orvis, RDH

Dentures and Partial Dentures

Removable dental appliances such as dentures and partial dentures require daily care as well as regular dental visits to keep them functioning properly. Denture and partial denture wearers need to pay close attention to the health of their mouths. Mouths should be brushed with a soft-bristled toothbrush at least twice a day, with or without teeth present. Partial denture wearers should pay close attention to the remaining teeth that their partials fit on to. Plaque and food debris can become trapped on or near the clasps that keep the dentures in place, and that plaque can lead to tooth decay or other dental issues.

Caring for Dentures or Partial Dentures

  • Remove and rinse dentures or partials after eating.
  • Rinse your mouth after removing your dentures.
  • Gently clean your dentures or partials at least once a day using a non-abrasive denture cleaner or mild dish soap. Avoid using toothpaste on your dentures as they are too abrasive and can cause small imperfections in your denture that can trap plaque and bacteria.
  • Soak your dentures overnight to keep them moist and to retain their correct shape. Always follow the instructions on the soaking solutions.
  • Always rinse your dentures after soaking them before putting them back into your mouth.
  • Maintain regular dental visits. Talk with your dentist or dental hygienist about the proper interval for your dental visits.

If you have any questions or concerns about your dentures or partial dentures, please call our office and schedule an appointment.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Myths of Dentistry

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Cortney Davis, RDH

Myths of Dentistry

 It’s no myth that to some dental work can be scary sometimes. Statistics show that around 12 percent of the population in the U.S. says they are anxious when it comes to visiting the dentist, and many don’t know how to take care of their oral health properly. With the overwhelming anxiety and stress build up around dentists and dental health, it’s not shocking that people may have made up or heard several dental myths over the years. People then tend to believe these myths and decide not go to the dentist regularly, rather than find out the truth. Having false information can be harmful to your health, so let’s talk about some of the common myths which you may believe yourself or have heard.

Myth #1- As long as I brush my teeth twice a day or don’t have tooth pain, I don’t need to go to the dentist.

Fact: While brushing twice a day and flossing once daily is Important, it is not enough. It is also important to get routine cleanings. During cleanings, the hygienist will clean the hard to reach areas, will make sure your gums are healthy, and will educate patients on proper home care. Dentists will also use x-rays and visual exams to make sure a patient doesn’t have any problems with their teeth or gums. Many don’t know this, but you don’t always have tooth pain when you have a tooth problem or gum disease, and if left untreated a tooth problem and unhealthy gum tissue will only get worse and lead to more serious problems. That’s why it is so important to come in for routine check-ups.

Myth #2 The dentist only wants my money

Fact: While some dental procedures and treatments can seem costly, they are completely worth it. As stated above, if dental problems are left untreated for a period, the treatment needed typically becomes more extensive which will cost more than a simple cleaning every six months. If a dentist can catch the signs of infection early, treatment will be minimal and less costly.

Myth #3 Bleaching your teeth can damage them.

Fact: Bleaching is a popular service that allows patients to get whiter smiles faster. Scientific studies have shown that using peroxide to whiten teeth is both safe and efficient. Although bleaching can cause some sensitivity when a patient is using it, bleaching gel is safe concerning damage of the structure of teeth; it merely makes teeth whiter and brighter.

Myth #4. If gums are bleeding, brushing and flossing should be avoided. 

Fact: The exact opposite is true. Regular brushing and flossing are essential to remove plaque build-up which causes bleeding gums.   Bleeding gums is a sign of gum brokerage, and more care actually must be done to avoid worse oral problems.

Myth #5 Baby teeth aren’t important, they will fall out anyway.

Fact: Yes, eventually all of your child’s 20 baby teeth will fall out eventually. However, many serve important functions for your child’s development. Baby teeth are known as the natural space maintainers for adult teeth and if a child loses a tooth too early due to dental problems, they could cause crowding for adult teeth. The health of your child’s baby teeth can also affect the health of their adult teeth. If you leave dental decay in a baby tooth untreated, it could eventually cause your child pain, abscesses, swelling, and affect the adult tooth developing under the baby tooth. Also, if the infection got worse it could even spread to other parts of the child’s body.

Myth #6 I shouldn’t go to the dentist because I am pregnant

Fact: A dental check-up is recommended during pregnancy. Although many women make it nine months with no dental discomfort, pregnancy can make conditions worse or create new ones due to hormonal changes and changes in eating habits. Regular checkups and good dental health habits can help keep you and your baby healthy. Local anesthetics and x-rays are okay during pregnancy although they are to be done only when necessary.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

http://www.pediatricdentistrichmond.com/downloads/Top10Myths_Childrens_Teeth.pdf

http://www.stlawrencedentistry.com/top-10-dental-myths/

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/pregnancy/concerns

http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/oral-care/problems/5-common-dental-myths.htm

The Panoramic X-Ray Gives Dentists the Big Picture

Sharma RDH

Sharma Mulqueen RDH

The Panoramic X-Ray Gives Dentists the Big Picture

One advantage of the panoramic X-ray is its ease of use. Unlike other X-rays where the film is placed inside the patient’s mouth, the panoramic film is contained in a machine that moves around the patient’s head. Some people may be familiar with the panoramic X-ray because it is usually taken when the wisdom teeth are being evaluated. The X-ray will also reveal deep cavities and bone loss.  The panoramic X-ray has many other applications, including evaluating patients with past or present TMJ jaw joint problems; those who require full or partial removable dentures and partials; those who are at risk or suspected of having oral cancer or other tumors of the jaw, have impacted teeth such as wisdom teeth or have had any recent trauma to the face or teeth.

The panoramic X-ray can also identify some not so common problems, such as calcification within the carotid artery that may indicate the potential for a stroke. In one situation, my father-in-law had not been to the dentist in several years.  I referred him to my Friday office so he would be comfortable with another Dental Hygienist.  Full mouth series of X-rays, Panoramic X-ray, and charting were completed.    After the Dentist reviewed the panoramic X-ray it revealed a Bi-lateral calcification of the carotid artery.

pano

The Dentist asked when the last time he was at his cardiologist.  He stated he was there yesterday and everything looked good according to his Doctor.   After discussing his findings he referred him back to his cardiologist for a follow up appointment.  After calling the Cardiologist office they got him in the following day and a test was done a week later.  The test revealed a 50% blockage on the left side.  To treat the blockage there are a few options.  Treat with medication, perform carotid angioplasty (a thin tube with a balloon on the end is threaded to the narrowed or blocked carotid artery) or Carotid Endarterectomy (a surgeon makes an incision in the neck and removes plaque buildup from a carotid artery, which helps restore normal blood flow through the artery. My father-in-law is in the early stages of these findings. He will have one more test to determine treatment.

The panoramic X-ray captures more than just the teeth. Normally, you don’t see the carotid artery on a panoramic X-ray because it doesn’t have any calcium in it and it’s like other soft tissue.  If there’s calcification in the carotid artery, then it will stand out.  It is recommended that if your Dentist notices this on your Panoramic X-ray, they should refer you to the appropriate specialists for further evaluation and treatment.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Source:

http://www.dentistry.com

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

https://www.nhlbi.com

 

Dental Fears

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Becky Larson, RDH

 

Dental Fears

I once had an elementary school teacher who would scream if she heard the word “dentist.”  About 75% of the population has some form of dental anxiety while about 5-10% of the population has an actual dental phobia.  There are various degrees of dental anxiety/phobia, some even requiring psychiatric help.  Those who experience this fear of going to the dentist will often avoid dental appointments until they are in extreme pain.  I think we all realize that sometimes going to the dentist is just not fun.  However, some signs that you may suffer from legitimate dental anxiety/phobia include trouble sleeping the night before a dental appointment, nervous feelings that increase in the dental office waiting room, crying or feeling physically sick when thinking about the dentist, and/or panic attacks or difficulty breathing when at or thinking of the dentist.

So what causes dental anxiety or dental phobia?  Some common reasons for experiencing dental anxiety are fear of pain, fear of injections, fear that injections won’t work, fear of anesthetic side effects, fear of not being in control, embarrassment, and loss of personal space.  The key to dealing with any of these fears is to talk to your dentist.  If your dentist is aware of your fear(s) he/she can suggest ways to make you feel more comfortable when in the dental chair.  Some helpful strategies include:

  • Having your dentist explain procedures in detail prior to and during treatment
  • Topical anesthetic and/or closing your eyes during injections
  • Establish a “stop” signal when you want your dentist to stop or give you a break
  • Nitrous oxide prior to treatment
  • Prescription pre-medication (such as Halcion)
  • Sedation/general anesthesia

Here in our Signature Dental offices, we do offer intravenous sedation techniques for dental treatment.  With these techniques, sedation drugs are administered through an IV in the patient’s arm or hand.  While the patient is sedated, they will still be still be conscious and able to respond to dental staff.  They will also be able to breathe on their own.

Recognizing dental fears and finding ways to cope with them is extremely important to your dental health.  Regular check-ups and cleanings can help prevent recurrent decay, which in turn can reduce the amount of time and money you spend at the dentist.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/easing-dental-fear-adults

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dental_phobia

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/Oral-and-Dental-Health-Basics/Checkups-and-Dental-Procedures/The-Dental-Visit/article/What-is-Dental-Anxiety-and-Phobia.cvsp

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=dnetal+anxiety&FORM=HDRSC2

What is a Filling?

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Cortney Davis , RDH

What is a Filling?

A filling is a way to restore a tooth that has been damaged by decay back to its normal function and shape. Fillings also can be used to treat teeth that are broken, cracked, or been worn down by misuse (such as tooth grinding)

How do I know if I need a filling?

There are many indications you may need a dental filling. They include; a toothache, sharp pain, a rough tooth, a dark spot or hole you can see or feel, food getting stuck in between your teeth, floss getting caught when flossing, or a chipped tooth. Many believe that you have to be in pain to have a dental problem. Sadly, this is often not the case. Dental decay has the inconvenient trait of being almost painless or mildly painless in its early stages. Generally, dental decay becomes painful over time if it hits the nerve. At that point, a filling is not possible, and a more extensive and costly procedure like an extraction or root canal is required.

How will the dentist determine if I need a filling?

There are several different ways a dentist will determine if you need a filling. The first way is to take x-rays of your teeth.  X-rays can show decay developing in the enamel on the sides of the teeth that come together. Secondly, the dentist will observe your teeth. You can’t always see cavities on an x-ray, so your dentist will observe your teeth visually. Your dentist will use an instrument to probe for tooth decay. Teeth that are healthy will be hard and will resist pressure to the instrument. Teeth that are decayed will be softer and will have a stick in the affected area.

What are the types of fillings?

1)    Composite (resin) fillings-Most commonly used today, composites are fillings that are matched to the same color as your teeth and used where a natural appearance is desired.

2)    Amalgam (silver) fillings- Amalgam fillings are made up of a mixture of mercury, silver, tin, and copper. They are durable and resistant to wear. But because of their dark appearance they are usually not used in visible areas. Many people think that amalgam fillings are unsafe and want to replace them. There is no evidence that amalgam fillings can cause a problem and should only be replaced if there is recurring decay or if the tooth is broken or worn down.

3)    Gold fillings- are made to order in a laboratory and then cemented into place. Gold fillings are very durable and may last more than 20 years, but are often the most expensive.

What is the process of a filling?

If it is determined you need a dental filling your dentist will numb the tooth and remove all the decay and clean the area that is affected. The cleaned out area then will be filled with a material described above, typically a composite filling.

So remember,

If you have been told in the past you need fillings or think you may need a filling, please don’t delay! Teeth problems will not miraculously heal and delaying treatment can lead to larger problems, more time in the dental chair, and more expensive treatment.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/procedures/fillings/article/what-is-a-filling

http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/procedures/fillings/article/fillings-the-basics

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/dental-health-fillings