AZ Mission of Mercy

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Andra Mahoney, BS RDH

AZ Mission of Mercy

Next month, Decemeber 11th-12th, our offices will be going down to the AZ State Fairgrounds in Phoenix and volunteer again at the 4th Annual AZ Mission of Mercy.

“Since 1994, Mission of Mercy has been providing free healthcare, free dental care, and free prescription medications to the uninsured, under-insured, and those who “fall through the cracks” of our healthcare system.

An independent nonprofit 501 (c)(3), faith-based community organization, Mission of Mercy receives no government funding. Because of this, we can provide healthcare without any pre-qualifications. None of our patients must prove their poverty or residency.

Founded in 1991 and launched in 1994 by clinical pharmacist, Gianna Talone Sullivan, Pharm D., headquartered in Pennsylvania and serving clinics in Arizona, Maryland, Pennsylvania and Texas, Mission of Mercy now has 17 clinics providing more than 25,000 free patient visits each year.”

Here are some pictures of when our offices volunteered last year:

AZ MOM Line

This was the line waiting to get in.  Thousands of people waited overnight and in the rain to receive dental care.

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Some of our great team!  From Left to Right: Dr Dastrup, Ann – Hygienist, Dr Miller, Morgan – Assistant, Darlene – Assistant, Jennifer – Assistant, and Dr Jenkins.

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Dr Jenkins and Darlene

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Dr Miller and Morgan

Dr D AZ MOM

Dr Dastrup and Jennifer, hard at work!

Anne AZ MOM

Ann, Hygienist, helping brighten smiles!

Amanda Andra AZ MOM

Amanda and Andra, Hygienists, getting ready to clean!

Amanda AZ MOM

Amanda, Hygienist, helping fight plaque and tartar build-up to make a happy mouth!

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After waiting in such a long line, it feels nice to relax and have Andra, Hygienist, clean your teeth!

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Here are the awesome statistics from last years Mission of Mercy event.  We are looking forward to going again this year!  If you are interested in volunteering for this event, everyone is welcome!  You do not have to be a medical profession, there is a job for everyone.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

Home

 

What type of Floss is right for you?

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Andra Mahoney BS RDH 

What type of floss is right for you?

Several months ago, Wendy wrote a great article on the necessity of flossing ( https://dentistrydonedifferently.com/2014/05/19/flossing-do-i-have-to/).  Now that you have accepted that flossing is an integral part of your oral health, let’s pick out the right floss for you! There are a plethora of different types of floss, so you are bound to find the one that fits your wants and needs.

Let’s first examine your basic floss: 

There are two main types of floss: String and Tape.

String is the most common type of floss, and what everyone thinks of when they think floss.

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String floss comes in nylon or polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE).  Nylon floss is the most common string floss.  It comes in all different types of flavors and thicknesses.  It even comes waxed and un-waxed. The wax is added to the floss to help fit through teeth with tight contacts.

PTFE floss is a lot like a plastic string. It is a monofilament, which means it’s not made from multiple fibers so it will not rip, shread, or tear.  PTFE floss is newer and people seem to like it because it is strong!  It also comes in many thicknesses and flavors, though it is not waxed because it is made to glide between teeth.  Because of its strength, I recommend not snapping the floss between your teeth.  It can very easily hurt the gum tissue if it is pulled too hard.

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Dental Tape is becoming more and more common nowadays. It is very similar to, but wider than, string floss.  Many people with sensitive gums like tape floss because they find it more comfortable when flossing below the gum line.  It is also a great “starter” floss because it is thinner than regular nylon floss.

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Advanced Types of Floss:

Spongy or Super Floss is ideal for cleaning braces, bridges, and wide gaps between teeth. Super Floss has three unique components—a stiffened-end dental floss threader, spongy floss, and regular floss—all work together for maximum benefits. It allows you to floss under appliances, cleans around appliances, between wide spaces, and removes plaque under the gumline.

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Floss Threaders come in two different types.  One looks like a large, thin, sewing needle. The plus side of this type of threader is that you can thread any type of floss and pull it through. It makes it easy to use whatever floss you have lying around the house. The down side is you have to thread the floss each time you use it.

floss threaders

CAN Eez Thru Floss Threaders Demo

A little bit easier is the floss threader that is kind of like a shoe string. It has a built in threader tip attached to the floss, so there is one less step than the other floss threader. Both threaders are great for any appliance: bridges, braces, lingual bars, etc.

Oral-BGlidePro-HealthThreaderFloss

Other Options:

Floss Picks are great for flossing hard to reach spaces or when you’re on the go. You don’t have to be in a bathroom to floss! A few tips to remember, never reuse a floss pick. The plaque bacteria that is removed by the flosser isn’t always seen. You do not want that bacteria to be reintroduced into your mouth. Which brings us to tip two, use four flossers in one flossing session. One for the upper right, upper left, lower left, and lower right (each side is measured from the last molar to the midline between your front teeth). When using standard floss, you use about 18 inches. A flosser has about one inch of floss. You do not want to transfer the bacteria from one side of the mouth to the other. So after you have used one, toss it, and grab another. Flossers are very inexpensive and come in multipacks.

Floss pic

Powered Flossers are very useful for older people who find it hard to manipulate string floss into their mouth. A disposable tip is placed on the end of the powered flosser and when the button is depressed, the floss gently vibrates back and forth. Just place it between your teeth and floss away! As with the floss picks, please do not reuse the disposable ends of the flosser.

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Interproximal brushes are helpful to those who have wider spaces between their teeth. Two options are soft picks, which are like rubber toothpicks.

Free-Soft-Picks

And the other interdental brushes are like small pipe cleaners.

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 The difference between the two comes down to preference and how wide the space is between your teeth. Both options come in various sizes. These are also one time use items that come in a pack.

Extra Helpers:

Rubber Tip Simulators are not a type of floss, but they are handy in plaque removal. They are mainly used for cleaning under operculums. An operculum is a small flap of gum tissue. It is usually found in the back of the mouth by the last tooth. It can occur naturally or come about from a tooth that has not fully erupted into the mouth.

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 As seen in the picture, the right side is a normal tooth, and the left has an operculum. Plaque can get under this flap of tissue so it will need to be cleaned. Just take the rubber tip stimulated and swipe gently under the tissue.

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WaterPiks work wonderfully in addition to your floss!  Please remember, do not substitute waterpicks for brushing and flossing. Unlike flossing, waterpicks do not remove plaque. They are effective for people who have orthodontic braces, which may retain food in areas a toothbrush cannot reach, people who catch food between their teeth, or people who are looking for extra help with their gums.

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Brief Overview:

Large gaps between your teeth? Try dental tape or Super Floss.

Not much space between your teeth? You may find that a waxed floss is easier to slide into those tight spaces.

Want less mess? Look for disposable flossers or floss in pre-measured strands.

Braces or bridges? A spongy floss is a good option, but any floss can be used if you have a floss threader.

As you can see there are a lot of options out there! But do not fear! A study from the University of Buffalo stated, “Believe it or not, researchers have compared different types of dental floss to determine whether some are more effective than others to clean teeth. The bottom line is that they are not. Any type of floss will help promote clean teeth by removing food particles and bacteria.”

Just remember that when it comes to dental floss, flossing every day is the most important choice you and your family can make.

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(microscopic image of used dental floss)

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

 

Sources:
http://www.oralb.com/topics/all-floss-types-work-well-when-used-daily.aspx

http://www.oralb.com/topics/choosing-the-best-dental-floss-for-you.aspx

http://www.deltadentalins.com/oral_health/flossing3.html

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/thomas-p-connelly-dds/dental-floss_b_1643933.html

April is Oral Cancer Awareness Month

Sharma RDH

Sharma Mulqueen RDH

April is Oral Cancer Awareness Month

OC Awareness

Early detection is key with oral cancer. When found early, oral cancer patients can have an 80 to 90% survival rate. Unfortunately 40% of those diagnosed with oral cancer will die within five years because the majority of these cases will be discovered as a late stage malignancy.

Oral cancer is particularly dangerous, because the patient may not notice it in its early stages. It can frequently prosper without producing pain or symptoms. As a result, Oral Cancer often goes undetected until it has already metastasized to another location.

Who does oral cancer screenings?

Most oral cancer screenings are done by a Dentist or Hygienist. It is very important at all of your dental appointments you have a screening completed.

When should I have my first oral cancer screening?

More people are being diagnosed with oral cancer than ever before. But surprisingly, research shows this increase is not due to the traditional risk factors of drinking, smoking and using chewing tobacco. Rather oral cancer is now being found in a younger population of men and women because due to their exposure to the HPV (Human Papillomavirus). That is why the Center for Disease Control recommends that all patients over the age of 17 be screened annually for oral cancer.

What types of screenings are there?

A routine “recall” exam usually includes a visual search for lesions and abnormal structures in the oral cavity with palpitations on neck, throat, tongue and cheeks.

The Identafi system uses the Identafi Multi-Spectral Fluorescence and Reflectance technology to enhance visualization of mucosal abnormalities such as oral cancer or premalignant dysplasia that may not be apparent to the naked eye. Unlike other fluorescence technologies and dye systems, the Identafi is Multi-Spectral with three distinct color wavelengths, making it easier to distinguish lesion morphology and vasculature.

Identafi System

The VELscope® Vx system is an adjunctive device which means it must be used together with and as a supplement to the traditional intra and extra oral head and neck exam. Unlike other adjunctive devices used for oral examinations, the VELscope® Vx does not require any dyes or prolonged testing procedures. In fact, a VELscope® Vx exam can be performed during a routine hygiene exam in about two minutes at your dental office.

Dentists, Hygienists, Periodontists, Oral Surgeons, Primary Care Physicians and Otolaryngologists now have the technology to detect morphological and biochemical changes which may lead to oral cancer and potentially save lives, thanks to the Identafi® and VELscope® Vx systems.

Where do I go if there is any concern with my screening?

You will be referred to an Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons where they will check for lesions and abnormal tissue structures and perform a biopsy.

Oral Surgeons are not front-line detectors, because their patients are typically referred by dentist and other medical professionals as a primary source for cancer diagnosis and treatment.

OC Happens

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Source:

http://www.identafi.net/tools

http://www.dentalez.com/products/stardental/identafi/

http://www.velscope.com/velscope-technology/overview/

What Is Calculus Exactly?

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Wendy Parker RDH

 

Ever heard your hygienist use the words, “build up” or “calculus” while they were cleaning your teeth? Ever wondered what that was, exactly, or what they were talking about?

Growing up, most of us heard about plaque and the importance of removing it daily, but nowadays we hear about bioflim and calculus.  What is this all about? Well, my friends, read on and you’ll find out.

In the dental world, dental plaque has been changed to the term “Biofilm.”It is a more accurate term than plaque. It is more than just the soft fuzzy stuff on your teeth.  Biofilm is everywhere in our surroundings and can form on just about anything. Ranging from clogged drains, to slippery coated rocks, and in your mouth. Biofilm is bacteria’s home. Millions of bacteria stick together in biofilm which adheres to surfaces in moist environments. Biofilms excrete a slimy glue-like substance that sticks to all kinds of materials, including your teeth! Dental plaque IS the yellowish biofilm that builds up on teeth and is composed of a complex baterial community that causes gingivitis, in the mild form, cavities, and periodontal disease, in the more advanced cases.

 staphylococcus_aureus_biofilm_01_cmyk

Typically, you can remove this biofilm, a.k.a. plaque, with your fingernail in the early stages where it still feels like the soft fuzz-like feeling on your teeth.

However, within 48 hours, if undisturbed, it begins to harden and causes gingivitis (inflammation of the gum tissues).

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     If still undisturbed, about 10 days later, it becomes calculus (a.k.a. tartar), which is difficult to remove.  But don’t worry, we know a few good hygienists that can take care of that for you!

If, by some chance, the calculus stays there for a long period of time, the bacteria that is making it’s home in your mouth, then begins to affect the surrounding tissues, causing periodontal disease (bone and gum disease).

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     So now that we KNOW what and how we get biofilm and calculus, how do we get rid of it?  The solution is something that we already know and that we have been hearing from the beginning of time.  There is no new shocking treatment, but it’s simple…you have to disrupt the bacteria from forming in your mouth and the best way to do this is to brush twice a day, floss once a day, and see your dentist/hygienist regularly.  If you wear some kind of appliance at night, like a nightguard or retainer, be sure you are brushing it and soaking it regularly.  Be sure to let us help you with any issues or needs you have to keep your smile working for you!

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Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

http://www.colgateprofessional.com/patient-education/articles/what-is-biofilm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dental_plaque

http://www.dujs.dartmouth.edu

http://www.meadfamilydental.com

www.johngoodmandds.net

www.clipartbest.com

What is a Dental Crown?

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Julie West BS RDH

A dental crown is a manufactured covering that fits over a prepared tooth to protect it from decay or fracture or to protect a tooth that has had root canal treatment. A crown may also be used to replace a tooth that is discolored or poorly shaped due to chipping or defects during formation.

crowns

Typically, the process of getting a crown involves two visits that are two weeks apart. The first visit consists of the dentist removing any decay that may be present and using a dental handpiece to shape and prepare the tooth for a crown to fit over top. An impression will then be taken of the prepared tooth structure. Your dentist or dental assistant will then make a temporary crown that will serve to protect the tooth over the next two weeks while your permanent crown is being made at a dental lab. At your second visit, the permanent crown will be tried in to ensure the color and fit are ideal. If both are satisfactory, the crown will be cemented to the prepared tooth surface.

Sensitivity after a crown is placed is common and may take several weeks to subside. Over the counter pain medication may be used to handle any discomfort. Contact your dentist if the pain persists or gets worse.

Patients should be aware that crowns, like natural teeth, may not last for life. The longevity and durability of your crown is affected by several factors including: your diet, oral homecare with brushing and flossing daily, and the type of material the crown is made out of. Please ask your dentist or dental hygienist if you have any questions.

http://www.marlboroughdental.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/CROWNS.jpg

image source: bendfamilydentist.com

 

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

 Sources:

Sports & Energy Drinks

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Wendy Parker RDH

 

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It’s that time of year again, where sports start up, we sign our little ones, our teens, and love watching sports starting with the football season. Along with that comes games and parties and lots and lots of food and drinks! Typically the drink of choice for young athletes are gatorades, powerades, and energy drinks to help with their performance in the games, however, I hope this season we think twice about our hydration drink of choice.

Some beleive that the energy drinks and gatorades are the best drink for rehydrating our bodies and giving us energy and better than a soda. However, in the recent years as we have seen an increase in soda and juice consumption by teens we have also seen an increase in tooth decay. Is there a relation? Of course!

“The big misconception is that energy drinks and sports drinks are healthier than soda for oral health” says researcher Poonam Jain, BDS, MPH, associate professor and director of community dentistry at the Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine. (http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/news/20120503/are-energy-drinks-bad-for-teeth)

A study published in the May/June 2012 issue of General Dentistry, the peer-reviewed clinical journal of the Academy of Dentistry, found that there is a significant increase in consumption of energy and sports drinks that is causing irreversible erosion of tooth enamel. (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/05/120501134319.htm)

Jain and her team tested 13 sports drinks and nine energy drinks for acidity. They tested six drinks for their effects on tooth enamel and found both types caused damage. Energy drinks, however, were twice as bad. Damaged tooth enamel cannot be fixed.

The six drinks they tested were Gatorade Rain, Powerade Option, Propel Grape, Monster Assault, Red Bull, and 5-hour energy. Samples were immersed in the drinks for 15 minutes and then the sample was transferred to actificial saliva for 2 hours and repeated 4 times a day for 5 days. This may seem a little excessive, however, some teens are drinking these bevereages or a combination of them at this amount. Their results were that the average enamel lost with sports drinks was about 1.5%, and energy drinks it was 3 %. It was interesting to me that the drink that had the highest acidity levels was Gatorade Blue!

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One that my kids love to drink! The other drinks with high acidity levels include:

  • Red Bull Sugarfree
  • Monster Assault
  • 5-hour Energy
  • Von Dutch
  • Rockstar

(http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/news/20120503/are-energy-drinks-bad-for-teeth)

I don’t know about you, but I’d do about anything to keep as much enamel as possible!

What happens is that the bacteria in the mouth take the sugars and convert them to acid and that acid eats away at the tooth enamel. The more exposure the acid has to the tooth, the more opportunity it has to wear away the enamel and cause decay. So, if you have a habit of sipping on a gatorade, energy drink, or even soda all day, the more you are exposing your teeth to acid and erosion possibly causing tooth decay.

We recommend that if you do have these drinks, please make them more of an exception than the standard (no more than 1-12 oz. bottle/day), rinse with water after you drink them, and make sure you are brush and floss at least 1 hour after consuming them. Otherwise, you could damage the softened enamel from the acidic drink. And make sure you come see us so that we can help you maintain and protect your pearly whites! We hope you all have a great season of sports, fun, friends, and good food!

 

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We look forward to helping you create that new smile that you have always wanted.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

Image Source:

www.thesportsbank.net

http://www.gatorade.com

www.clipartbest.com

What is a Root Canal?

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Andra Mahoney RDHBS

So the Doctor has told you that you need a Root Canal Treatment.  What does that mean?  Why is it necessary? And where do you go from here?

Root canal treatment is necessary when the pulp (soft tissue inside your teeth containing blood vessels, nerves and connective tissue) becomes inflamed or diseased.

anatomy-of-a-tooth

 http://culpepperdds.wordpress.com/for-patients/basic-tooth-anatomy/

 During root canal treatment, your dentist or endodontist (a dentist who specializes in treating the insides of teeth) removes the diseased pulp. The pulp chamber and root canal(s) of the tooth are then cleaned and sealed.

 

blood cell types

 http://www.dentistsonwashington.com/root-canals/

 If the infected pulp is not removed, pain and swelling can result, and your tooth may have to be removed.

Causes of an infected pulp could include:

  • A deep cavity

Deep-cavity-before

http://blog.distinctive-smiles.com/wp-content//Deep-cavity-before.jpg

  • repeated dental procedures on the same tooth
  • injury to the tooth (even if there’s not a visible crack or chip)
  • a cracked or broken tooth
    Broken Tooth 

http://www.mcardledmd.com/what-it-means-to-have-cts.html

 

If you continue to care for your teeth and gums your restored tooth could last a lifetime. However, regular checkups are necessary; a tooth without its nerve can still develop cavities or gum disease. Most of the time, a root canal is a relatively simple procedure with little or no discomfort involving one to three visits. Best of all, it can save your tooth and your smile.

perfect-smile

 http://faceandjawsurgeryblog.com/wp-content/uploads/perfect-smile.jpg

 

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

 

References:
  http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/r/root-canals

Radiographs

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Becky Larson RDH

Why do I need “x-rays” today?

Many patients are concerned about radiograph frequencies, fearing they are receiving too much radiation. While too much radiation is not good, I want to clarify what is too much and share some important facts about the purpose and benefits of radiographs.

Why do we need to take radiographs?

Radiographs can help dental professionals evaluate and diagnose many oral diseases and conditions. Radiographs can be used to evaluate cavities, bone levels, calculus deposits, abscesses, root apices, wisdom teeth, cysts, sinuses, growths, foreign objects, jaw joints, and/or jaw fractures. Much of what goes on in the mouth is not viewable without a radiograph. In most cases, treating patients without radiographs would be performing below the standard of care. Exceptions can be made in certain circumstances regarding pregnancy or patients who have undergone extensive radiation treatment for other reasons.

How often should radiographs be taken?

Radiograph frequencies are recommended by the American Dental Association. A “full set” of radiographs is generally 18-20 images, depending on the office. A full set is usually taken at a patient’s initial visit to the office and then every 3-5 years after. Panoramic radiographs are helpful in assessing when/if wisdom teeth need to be removed and in viewing eruption of permanent teeth in children. In these cases the dentist uses his/her clinical judgment to determine if a panoramic radiograph is necessary. “Check-up” radiographs usually consist of bitewings and anterior peri-apical radiographs. Frequency of these radiographs will vary from patient to patient but can be prescribed anywhere between 6 months and 36 months. Radiograph frequency is prescribed by the dentist based on a patient’s risk of caries or history of caries.

Xray_Dental_Panoramic_7

www.dxis.com

Am I getting too much radiation?

On average, Americans receive a radiation dose of about 0.62 rem (620 millirem) each year. We live in a radioactive world. Radiation is part of the environment and some types can’t be avoided. These include the air around us, cosmic rays, and the Earth itself. About half of our radiation dose comes from these sources. The other half of our yearly dose comes from man-made radiation sources that can include medical, commercial, and industrial sources. Medical radiographic imaging causes more radiation than dental radiographs. One dental intraoral radiograph has a radiation dose of about 0.005 rem. Similarly, a full set of radiographs at a dental office has the same amount of radiation as flying roundtrip from L.A. to New York. In this day and age many dental offices are using digital equipment to process radiographs. Digital imaging emits even less radiation (as much as 80% less) while still producing diagnostic images.

X-ray

dexis.web12.hubspot.com

q=dental+radiograph&FORM=HDRSC2#view=detail&id=12D6193083883C0660B641C29F834FF5CDFB89CC&selectedIndex=27

Radiation Safety

As dental professionals we are aware that patient’s are exposed to radiation. We take proper precautions and cover the neck, thyroid, and chest with a lead apron. We also make sure our radiology equipment has regular checks to ensure it is functioning properly. Radiographs are prescribed with the patient’s best interest at heart.

 

We look forward to helping you create that new smile that you have always wanted.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

 

Sources:

http://www.ada.org/~/media/ADA/Member%20Center/FIles/Dental_Radiographic_Examinations_2012.ashx

http://www.dentistry.com/treatments/dental-exam/dental-xrays-and-digital-technology

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/dental-x-rays

http://www.nrc.gov/about-nrc/radiation/around-us/doses-daily-lives.html

http://www.livescience.com/10266-radiation-exposure-cross-country-flight.html

http://www.radiologyinfo.org/en/safety/?pg=sfty_xray

Oil Pulling

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 Lora Cook RDH

 

WHAT IS OIL PULLING?

Oil pulling is a folk remedy that has recently been growing in popularity, mostly due to social media.  This is an ancient Indian practice, an ancient Ayurvedic ritual.  The origins come from Indian  medicine.  Most recently Dr F. Karach, MD. introduced it to the modern world in 1992.  This practice is promoted as a supplement to regular daily hygiene practice along with brushing and flossing. It involves swishing with a tablespoon of oil.

 

HOW IS OIL PULLING PRACTICED? 

Take a tablespoon of a plant based cold pressed organic oil and swish for twenty minutes, then spit.  Some oils that are recommended are sesame, coconut, sunflower, or olive oil.  The oil will then mix with the saliva and the claims are the oil works to pull out toxins and kill certain types of bacteria.  Depending on which website that you read, oil pulling claims to have a long list of positive results.

 

THE ORAL BENEFITS THAT HAVE BEEN CLAIMED.

Reducing plaque

Reduction in the overall oral bacterial load

Reduces inflammation in the gum tissue

Whitens teeth

Fresher breath

oil-pulling-1

 

OTHER BENEFITS

Migraine headache relief

Correcting hormone imbalances

Reducing inflammation of arthritis

May help with gastroenteritis

Aids in reduction of eczema

May reduce symptoms of bronchitis

Helps support normal kidney function

May help reduce sinus congestion

Reduced hangover after alcohol consumption

Reduces he symptoms of allergies

Helps detoxify the body of harmful metals and organisms

 

The big question is… Do any of these claims have any validity?  There is little formal trial data published about the practice of oil pulling.  The ADA states that insufficient research has been done.  The Canadian Dental Association states, “oil pullling won’t do any harm, however not convinced there are any benefits.”

 

We look forward to helping you create that new smile that you have always wanted.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

 

 

 

Source: 

http://jillee_uploads.s3.amazonaws.com/2013/07/oil-pulling

http://authoritynutrition.com/oil-pulling-coconut-oil/

http://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/oil-pulling-your-leg/

http://authoritynutrition.com/oil-pulling-coconut-oil/

How to help with braces cuts or sores?

Kara

 

Kara Johansen BSRDH

If you have ever had braces you know that there are many annoying side effects of working towards a beautiful, healthy, straight smile. Often orthodontic problems that can be taken care of at home before you can make it to your orthodontist office. Here is a list of tips to help the fellow brace face 🙂

Newly tightened braces-

Each time you get your braces tightened it means one step closer to removing them. However, it does make your teeth ache. They can be sore for 3-5 days. One study stated that 91% of adolescents had tooth discomfort during the process of having braces. (1)

  • Before you go into have your teeth adjusted it has been suggested to take an ibuprofen. Remember to only take the medication as directed on the bottle. Take the ibuprofen with milk or food to avoid a stomach ache.
  • After the appointment stick with soft foods like soup or smoothies. Some have said that cool foods feel good on newly tightened teeth.
  • One study stated that chewing sugar free gum after the procedure can cause relief. Aspergum, which is a gum with a little bit of aspirin had a good response in pain reduction. (2)

Sores from braces

A common side effect of braces are cuts in the cheek or canker sores.

  • A warm salt water rinse works wonders. Put a teaspoon of salt into a warm glass of water then swish and spit.
  • Over the counter anesthetic gels have shown to give relief. Orabase or Oragel can help.
  • A tea bag can be placed over the sore to help with sensitivity and inflammation.

Wire pocking lips and gums-

Sometimes when you are eating or brushing a twisted wire can be moved out of place. Remember that lots of times this situation can be avoided with eating the proper foods recommended by your orthodontist. There are a couple of solutions for this predicament.

  • Flexible wires can slip out of the bracket slots on the back teeth. A sterile tweezer can be used to slip the wire into the tube and back into place.
  • You can use the end of a pencil eraser to push the out of place wire behind the arch wire to make it more comfortable. Only do this on softer wires.
  • Dental wax can also be used to be placed around the wire to protect your tissues until you can see your orthodontist to get it fixed.


orthowax

http://us-professional.gumbrand.com/gumr-orthodontic-wax-mint-with-vitamin-e-and-aloe.html

relief-wax-colored

http://www.dental-wax.com/

Loose bracket or band-

If a bracket or band becomes loose you can place wax over the area to hold it into place. If it falls off, save it for when you go back to your orthodontist.

Swollen or puffy gums-

Proper oral hygiene is very important when you have braces. Improper oral hygiene can cause weakening of the enamel (white/dark brown spots), permanent inflamed gums, bleeding gums, halitosis, and cavities.

  • Brush and floss after every meal. Most important is to brush and floss before you go to bed.
  • If you have swollen gums call your general dentist to get a cleaning. It is a good idea to have cleanings every 3 months when you have braces instead of every 6 months. Have your arch wire taken out before your cleanings.
  • Super Floss, floss threaders, interproximal brushes, and Platypus flossers are very helpful.
  • Electronic toothbrushes are a better choice for cleaning your teeth and braces then a manual tooth brush. Water picks are also helpful to remove food debris.

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www.oralb.com www.gumbrand.com www.PlatypusCo.com

 

Sources:

1. Attitudes and perceptions of adults towards orthodontic treatment in an Asian community. Lew KK Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1993 Feb; 21(1):31-5. [PubMed] [Ref list]

2. Proffit W R. Contemporary orthodontics. 3rd edn. St Louis: The CV Mosby Company; 2000. [Ref list]

3. http://www.orthocenters.org/emergency.php