Fluoride: It’s Not Just for Kids

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Andra Mahoney BS RDH
Fluoride: It’s Not Just for Kids
 

When someone says fluoride, most of us automatically think children.  While it is true that fluoride is an important part of our children’s oral health, it is also a necessity for adults as well.  Adults, just like children, get cavities. So adults, just like children, should receive fluoride.  In fact, there are many age related problems that increase our need for fluoride.  Some examples include:

  • Eating disorders
  • Drug or Alcohol abuse
  • Lack of regular professional dental care
  • Poor Oral Hygiene
  • Exposed root surfaces of teeth, recession
  • Decreased salivary flow, resulting in dry mouth
  • Poor diet
  • Existing fillings
  • Tooth enamel defects
  • Undergoing head and neck radiation therapy

I’d like to address recession and dry mouth specifically, since those are very common problems.

 

Recession

Recession is when the gums have receded below the crown of the tooth, exposing the root to the tooth.

This creates two main problems. First, the roots of the teeth do not have enamel, they are covered by cementum.

As we all know, enamel is the hard material that protects the surface of the tooth. Enamel is 70 times stronger than cementum.  This, unfortunately, means that the roots of the teeth are more prone to decay than the crowns of the teeth.  The best recommendation for recession and the prevention of decay is fluoride.  Make sure you are using a soft bristled brush with soft brushing (to prevent further recession) in combination with fluoride toothpaste.  Also, you may received fluoride treatments at your dental appointments.  The most beneficial would be fluoride varnish.  Your hygienist is able to apply this for you at each appointment.  The varnish coats the tooth in a protective layer of fluoride to aid in the prevention of decay.

The second problem that recession creates is sensitivity.  When the root is exposed tiny little tubules open up on the tooth and the chances for sensitivity increase.  This makes eating or drinking cold or sweet things painful.  You will often notice a sharp zing when the area of recession comes in contact with cold or sweet items.  The best recommendation for sensitivity due to recession is fluoride.  Sensitivity toothpaste, such as Sensodyne, contain an increased amount of fluoride (as opposed to regular toothpaste) to assist in the prevention of sensitivity (and decay).

Fluoride varnish is also helpful as it coats the tooth and temporarily closes the tubules decreasing the sensitivity. 

Xerostomia

The last topic that I wanted to address is dry mouth, also known as xerostomia.  Many adults take medicine and the most common side effect of many medications is dry mouth.  A decrease in saliva increases your risk for decay.  Saliva is important in washing away bits of food, neutralizing acids created by bacteria, as well as containing minerals that help prevent tooth decay.  If you are having problems with dry mouth, try rinsing with a fluoride mouth was or a saliva substitute.
    

All these reasons and many more show the importance of fluoride use for adults.  If you have any other questions about the other problems that fluoride can help with, feel free to make an appointment with us and we’ll answer all your questions! 

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

Fluoride Treatments in the Dental Office ADA: http://www.ada.org/sections/scienceAndResearch/pdfs/patient_72.pdf

Can Fluoride Help Adults? Colgate: http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/Oral-and-Dental-Health-at-Any-Age/Adults/Adult-Maintenance-and-Care/article/Can-Fluoride-Help-Adults.cvsp

Recommendations for Using Fluoride to Prevent and Control Dental Caries in the United States CDC: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5014a1.htm

Adverse Effects of Not Replacing Missing Teeth

KatieM

Katie Sias, BS RDH

Adverse Effects of Not Replacing Missing Teeth

According to the American College of Prosthodontists, more than 35 million Americans do not have any teeth, and 178 million people in the United States are missing at least one tooth. Tooth loss occurs due to a number of issues such as decay, gum disease, injury, cancer, or wear. Your teeth are designed to work together to help you chew, speak, and smile. There are several tooth replacement options your Dentist may suggest depending on your needs such as implants, bridges, or dentures. However, do you know the risks of not replacing those missing teeth?

Bone Loss:

When a tooth is extracted or missing, bone loss can occur. The jawbone is preserved through the pressure and stimulation of chewing. When a tooth is missing, the bone resorbs and results in less density and width/height of the bone. Unfortunately, if left untreated for a long amount of time, the bone can start deteriorating around the adjacent teeth as well.

Shifting Teeth:

When a tooth is missing, the opposing tooth that is still there can often shift and super-erupt because it does not have a tooth to occlude with. Adjacent teeth can start drifting forward in the place of the missing teeth. These can cause a change in bite that will eventually affect your chewing and lead to more serious side effects.

TMJ Problems:

When your teeth shift out of alignment and your upper and lower jaws do not meet properly, it strains and damages the jaw joint. Muscle soreness may occur as you will tend to favor the other side of your mouth for chewing.

Periodontal Disease:

Missing teeth increase the risk of periodontal disease. When teeth shift out of alignment, it makes it harder to properly brush and floss those teeth.

Esthetics:

Missing teeth can affect the esthetics of your face. Many people feel less confident about their smile when they have gaps from missing teeth. If you are missing many teeth, the skin around your mouth loses support and will start to droop, which can make you appear older than you are.

Speak and Eat:

Missing teeth can alter the way you speak and eat. Depending on which teeth are missing, it may become difficult to bite and chew certain foods. Often times, you will most likely being overusing the other teeth to compensate for the missing tooth or teeth. You may develop a lisp or change in your ability to clearly pronounce certain works.

Most patients are unaware of the adverse effects of not replacing their missing teeth. Now that you know some of these risks, please consult your Dentist for the best replacement option for you!

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

https://www.gotoapro.org/facts-figures/

http://crowncouncil.com/why-replace-lost-teeth

https://www.perio.org/node/222

https://www.nobelbiocare.com/content/patient/international/en/home/missing-teeth/why-is-it-important-to-replace-missing-teeth-.html

Tooth Enamel

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Lora Cook, RDH

A closer look at tooth enamel.

Tooth enamel is one of the toughest structures of the human body, however it still needs protecting.  What exacting is tooth enamel?  It is the outer layer of your tooth and the hardest substance in your body.  Enamel is translucent and can stain from the food, drinks, smoking and chewing tobacco. Enamel cannot be regrown by our bodies.  Once it is chipped cracked or eroded or worn away it cannot be replaced naturally.

Signs of enamel problems.

Darkening:  As enamel wears away this can cause the tooth to become darker.

Sensitivity:  Your teeth may become hypersensitive to hot, cold, sweets or sour foods.

Notching:  There may be notching at the gum line

Cracks and chips:  Irregular or jagged tooth surfaces, also fracture lines can appear.

Protecting your enamel.

Custom night guard:

The power of our bite is incredible.  Out incisor can have 55 pounds of pressure or biting force, while our molars have 200 pounds of pressure.  Clenching and grinding your teeth during times of stress or at night while sleeping experts excess force and wear on your teeth. Over time you can literally grind away your enamel layer.  Ask your dentist about a custom night guard to protect your enamel for a lifetime.

MI Paste Plus:

This is not a tooth paste to brush your teeth with.  This is a paste to coat your teeth with in order to put minerals back into your enamel to help remineralize the enamel. MI Paste plus contains calcium, phosphate and 900ppm of fluoride.

“MI Paste and MI Paste Plus contain RECALDENT™ (CPP-ACP); Casein Phosphopeptide (CPP) are natural occurring molecules which are able to release calcium and phosphate ions and stabilize Amorphous Calcium Phosphate (ACP)”

These minerals helps to strengthen and remineralize the enamel.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

http://www.colgateenamelhealth.com/enamel-101/what-is-tooth-enamel

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/tooth-enamel-erosion-restoration#1

http://www.mi-paste.com/about.php

SMILES for HOPE

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Wendy Parker, RDH

SMILES for HOPE

Do you feel like you’re ready for a little change in your smile without spending a lot of money?  Well, look no further!  I know it sounds a little bit like a gimmick, but it’s true!  Whitening your smile, the professional way, can change your smile for just a small cost!  I know many of us have tried over the counter products and have come away frustrated or not seeing the difference, but in the next few months, you can use the best products out on the market to help you get results and help someone else in the meantime!

The best two ways you can whiten your smile with the greatest results are with either an at home kit or an in-office procedure.  Both are safe and effective.

With the at-home procedure, we take an impression of your teeth and make custom fitting whitening trays.  Once the trays are made, you take them home and once a day you can apply whitening gel into the trays and wear them for about an hour.  You would brush and floss before whitening to make sure all the food and plaque has been removed, then place the gel in the trays and wear them for about an hour.  After the time has passed, remove the trays and brush and floss again, rinsing your mouth and trays thoroughly from any remaining gel. Do this as many days as you would like, for up to 2 weeks, or till you’ve reached your desired whiteness. Then keep the trays for any future touch up use.

The in-office procedure is slightly different, in which case, we do all the work and you just sit back and enjoy the ride.  You will spend about 2 hours with us in the office, doing a series of 3 whitening treatments in one sitting.  While protecting the tissues, we are able to apply whitening gel and achieve greatest results in such a short time. So, if you don’t have the patience to do the at home treatment, this procedure is right for you!
If you’ve been with our practice for a while, you know that this time every year we participate in a fundraising opportunity that starts in March and runs through the end of June, called Smiles for Hope.  During these few short months, our office donates all the proceeds that we earn from any whitening product and procedure to a charity called Hope Arising.  We join teams in an effort to raise money to help those in Dara, Ethiopia.  Twice a year our doctors, and several others, take supplies and their abilities, to travel to Ethiopia and spend a week giving service to help fulfill dental and medical needs in their town.

So, if you’re looking to get your sweetheart or loved one a treat for their birthday, anniversary, Valentine’s Day, or any other occasion, here is a great opportunity to help them AND help someone else.  Oh, and did I mention, it’s 100% tax deductible?  That’s right!  It’s considered a charitable contribution since 100% of the proceeds go to charity!  Don’t hesitate to ask any of our friendly team questions about how you can participate in Smiles for Hope this year!

Both at home and in-office whitening $250
In-office Whitening $200
At home Whitening $150
Sources: 

Why Do We Need to Brush and Floss?

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Andra Mahoney, BS RDH

Why Do We Need to Brush and Floss?

Many of you know two questions that your Dental Hygienist will inevitably asked you when you go in for your regular check-up visit:  “Are you brushing two times a day?” and “How is your flossing going?”

As an Hygienist, we do not asked these questions to get after you.  We promise we do not love nagging you to floss.  We do it because we genuinely care for your health and helping our patients understand how brushing and flossing can keep you healthy is one of our professional goals.

Most of you know the guidelines. For optimum dental health, you should brushing two times a day for two minutes, and floss one time a day.  We know that is what we are supposed to do.  But do we know why?

Plaque (that soft, filmy, white stuff that grows on our teeth) accumulates constantly.  24/7.  It never stops growing.  Even if you do not eat food, it grows (common misconception that plaque only grows when you eat).  Inside plaque lives bacteria.  This is the bacteria that causes cavities and gum disease.  It is recommended that we brush two times a day to remove the plaque and disrupt the bacteria’s harm on our mouth.  If we do not remove the plaque, then we are allowing the bacteria to start creating cavities and cause inflammation and infection in our gums.

If the plaque is left in an area for a while then it will harden and calcify.  This is what we can tartar build-up, or you may even hear us refer to it as calculus.  While plaque is soft and can be removed with a toothbrush and floss, tartar is like a rock cemented onto your tooth.  You can brush and floss all day long, once it’s turned into calculus, it’s not going any where.  The biggest down side of that is that it still has the bacteria inside of it.  Now it’s stuck on your tooth, not going anywhere, with all this bacteria.  Even better for gum infections and things to occur.

Don’t worry, your awesome Hygienist will save you.  We have the tools and know-how to remove that calculus and get your mouth back to health!  But, so do you!  You can brush and floss every day, remove that plaque, and prevent that calculus from even forming!

Now many of you do brush your teeth.  Which is fantastic!  We love when you do that!  However, not as many of you floss.  I’m not sure why.  It’s just as important, and doesn’t really take that long.  Here’s something to remember when you want to skip flossing tonight… You can be THE most amazing brusher in the whole world, but you will never be able to clean between your teeth with just a toothbrush.  It’s a fact.  The best technique will not maneuver those toothbrush bristle to places they cannot physically reach.  Floss is the only way to clean the remaining 35% of your tooth that the brush did not get.  Floss is a toothbrush’s best friend.  They go hand in hand.  One just as important as the other.

I hope this helped you understand a bit more why we always ask these two simple questions.  If you have any other questions, we are here for you!  Just ask!

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/f/flossing

http://kidshealth.org/en/teens/teeth.html

http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/dentalhealth/Pages/Teethcleaningguide.aspx

http://www.businessinsider.com/what-happens-if-you-dont-brush-and-floss-your-teeth-2014-2

How to Clean Your Denture/Partial Denture

LindsayW

Lindsay Olsen, RDH

How to Clean Your Denture/Partial Denture 

Rinse your dentures before brushing to remove any loose food or debris.

Use a soft bristle toothbrush and a non-abrasive cleanser to gently brush all the surfaces of the dentures so they don’t get scratched.

When brushing, clean your mouth thoroughly—including your gums, cheeks, roof of your mouth and tongue to remove any plaque. This can help reduce the risk of oral irritation and bad breath.

When you’re not wearing your dentures, put them in a safe place covered in water to keep them from warping.

Do not sleep with your dentures. Your tissues need to breath overnight. If you do not take out your dentures at night, you are at risk of developing oral fungal infections.

Occasionally, denture wearers may use adhesives. Adhesives come in many forms: creams, powders, pads/wafers, strips or liquids. If you use one of these products, read the instructions, and use them exactly as directed. Your dentist can recommend appropriate cleansers and adhesives; look for products with the ADA Seal of Acceptance. Products with the ADA Seal have been evaluated for safety and effectiveness.

Visit your dentist once every 6 months for a complimentary oral cancer screening, and to have the fit of your denture evaluated.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Invisalign

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Amanda Orvis, RDH

INVISALIGN

Invisalign is a uniquely designed orthodontic treatment developed to correct mild to severe cases of malocclusion, including crowding, protruding or crooked teeth, overbites and/or underbites. Invisalign is an affordable option for correcting most dental malocclusion problems.

WHAT MAKES INVISALIGN DIFFERENT?

You may be asking yourself, what is the difference between Invisalign and traditional braces? With Invisalign you can achieve very similar if not the same outcomes as traditional braces. The advantages of Invisalign are the comfort, flexibility, and ease of access to properly care for your teeth without having brackets, wires or rubber bands in your mouth.

Invisalign uses a series of aligners to straighten your teeth over the course of your treatment. Aligners are smooth plastic trays that you wear over your teeth. Each set of aligners is worn for a few weeks before changing to a new set.

ADVANTAGES

The great thing about Invisalign is that there are no personal sacrifices in terms of food! You do not have to give up popcorn, chips, bagels, pizza crust, pretzels, nuts, apples, carrots, or corn on the cob. Fortunately, Invisalign aligners are removable, therefore allowing you to eat and drink as well as brush and floss your teeth as you would normally do. The aligners are worn for 20-22 hours a day while they gradually move your teeth into their correct positions. The aligners should only be removed to eat as well as brush and floss your teeth.

HEALTHIER TEETH AND GUMS

Often times crowding or malocclusion issues can lead to swollen, red, bleeding gums. These are signs of periodontal disease. By properly aligning the teeth, inflammation is reduced, allowing your gum tissue to fit properly around the teeth. This provides a defense against potential periodontal problems.

Food debris and plaque build-up can lead to tooth decay. In order to maintain strong healthy teeth, simply remove your aligners and brush and floss as you would normally do. Try to avoid eating and/or drinking while your aligners are in your mouth.

THE INVISALIGN PROCESS

  • Talk to your dentist about your interest in Invisalign.
  • Your dentist will take impressions and photos and send them off to Invisalign. A customized treatment plan will be created just for you.
  • After your treatment plan is created, you will then go into your dental office for a brief viewing of a virtual presentation of your anticipated final outcomes.
  • Upon your approval of your anticipated outcomes, Invisalign then fabricates your series of aligners and sends them to your dental office.
  • Your dental office will then call you to schedule an appointment for you to come in and receive your first set of aligners.
  • Over the course of your Invisalign treatment you will change out your aligners every few weeks.
  • After the completion of all of your aligners, retainers are then made to keep your teeth in their new positions to keep that new smile looking great.

We look forward to helping you create that new smile that you have always wanted.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

http://www.invisalign.com/how-invisalign-works

http://happytoothnc.com/braces-vs-invisalign/

 

Christmas Stocking Stuffers

Sharma RDH

Sharma Mulqueen, RDH

 

Christmas Stocking Stuffers

Christmas is the topic of mostly everyone this time of year.  So many of us love to see what Santa has left for us in our stockings.  When considering stocking stuffers, we have some recommendations to assist in keeping your child’s mouth and teeth at their healthiest.

When parents start thinking of what to place in their child’s stocking, they rarely think to put items that will benefit dental health.  Most parents fill their children’s stockings with candy, nuts, socks, hair bows, lotion or Chap Stick.  The list can be endless with what is placed in stockings.  So this year, why not give them items to help with their dental home care.

A New Toothbrush

Everyone loves a new toothbrush.  For the holidays, pick one that will get your kids excited about brushing their teeth.  There are character brushes, brushes that light up and even brushes that play music while you clean your teeth!  Be sure to choose a soft-bristled brush with the appropriate sized head for smaller mouths.

A Tooth Timer

If brushing the correct amount of time is difficult for your kids, consider getting a small timer to keep in the bathroom.  Most kids brush an average of 14 seconds but in their minds it was for two minutes.  A timer will insure that your child is brushing for the approiate time.   You can even join them by brushing together to make sure the family is brushing for two minutes.

A Fun Toothpaste Flavor

So many people choose mint or bubble gum for their toothpaste flavor.  You can look online and find some fun flavors.  Try giving your kids something silly that you wouldn’t usually pick.  There’s Bacon, Pickle, Cupcake, Oreo, Vanilla and Orange.  The list keeps growing.  Amazon has some great choices.

Flavored Floss

Floss is normally pretty plain, but it doesn’t have to be.  Like toothpaste, there is bacon, cupcake or pickled-flavored floss to match.  If those flavors don’t do the trick, there are banana and cinnamon-flavored options for kids to enjoy.

Sugar-Free Chewing Gum with Xylitol

Did you know that chewing gum can actually be good for your teeth? While not a substitute for brushing, sugar-free gum can help in the production of saliva which washes away trapped food particles.  Further, gum containing xylitol has actually been proven to help reduce cavities.

Holidays are such a special time to share with your family and friend’s.  Signature Dental would like to wish you all a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

http://www.xlear.com

http://www.colgate.com

http://www.oralanswers.com

Electric Toothbrushes, Are They Worth it?

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Wendy Parker, RDH

Electric Toothbrushes, Are They Worth it?

            I was never a believer of electric toothbrushes until I graduated hygiene school and I was given one for free.  Yes, I know, but I figured that since I was given one, I would at least give it a try and see what all the fuss was about.  For years I would go between my manual toothbrush and my electric one, leaving the electric one home when I traveled.  However, now, I have realized that I don’t leave home without it!  At first, I thought I am a pretty good at brushing and don’t really need it, but found that mid-afternoon, my teeth would get the fuzzy feeling on them.  When I totally committed and threw away my manual toothbrush, I found that no longer did I get the fuzzies on my teeth!  Oh man, I was so excited!

So, the question remains…is it worth it?  YES!  And here’s the great thing about it….there is a 30 day money back guarantee from Oral-B and Sonicare that if you don’t like the product, you take it back and get your money back!  These are the top two selling brands for electric toothbrushes and they are awesome!  Both companies will tell you that their product is superior but when it comes down to it, it is a personal preference.  So next time you’re in the dental isle, take a minute and compare them side by side and see which one looks more appealing to you.  The average price is about $90-$120 dollars. (Please also asked us, when you come in to the office, we sell electric toothbrushes here for a great price!)  Yes, it seems a lot for a toothbrush, but you will be amazed (and so will we) with the change in your oral health!   So try one out and let’s keep on smiling!

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Halloween Sugar Facts

KatieM

Katie Moynihan, BS RDH

Halloween Sugar Facts

Happy Halloween! Although Halloween is a fun holiday to dress up in your favorite costume, it also comes with consuming large amounts of candy and sugar. According to the US Census Bureau, the average American eats 25 pounds of candy every year with most of that consumed during Halloween time. All that sugar hidden in a small piece of candy can add up quickly. If you or your child eats 12 treats, that is equivalent to about 30 packets of sugar. It is important to take a closer look at the nutritional facts before indulging as it is guaranteed to spook you!

Halloween Candy Comparison

  • Almond Joy, Snack Size – 80 calories, 8 g sugar
  • Butterfinger, Fun Size – 100 calories, 10 g sugar
  • Gummie Bears (Haribo) – 8 pieces, around 65 calories, 21 g sugar
  • Heath Bar, Snack Size – 76 calories, 9 g sugar
  • Hershey Kisses – Average 25 calories, 2-3 g sugar each kiss
  • Hershey’s Miniature Bars – Average 42 calories, 4 g sugar each bar
  • Jolly Rancher – a serving of three Jolly Ranchers is 70 calories, 11 g of sugar.
  • Kit Kat, Fun size – 60 calories, 6 g sugar
  • Peanut M & Ms –  Snack Sixe – 5 g of fat and 9 g of sugar.
  • Almond Joy – Fun Size – 80 calories for a mini-Almond Joy or Mounds.
  • Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup, Snack Size – 110 calories, 11 g sugar per peanut butter cup
  • Skittles, Fun Size – 60 calories, 11 g sugar
  • Smarties – 1 roll, 25 calories, 6 g sugar
  • Snickers, Fun Size – 80 calories, 4 g of fat and 8 g of sugar
  • Sour Patch Kids, Mini Bag – 50 calories, 10 g sugar
  • Starburst, Fun Size – 2 candies, 40 calories, 6 g sugar
  • Three Musketeers Minis – 64 calories, 2 g of fat and 11 g of sugar
  • Tootsie Pops & Charms Blow Pops – 60 calories, 13 g of sugar.
  • Twix Minis, 1 bar – 50 calories, 5 g sugar
  • Twizzlers (Strawberry Twists) – 2 pieces, 50 calories and 6 g sugar

We all know it is nearly impossible to avoid Halloween candy altogether; however, there are some simple ways in which you can minimize the sugar overload after trick-or-treating is over. Always be sure to brush away the treats! Whether your child eats one piece of candy or ten, it is important to brush properly to prevent tooth decay. Make a candy plan to avoid going overboard with candy consumption. Set a limit on the number of candy that can be eaten each day, or a limit on the number of houses that they can visit. A candy swap is a great way to let your child enjoy the fun of trick-or-treating without overloading on sweets. You can trade small amounts of candy for a non-sugar reward such as a toy or sticker. We hope these tips will get you on track to a happier and healthier Halloween!

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/conditions/cavities/article/how-to-prevent-cavities-from-halloween-candy-1013

http://www.childrenshospitaloakland.org/main/news/halloween-candy-calorie-and-sugar-comparison-212.aspx