Oh goodness, what do I do with my knocked-out tooth?

Sharma Mulqueen RDH

Oh goodness, what do I do with my knocked-out tooth?

A knocked-out tooth can be a surprise, but it can be more than that if you don’t take action quickly. A broken or chipped tooth can also constitute a dental emergency, but a knocked-out tooth demands an immediate appointment. The importance of caring for your tooth, handling your tooth after it’s been knocked out and cleaning it is very important to return it to its original position.

Handling the Tooth with Care

After you have noticed that one of your teeth has been knocked out of your mouth, the first step is to handle it with care. If you want your dentist to be able to salvage your natural tooth and quickly repair your oral health, you’ll need to handle the knocked-out tooth correctly. Make sure you don’t touch its root and instead handle it by its crown. If you touch the root, you might damage the tooth and minimize your chances of having it placed back in its socket.

Cleaning and Repositioning

If your tooth has been knocked into dirt, mud, covered in blood or the ground in general, it’s a good idea to clean it while you wait to see your emergency dentist. Start by rinsing your dislodged tooth with water. Remember hold it by the crown and avoid using soap to clean your tooth, and don’t dry it off when you’re done cleaning it either. If you replace your tooth quickly, you might be able to salvage it by inserting it into its original socket. Although, inserting it is not always successful, it is recommended to try and place it. If this is not possible, you’ll have to store it safely.

Storing and Visiting the Dentist

When you find yourself in need of emergency dental care but you cannot immediately see your dentist, you should store your tooth in milk or inside your mouth. Call one of our Signature Dental offices to get scheduled with the Dentist as soon as you can to maintain your oral health.

Sources:

www.deltadentalma.com

www.colgate.com

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Save a Tooth, Save a Smile

JW9(sm)

Julie West BS RDH

I have had several nightmares about my teeth being knocked out.  I wake up in a panic to the relief that they are still there.  Losing a tooth to injury can be very scary, and those precious minutes following the displacement of the tooth are critical.  If you are a parent, a coach, or have any involvement with children, the following tips can equip you to save a smile.

saveatooth640x480www.saveatooth.com

Baby teeth 

If a child loses a baby tooth after injury, DO NOT attempt to put the tooth back into its socket.  Instead, place the tooth into a tooth saver like this one approved by the ADA.

If you do not have a tooth saver handy, a container of milk, water, or saline solution can be used.  DO NOT scrub/rinse the tooth clean!  Get the child to the dentist as soon as possible.  The faster the tooth can be reimplanted by a dentist, the better.

According to Martha Ann Keels, DDS, PhD, division chief of Pediatric Dentistry at Duke University, injuries to children’s teeth are both common and preventable.  She states, “The good news is most dental injuries can be avoided. But if an accident does occur, don’t worry –- most times even a tooth that’s been knocked out completely can be saved if proper care is taken in the first 20 minutes,” Keels said.

Time is of the essence.

Adult Teeth

If an adult or teenager loses an adult tooth after injury, DO put the tooth back into the socket immediately!   If the tooth has been soiled, gently rinse it with water being careful not to scrub/rinse off any attachments.  Hold the tooth by the crown and gently insert it into the socket.  Hold the tooth in the socket with clean cloth/ gauze until the adult can get to the dentist.

If it is not possible to reinsert the tooth (it is broken into several pieces), use a tooth saver container, milk, water, or saline solution to transport the pieces with the patient to the dentist as soon as possible.

There is no guarantee of long-term retention of a replanted tooth. A small percentage of replanted knocked-out teeth will be lost even with optimum treatment.

Bottom line: get the person and the preserved avulsed teeth to the dentist FAST!

Click here to view the tooth saver product pictured above.  I would encourage all parents, coaches, and school teachers to have a kit like this on-hand in case of dental trauma.  And, of course, all children playing sports should be wearing a mouthguard to help avoid such injuries.  See your dentist to have one made for your child.

www.ada.org

http://www.dukehealth.org/health_library/health_articles/dental_emergency_what_to_do_when_your_child_damages_a_tooth

http://www.prweb.com/releases/2012/7/prweb9734289.htm

Want to learn more? Visit us at http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com/