Keeping That Holiday Smile

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Cortney Davis, RDH

Keeping That Holiday Smile

There is a lot to be excited about and look forward to during the holidays; time with family, friends, giving and receiving presents, world peace (hopefully), service, and food. In my opinion food is the main ingredient in the recipe for a great Christmas. This time of year we are surrounded by delicious food. From holiday ham to endless desserts and treats, there are so many kinds of foods and drinks we consume while merrymaking with friends and family and soaking up as much “holiday spirit” as possible. So, eating and drinking your way through December is the norm. With all this yummy food around there is always one thing I remember to do, take care of my mouth. Yes, I admit a lot of yummy goodness goes into my overly-enthusiastic stomach, but that “gateway” needs some extra maintenance this time of year.  So here are a few tips to help keep your mouth healthy for the holidays.

My first tip is to enjoy sweets in moderation. During the holiday’s sweets are serious temptations. Holiday cookies or hot chocolate may be fun to eat and drink, but can certainly wreak havoc on your teeth. Rather than preventing yourself from eating all those treats altogether, consider saving them for special parties or occasions. By controlling your consumption of these sugary foods, you can minimize the damage to your teeth.

Another effective tip that I recommend is to reduce the possibility of staining one’s teeth. Red is a festive color, and it can also cause teeth stains. There are many different foods and drinks consumed during Christmas that can stain your teeth, such as cranberries, desserts, beets, red punch, or wine. After I consume food or drink that has the potential to stain my teeth, I like to slip into the bathroom and rinse with a small amount of water to ensure I don’t end up with heavy staining on my teeth.

The third tip, which is hard for me to follow is to remember to brush and floss after a big meal. This is very hard for many (myself included) because I tend to find myself sitting down and falling into a food-induced coma.  I have been known to have eaten holiday ham followed by apple cider and pie then finished it off with a pound of left over mash potatoes and after slip into a deep, restful nap on the couch. Then, I remember waking up to the feeling of gross, fuzzy plaque on my teeth, which didn’t feel so great. Leaving food on your teeth for too long can contribute to gum disease and tooth decay. So remember, even if it’s flossing that extra roll out from in between your teeth just try and get as much of the food out of your teeth without waiting too long.

My final tip is to not delay dental treatment or emergencies during the holidays. Yes, we get very busy during the holidays, between cooking, shopping, going to family functions, or enjoying the holiday season it is easy to put off treatment you may need. It’s also easy to say to yourself that you will do it after the holidays. But, prolonging treatment or being late on a dental appointment could make things worse. Delaying dental treatment can cause more serious problems, and if you suspect something is wrong or have been diagnosed with something needed to be treated, it is best to get it done before it gets worse. Luckily for our patients, we still have nights and weekend appointments available during the holidays!!

I hope you enjoyed these helpful tips. I also hope everyone has a great holiday and enjoy your time with your loved ones.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

http://www.deltadentalin.com/medialibraries/global/documents/grinmagazine-holiday13.pdf

http://www.dewda.com/blog/infographic-how-to-keep-your-smile-merry-and-bright-during-the-holiday-season.html

Oral Cancer Awareness

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Becky Larson, RDH

Oral Cancer Awareness

It’s April again!  Which means Oral Cancer Awareness month.  I can’t even begin to tell you how critical it is to receive regular oral cancer screenings.  Your dentist and/or dental hygienist should perform a basic screening at your six month check-ups.  We also recommend having a more in depth oral cancer screening (such as the Velscope, Oral ID, or Identafi) annually.  These more in depth screenings use florescent or ultra violet lights that can detect signs of oral cancer much earlier.  The earlier cancer is caught, the sooner treatment can begin and the better the prognosis.

Oral cancer is any abnormal growth of cells in the oral cavity (mouth).  Abnormal cell growth can be benign (no cause for concern) or malignant (can be life-threatening).  The oral cavity consists of the lips, cheek lining, salivary glands, hard and soft palates, uvula, tongue, floor of the mouth (underneath the tongue), gums, and tonsils.  The tongue and the floor of the mouth are the most common areas for oral cancer to occur.  However, the cancer can spread to other areas of the oral cavity and/or other areas of the body.

Oral cancer can manifest itself in many ways including swellings, lumps or bumps, numbness, abnormal bleeding, white patches, red patches, speckled patch, sores that do not heal, sore throat, pain when chewing/speaking/etc., changes in voice, ear pain, and dramatic weight loss.  If you are experiencing any of these symptoms please visit your dentist or primary care physician.

Risk factors for oral cancer include tobacco use, alcohol use, sun exposure, having HPV (Human papillomavirus), and a history of having oral cancer previously.  Tobacco use is the reason for most oral cancers, especially in those individuals who have used tobacco for lengthy amounts of time.  The risk increases when tobacco users become heavy alcohol drinkers.  Three out of every four oral cancers occur in people who use alcohol, tobacco, or both.  The Human papillomavirus is mainly linked to oropharyngeal cancers.  Limiting sun exposure and the use of sun screen and lip balm can help reduce the risk.  Men are twice as likely to develop oral cancer than women.  It is also important to note that more than 25% of oral cancers are found in individuals with no risk factors.

Everyone is at risk!  Make sure to visit your dentist and dental hygienist for regular oral cancer screenings.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

http://www.medicinenet.com/oral_cancer/article.htm

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/oral-cancer

http://www.cdc.gov/std/hpv/STDFact-HPVandOropharyngealCancer.htm

 

Dental Fears

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Becky Larson RDH

I once had an elementary school teacher who would scream if she heard the word “dentist.” About 75% of the population has some form of dental anxiety while about 5-10% of the population has an actual dental phobia. There are various degrees of dental anxiety/phobia, some even requiring psychiatric help. Those who experience this fear of going to the dentist will often avoid dental appointments until they are in extreme pain. I think we all realize that sometimes going to the dentist is just not fun. However, some signs that you may suffer from legitimate dental anxiety/phobia include trouble sleeping the night before a dental appointment, nervous feelings that increase in the dental office waiting room, crying or feeling physically sick when thinking about the dentist, and/or panic attacks or difficulty breathing when at or thinking of the dentist.

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So what causes dental anxiety or dental phobia? Some common reasons for experiencing dental anxiety are fear of pain, fear of injections, fear that injections won’t work, fear of anesthetic side effects, fear of not being in control, embarrassment, and loss of personal space. The key to dealing with any of these fears is to talk to your dentist. If your dentist is aware of your fear(s) he/she can suggest ways to make you feel more comfortable when in the dental chair. Some helpful strategies include:

  • Having your dentist explain procedures in detail prior to and during treatment
  • Topical anesthetic and/or closing your eyes during injections
  • Establish a “stop” signal when you want your dentist to stop or give you a break
  • Nitrous oxide prior to treatment
  • Prescription pre-medication (such as Halcion)
  • Sedation/general anesthesia

At our offices we do offer intravenous sedation techniques for dental treatment. With these techniques, sedation drugs are administered through an IV in the patient’s arm or hand. While the patient is sedated, they will still be still be conscious and able to respond to dental staff. They will also be able to breathe on their own.

Recognizing dental fears and finding ways to cope with them is extremely important to your dental health. Regular check-ups and cleanings can help prevent recurrent decay, which in turn can reduce the amount of time and money you spend at the dentist.

 

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

 

Sources:

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/easing-dental-fear-adults

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dental_phobia

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/Oral-and-Dental-Health-Basics/Checkups-and-Dental-Procedures/The-Dental-Visit/article/What-is-Dental-Anxiety-and-Phobia.cvsp

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=dnetal+anxiety&FORM=HDRSC2

Hydrogen Peroxide

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Lora Cook RDH

 Is Using Hydrogen Peroxide as a Mouth Rinse Safe?

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Many commercial mouth washes and whitening strips have hydrogen peroxide as one of the key active ingredients. However many are using straight hydrogen peroxide as a mouth wash to kill germs. Is this a safe and effect practice?

Hydrogen peroxide is compose of water and oxygen that works to kills germs and bacteria, and helps to whiten teeth.  It comes in either 1% or 3% concentrations. You can even see it in action!  When it foams in your mouth you know that it is working at killing bacteria.  It also can be used to clean your night guard, retainers, or even soak your tooth brush in.  Best of all it is inexpensive. 

 However this is not the magic cure all, there are some strong precautions that I would like to share with you.  While there are many benefits it can be harmful on gum tissue if used in too strong a solution or too long.  It is very drying to the tissues. This will also work to kill good bacteria in the mouth.  This will leave opportunity for yeast infections of the mouth to flourish, also called thrush.  Candidiasis is a fungal or yeast infection of the mouth or throat. Candida yeast that normally live in the mucosa membrane will flourish causing a over growth of candida, commonly called yeast infections. 

This can be a relatively safe practice by following a few guidelines; dilute peroxide with 50% water, and do use every day.  If you are one of the many people who suffer from dry mouth stick with a over the counter rinse formulated for dry mouth sufferers. 

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.using-hydrogen-peroxide.com/hydrogen-peroxide-as-mouthwash.html

http://copublications.greenfacts.org/en/tooth-whiteners/l-3/6-tooth-whitening-side-effects.htm

http://www.healthline.com/health/thrush#Symptoms4

What is a Dental Implant?

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Amanda Orvis RDH

A dental implant is a titanium post used to replace missing teeth and support dental prosthetics. Implants are surgically guided into the jaw bone and integrate with the bone to support a dental prosthesis such as a crown, bridge and/or denture.

Success or failure of dental implants can depend on a few factors. Smoking is one of the number one causes of implant failure. Smoking can slow down the healing as well as act as an irritant to the tissue and bone surrounding the implant. Certain prescription medications can affect the integration of the implant with the surrounding bone as well. Stress to the implant due to clenching and/or grinding, also known as bruxing, can also be a significant factor on the success or failure of the implants. All of these potential issues will be discussed during your implant evaluation appointment.

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Individual tooth replacement

For an individual tooth, an implant is selected and placed into the site of the missing tooth. The implant is given 3-6 months time to heal and integrate into the surrounding bone so that it becomes permanently stable. Once the implant has integrated with the surrounding bone the implant is ready to be restored. An impression is taken to allow a custom crown to be fabricated. Once the crown is fabricated, an implant abutment is placed into the implant and secured by a screw. The crown is then cemented in place on top of the implant abutment.

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Implant supported bridge

An implant supported bridge is a group of teeth supported by two or more dental implants. The process of placing an implant supported bridge is very similar to the individual implant placement discussed above. To begin, implants are selected and placed into the sites of two or more missing teeth. The implants are given time to heal and to integrate with the surrounding bone. Once the implants have integrated with the surrounding bone the implants are ready to be restored. An impression is taken to allow a custom bridge to be fabricated. Implant abutments are placed into the implants and then secured with screws. The implant abutments will act as anchors to support the floating teeth between the implants known as pontics. The bridge is then cemented in place on top of the implant abutments.

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Implant Supported Denture

Implant supported dentures can be made to be removable or permanently fixed into the mouth. Removable implant supported dentures can be disconnected from the implant abutments with finger pressure by the wearer. To enable this, the abutment is shaped as a small connector, which can be connected to an adapter on the underside of the denture. A permanently fixed implant supported denture is secured in place by your dentist with screws. Even though dentures are placed, it is still import to note that you must visit with your dentist at least once a year to have your tissue and implants examined.

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Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

 

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=dental+implants&rlz=1T4GGNI_enUS478US479&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=rdJqVJ6MK8XNiAKv9YCQCQ&ved=0CAgQ_AUoAQ&biw=2133&bih=952&dpr=0.75#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=eMm4N-kgaUlBlM%253A%3B3WWM7H1IqnqHuM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.elkgrovesmilecenter.com%252Fthedentalsitecontent%252F887%252FImage%252Fdental-implants-scenarios.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.elkgrovesmilecenter.com%252FServices%252FElk-Grove-Village-Dental-Implants%252F2390%3B700%3B190

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https://www.google.com/search?q=implant+supported+bridge&rlz=1T4ADRA_enUS397US398&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=p4tjVM-nPI-sogTz8ILQCw&ved=0CAgQ_AUoAQ&biw=1440&bih=708%20-%20facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=ky4WogzaSbnB7M%253A%3BzRnYA9mCT4yCFM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.longislandperio.com%252Ffiles%252F2012%252F01%252F3-unit-implant-bridge_ti-abutments_tcm261-41493.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.longislandperio.com%252Fdental-implants%252#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=BaJFRVOs6xP5WM%253A%3BWRT69acQ4lnnqM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.foralifetimeofsmiles.com%252Fwp-content%252Fuploads%252F2013%252F07%252Fimplant-supported-bridge.gif%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.foralifetimeofsmiles.com%252Foral-surgery%252F%3B400%3B164

https://www.google.com/search?q=types+of+implant+supported+denture&rlz=1T4ADRA_enUS397US398&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=JY1jVJDkCNLSoATo-YDQBg&ved=0CAgQ_AUoAQ&biw=1440&bih=708%20-%20facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=o0SUhE97Ov1DRM%253A%3B9ZakGA12S_8WBM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Floulyprostheticdentistry.com%252Fuploads%252F3%252F2%252F4%252F8%252F3248400%252F6261953.jpg%253F318%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.loulyprostheticdentistry.com%252Fdental-implants

What Is Laser Dentistry?

Peggy

 

Peggy Storr RDH

Just as in other areas of medicine, lasers are increasingly becoming more common in dentistry.  Lasers are instruments that produce a very narrow but intense beam of light. The light can remove or shape tissue. While lasers have been used in dentistry since 1985, its estimated that only 6% of dental offices utilize lasers. With improvements in technology and as the cost of lasers decrease, a greater number of dentists and hygienists will feel confident in incorporating lasers into their treatments.

How are lasers used in dentistry?

Hard Tissue (or Tooth) Laser Procedures

  • Cavity detection: Lasers provide readings of by-products produced by tooth decay
  • Tooth preparation for fillings- dental lasers may soon eliminate the need for anesthetic and the dental drill.
  • Tooth Sensitivity-lasers may be used to seal tubules located on the root of the tooth that are responsible for sensitive teeth.
  • Help treat infections in root canals

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Soft Tissue (or Gum) Laser Procedures

  • Reshaping of gum tissue to expose tooth structure if needed to place a filling
  • Reshaping gum tissue to improve the appearance of a gummy smile
  • Remove inflamed gum tissues and aid in the treatment of gum disease
  • Removing muscle attachments causing “tongue-tie”
  • Removing benign tumors from gums, palate, sides of cheeks and lips
  • Reducing pain and minimize healing of cold sores
  • Treat pain and inflammation of temporomandibular joint disorder

 

While lasers do not yet replace the traditional dental drill, or the instruments the dental hygienist uses to scale teeth, improvements in laser technology will soon offer quicker, more effective and more comfortable procedures than in the past. This is good news for all especially those of you are anxious at the thought of visiting the dentist!

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/laser-use-dentistry

www.rdhmag.com/articles/print/volume-21/dental-lasers

Lesley Ranft, The Future of Dental Lasers, Retrieved from  http://www.Consumer Guide to Dentistry

Lesley Ranft, Laser Dentistry: Enhancing Dental Treatment with Lasers, Retrieved from http://www.Consumer Guide to Dentistry

http://www.Know Your Teeth.com/infobites/abc/article What is Laser Dentistry? http://www.yourdentistryguide.com/laser/

www.dentistrytoday.com300

 

Stay Hydrated …and Keep Smiling

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Ann Clark RDH

     For a lot of people, summer fun means time in the sun and chilling in the pool.  While cool water might feel good on the outside, it won’t lower your core body temperature.  To do that, and avoid dehydration, you need to get enough water and other fluids inside your body.
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     Did you know that if you are thirsty or feel worn down, you are already dehydrated?  Other symptoms include light-headedness, headache, fatigue, muscle cramps, or dry mouth.  Diet beverages although thought to make you hungrier and dehydrate you, actually do hydrate you and bonus…make you less hungry says a recent clinical trial published in the June issue of “Obesity”.  Also consuming fruits and vegetables higher in water content can also aide in proper hydration (watermelon, strawberries, lettuce, tomatoes etc).  Staying hydrated can also reduce the risk of other health problems, such as heart disease, hypertension, exercise asthma and hyperglycemia.   Not only is a dry mouth uncomfortable while wearing a sport’s mouthguard, for example, but changes in your saliva’s composition can diminish it’s natural ability to buffer against decay-causing bacteria.
     So keep our summer smile happening!  Drink plenty of fluids-especially water-before, during, and after your fun in the sun!
Information from the American Beverage Association 7/24/14
Referenced-  “3 Tips to Staying Hydrated This Summer”
pic source: www.alsplumbing.com

Tooth in a Tube

Kara

Kara Johansen BS RDH

If your dentist said that there was a procedure he/she could do to prevent and reverse cavities would you do it?

Well, guess what, there is such a procedure! As a hygienist I would have appointments that were very frustrating. These patients use mouthwash, brush two times a day, floss 2 times a day, they don’t rinse out their toothpaste, they come to their 6 month appointments, have great nutritional habits, don’t smoke or drink, and don’t take medications. However, some of these fabulous patients still get cavities. Then the dentist says that he/she is going to “watch” the tooth hoping that through good oral hygiene habits it will get better. Most of the time, honestly, the “watch” areas do not resolve. Finally we found a solution. This miracle procedure is made possible by MI Paste Plus aka Tooth in a Tube.

What is MI Paste?

Mi paste

Besides good oral hygiene our body has ways of remineralizing or strengthening our teeth. In our saliva we naturally have Calcium and Phosphate. These are minerals like fluoride and can reverse small cavities. However, when we have habits that decrease saliva flow and the mouth becomes more acidic. MI Paste is a product that helps balance out the decrease in saliva and acidity of the mouth. MI Paste has Calcium and Phosphate and MI Paste Plus has fluoride.

  • MI Paste and MI Paste Plus (with fluoride) contain RECALDENT™ (CPP-ACP); Casein Phosphopeptide (CPP) are natural occurring molecules which are able to release calcium and phosphate ions and stabilize Amorphous Calcium Phosphate (ACP)
  • RECALDENT™ (CPP-ACP) is milk derived with lactose content less than 0.01%*
  • MI Paste and MI Paste Plus are water-based, sugar-free topical tooth crèmes
  • 5 Flavors melon, mint, strawberry, tutti-frutti and vanilla

(http://www.mi-paste.com/about.php)

Who benefits from MI Past Plus?

When a patient comes into our chair we access their cavity risk level. Here is the list of low risk patients.

Low Risk-

  • Fluroide exposure
  • Occasional sugary foods and drinks at meal time
  • No cavities in mother, care give/or siblings for past 24 months (for patients ages 6-14)
  • Has a dental home- patient of record, recieves regular dental care
  • No special Health care needs
  • No Chemo/Radiation Therapy
  • No Eating disorders
  • No Medications that reduce Salivary Flow
  • No drug or alcohol abuse
  • No tobacco/electronic cigarette
  • No new carious lesions
  • No missing teeth in past 36 months
  • No visible plaque
  • No unusual teeth shapes
  • No fillings between the teeth
  • No exposed root surfaces
  • No fillings with a large ledge
  • No spaces where food gets caught
  • No braces
  • No dry mouth

After a patient has been given a risk level the clinician will decide if they are eligible for MI Paste Plus. Looking at the low risk evaluation most people would say yes to one or more of the list above. If you have said yes to one of the above listed items you are at high risk for cavities. Most people would benefit from MI Paste Plus.

What can MI Paste Plus do for You?

  • reduce sensitivity
  • reduce symptoms of xerostomia (dry mouth) : medications, medical conditions, chemotherapy, decreased salivary gland function, smoking, drug use, and stress
  • it can help remineralize weak enamel
  • remove white spot lesions. Your dentist can also use MI paste Plus to remove weak enamel and white spot lesions on the teeth with a process called enamel microbrasion. Ask one of our Dentists about this procedure. imagesCAD5OMMG

How to Apply? (from the MI Paste web site)

  • Brush with a fluoride toothpaste in the morning and at night
  • Apply a pea-sized amount of MI Paste to your teeth’s surface using a cotton swab or gloved finger
  • Leave undisturbed for 3 minutes
  • Expectorate (spit) but do not rinse; leave the excess to slowly dissolveIt’s that simple!Your dentist will likely use one of the following methods to apply MI Paste/MI Paste Plus:Custom Tray Application:
  • Fill a custom tray with MI Paste
  • Place it in your mouth
  • Leave undisturbed for 3 minutes
  • Remove tray and spread remaining MI Paste over tooth surfaces with a gloved finger

Where do I purchase MI Paste?

MI paste cannot be purchased at your pharmacy or local grocery store. You can buy MI Paste Plus from your Dentist or on amazon.com.

 

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

 

Picture Sources:

www.dentaleconomics.com

www.mi-paste.com

Sports & Energy Drinks

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Wendy Parker RDH

 

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It’s that time of year again, where sports start up, we sign our little ones, our teens, and love watching sports starting with the football season. Along with that comes games and parties and lots and lots of food and drinks! Typically the drink of choice for young athletes are gatorades, powerades, and energy drinks to help with their performance in the games, however, I hope this season we think twice about our hydration drink of choice.

Some beleive that the energy drinks and gatorades are the best drink for rehydrating our bodies and giving us energy and better than a soda. However, in the recent years as we have seen an increase in soda and juice consumption by teens we have also seen an increase in tooth decay. Is there a relation? Of course!

“The big misconception is that energy drinks and sports drinks are healthier than soda for oral health” says researcher Poonam Jain, BDS, MPH, associate professor and director of community dentistry at the Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine. (http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/news/20120503/are-energy-drinks-bad-for-teeth)

A study published in the May/June 2012 issue of General Dentistry, the peer-reviewed clinical journal of the Academy of Dentistry, found that there is a significant increase in consumption of energy and sports drinks that is causing irreversible erosion of tooth enamel. (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/05/120501134319.htm)

Jain and her team tested 13 sports drinks and nine energy drinks for acidity. They tested six drinks for their effects on tooth enamel and found both types caused damage. Energy drinks, however, were twice as bad. Damaged tooth enamel cannot be fixed.

The six drinks they tested were Gatorade Rain, Powerade Option, Propel Grape, Monster Assault, Red Bull, and 5-hour energy. Samples were immersed in the drinks for 15 minutes and then the sample was transferred to actificial saliva for 2 hours and repeated 4 times a day for 5 days. This may seem a little excessive, however, some teens are drinking these bevereages or a combination of them at this amount. Their results were that the average enamel lost with sports drinks was about 1.5%, and energy drinks it was 3 %. It was interesting to me that the drink that had the highest acidity levels was Gatorade Blue!

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One that my kids love to drink! The other drinks with high acidity levels include:

  • Red Bull Sugarfree
  • Monster Assault
  • 5-hour Energy
  • Von Dutch
  • Rockstar

(http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/news/20120503/are-energy-drinks-bad-for-teeth)

I don’t know about you, but I’d do about anything to keep as much enamel as possible!

What happens is that the bacteria in the mouth take the sugars and convert them to acid and that acid eats away at the tooth enamel. The more exposure the acid has to the tooth, the more opportunity it has to wear away the enamel and cause decay. So, if you have a habit of sipping on a gatorade, energy drink, or even soda all day, the more you are exposing your teeth to acid and erosion possibly causing tooth decay.

We recommend that if you do have these drinks, please make them more of an exception than the standard (no more than 1-12 oz. bottle/day), rinse with water after you drink them, and make sure you are brush and floss at least 1 hour after consuming them. Otherwise, you could damage the softened enamel from the acidic drink. And make sure you come see us so that we can help you maintain and protect your pearly whites! We hope you all have a great season of sports, fun, friends, and good food!

 

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We look forward to helping you create that new smile that you have always wanted.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

Image Source:

www.thesportsbank.net

http://www.gatorade.com

www.clipartbest.com

What is a Root Canal?

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Andra Mahoney RDHBS

So the Doctor has told you that you need a Root Canal Treatment.  What does that mean?  Why is it necessary? And where do you go from here?

Root canal treatment is necessary when the pulp (soft tissue inside your teeth containing blood vessels, nerves and connective tissue) becomes inflamed or diseased.

anatomy-of-a-tooth

 http://culpepperdds.wordpress.com/for-patients/basic-tooth-anatomy/

 During root canal treatment, your dentist or endodontist (a dentist who specializes in treating the insides of teeth) removes the diseased pulp. The pulp chamber and root canal(s) of the tooth are then cleaned and sealed.

 

blood cell types

 http://www.dentistsonwashington.com/root-canals/

 If the infected pulp is not removed, pain and swelling can result, and your tooth may have to be removed.

Causes of an infected pulp could include:

  • A deep cavity

Deep-cavity-before

http://blog.distinctive-smiles.com/wp-content//Deep-cavity-before.jpg

  • repeated dental procedures on the same tooth
  • injury to the tooth (even if there’s not a visible crack or chip)
  • a cracked or broken tooth
    Broken Tooth 

http://www.mcardledmd.com/what-it-means-to-have-cts.html

 

If you continue to care for your teeth and gums your restored tooth could last a lifetime. However, regular checkups are necessary; a tooth without its nerve can still develop cavities or gum disease. Most of the time, a root canal is a relatively simple procedure with little or no discomfort involving one to three visits. Best of all, it can save your tooth and your smile.

perfect-smile

 http://faceandjawsurgeryblog.com/wp-content/uploads/perfect-smile.jpg

 

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

 

References:
  http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/r/root-canals