Why Should I Get My Wisdom Teeth Out?

Andra M

Andra Mahoney, RDH BSDH

Why Should I Get My Wisdom Teeth Out?

Teeth are generally predictable.  We know the first permanent teeth we will get are our first molars, also known as six year molars because we get them between six and seven years old.  We know they will be bigger than all our other teeth.  We know our maxillary central incisors, our two top front teeth, will come in about seven to eight years old and  be a particular shape and size.  Wisdom teeth; however, have a mind of their own!  They come any anywhere from 16-25 years old, and sometimes don’t even stick to that time frame.  They can be big as your other molars or small as your front teeth.  They can come in properly and vertically or angled and horizontally.  I have even seen X-rays of wisdom teeth going the wrong direction!  They were headed back towards the jaw bone!  Wisdom teeth do whatever they want.

Common recommendations for getting wisdom teeth removed:

Not enough room in your mouth.

Impaction.

Partially Erupted.

Why above reasons are problems:

Many of us do not have the space in our mouths to accommodate wisdom teeth.  Not enough room in our mouths can lead to the wisdom teeth causing pain.  It can also cause problems in keeping those teeth clean.  They are often hard to reach which means plaque is allowed to grow and cause cavities, tartar, and/or gum infections.

When teeth are impacted they are not coming in the proper direction.  This could be anywhere from tilted to all the way horizontal. This can present a variety of issues.  The major problem can be damage to other teeth.  If the wisdom tooth is tilted and now running into the back of your second molars, this can cause damage, decay, and potential loss of that second molar.  Impaction can also lead to cysts or infections around those teeth.  This can lead to long term damage of your jaw bone.

When teeth are partially erupted, only part of the tooth has grown into the mouth, the other is still covered with gum tissue.  This can be very hard to keep clean.  It is a great spot for food impaction and plaque bacteria to collect.  As mentioned before, this can lead to cavities, tartar, and/or gum disease.

Why get them out if they don’t hurt:

Size of wisdom teeth can play a big factor is health and recovery.  Most dentists like to get them out after the crown is fully formed, but before the roots are complete.   This helps extraction process to go easier and quicker, as well as reduces nerve damage.  Wisdom teeth, particularly those on your bottom jaw, can grow around or next to the nerve that runs through your jaw.  When the roots of wisdom teeth are allowed to grow close to that area, that increase risk for nerve damage upon extraction.  This damage can be temporary or permanent.

Stage of jaw bone growth plays a factor.  Dentist usually recommend wisdom teeth to come out in the teen years or early twenties.  This is because your jaw bone is still growing.  Once you hit your thirties, your bone is much more solid and recovery time after extractions can be longer and more difficult.

Why wait till it hurts?  Get them out on your schedule.  Spring break, summer vacation, fall break, long weekend, these are the best times for recovery. Don’t put yourself through tooth pain, its an awful experience, and one that is avoidable!

You’ve decided to get them out! Now what?

This is a great time for a chat with your dentist.  They can help you determine the appropriate avenue for you.

Different ways to get them out can include:

Just getting numb – Your appointment will be pretty straight forward.  The wisdom teeth may already be erupted and properly aligned.  You are not very nervous about the appointment.

Nitrous and getting numb – Nitrous, or laughing gas, can be administered before the local anesthesia.  This can help some people with anxiety.  It is also good to help people relax if there is a little more work involved in getting out the wisdom teeth – they are partially erupted or completely unerupted.

IV Conscious Sedation – This is a great option for a more involved procedure or those that have very high anxiety.  A dentist trained in this method, will administer medication through an IV that allows you to relax.  You are able to respond to questions (Can you open wider? Are you doing ok? Can you turn to the left?), but you will not remember the procedure.

Oral Surgeon Specialists – In some cases the removal of the wisdom teeth may be very complicated.  This can be due to position, age, nerve involvement, etc.  You may then be referred to a specialist to handle this situation.

Whatever way and method can be tailored to your specific needs through exam, xrays, and a visit with your dentist.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/w/wisdom-teeth

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/wisdom-teeth/should-you-have-your-wisdom-teeth-removed

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/wisdom-teeth/expert-answers/wisdom-teeth-removal/faq-20058558

What’s the Deal with Wisdom Teeth?

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Becky Larson, RDH

What’s the Deal with Wisdom Teeth?

Everyone has them, but not everybody knows what to do with them.  “Wisdom teeth” or 3rd molars can cause a number of problems in the mouth.

Wisdom teeth are believed to be evolutionary and were helpful to our distant ancestors who frequently ate rougher foods.  Wisdom teeth would erupt as replacements for worn out or missing teeth.  Nowadays modern advancements, better hygiene, and softer diets allow us to keep most of our teeth so we really don’t need wisdom teeth at all! For most people, wisdom teeth erupt in the late teen years or early 20’s, usually earlier for females.  They are the most posterior (towards the back) teeth.  Most people have 4 wisdom teeth total, but sometimes they can be congenitally missing.  Other times people may have extra (supernumerary) wisdom teeth.

Even if there is sufficient space in the mouth and the wisdom teeth are in alignment with the other teeth, they can still cause problems.  Because of their location, wisdom teeth are extremely hard to brush and floss.  If they are not kept clean, they can cause periodontal pocketing, which can lead to tooth loss in other areas of the mouth.  Unfortunately, most people don’t have enough space and when wisdom teeth erupt, they can push on the surrounding teeth.  This can cause crowding and misalignment throughout the entire mouth.  Wisdom teeth can also be impacted – meaning they are enclosed in the gum tissue or jawbone.  When this happens they can partially erupt or even try to erupt horizontally.  When teeth are only partially erupted, it allows bacteria to enter the tooth.  This can lead to infection, pain, swelling, jaw soreness, cysts, and other systemic illnesses.

X-ray showing impacted wisdom teeth:

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A dentist will usually take a panoramic x-ray to view the wisdom teeth to determine when/if they need to be extracted.  If extractions are indicated, getting them out at a younger age is preferable for recovery time.  If wisdom teeth are fully erupted and not impacted in the gums or bone, they can be extracted as easily as a regular tooth.  If they are impacted, the gums and/or bone need to be cut open in order to extract.  Wisdom teeth can be extracted with local anesthetic only, though other pain/anxiety management techniques can be used.  These include nitrous oxide, conscious sedation, and/or anti-anxiety pre-medication.

Recovering time is usually about 2 weeks.  During the recover a person may experience bleeding and facial swelling.  Pain medications and antibiotics are often prescribed as well.  Possible complications of wisdom teeth extractions include dry socket and parasthesia.  Dry socket occurs when a blood clot fails to form or falls out and is extremely painful.  A person should not drink from a straw for several days after the extractions to avoid dry socket.  During wisdom teeth extractions the nerves can sometimes become damaged or bruised.  This results in prolonged numbness or parasthesia, which can last weeks or months and can sometimes be permanent.  Parasthesia is more rare and generally the numbing sensation wears off after several hours.  Dry socket and/or parasthesia don’t always occur after wisdom teeth are extracted.

So you can see that wisdom teeth can cause many headaches (literally)!  Be wise and get your wisdom teeth extracted as soon as your dentist recommends it.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/wisdom-teeth

http://crest.com/en-us/oral-care-topics/general-oral-hygiene/never-ignore-your-wisdom-teeth-symptoms

picture from: http://www.quora.com/Do-all-humans-have-wisdom-teeth