Tooth Sensitivity

KatieM

Katie Moynihan RDH

Tooth Sensitivity

Sensitive teeth is one of the most common concerns among dental patients. Tooth sensitivity occurs due to enamel loss or gum recession which exposes the underlying dentin structure of the tooth. The dentin layer of your tooth is found underneath the enamel and contains several tiny tubes which run from the nerve to the outside of the tooth. When exposed, these tubes are highly sensitive to temperature changes, sweets, or mechanical forces. Not to mention very painful!

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Tooth sensitivity can be caused by several factors. Aggressive brushing can wear away your enamel at the gumline leading to gum recession and exposed tooth root. Another cause of sensitivity can be from continuous grinding of the teeth to the point that the enamel is completely worn down to the dentin layer. Cracked teeth or worn fillings can create passageways to the nerve of the tooth. Periodontal disease, or severe gum disease, can contribute to sensitivity because the gums around the teeth break down and lead to gum loss and bone loss.

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There are several ways to help reduce tooth sensitivity either at home or at the dental office. The type of treatment will depend of what is causing the sensitivity.

At home treatments include:

  • using a soft or extra-soft toothbrush while brushing gently in order to avoid toothbrush abrasion at the gumline (take a good look at your toothbrush…if the bristles are pointing in multiple directions, you’re brushing too hard!)
  • using a toothpaste that contains potassium nitrate, which penetrates the exposed dentin and soothes the nerve endings
  • using a fluoride toothpaste to help strengthen the tooth and exposed dentin
  • using MI Paste (available at your dental office) to block dentin tubule openings
  • limit acidic foods and drinks because they can remove small amounts of enamel over time

In office treatments include:

  • application of a fluoride varnish – helps seal the tubules and rebuild exposed dentin
  • application of a fluoride foam – provides a high dose of fluoride to help strengthen teeth
  • bonding agents can be placed at the gumline if necessary to seal exposed dentin and reduce sensitivity
  • restorative treatment if needed to correct the tooth that is causing the sensitivity
  • periodontal treatment if needed to keep gums healthy around the teeth

A mix of potassium nitrate and fluoride is your best solution for desensitization. Some products which include these active ingredients include Sensodyne, Pronamel, Colgate Sensitive Pro Relief, and Colgate Prevident 5000 Sensitive. These products must be used on a regular basis for at least 30 days before any therapeutic benefit will take place. Whitening and tartar control toothpastes contain abrasive ingredients that can damage tooth enamel and may be too harsh for those with sensitive teeth. The application of a fluoride varnish is always available in-office at your request. If you suffer from tooth sensitivity, feel free to ask us which desensitizing agents will work best for you!

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Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

http://www.ada.org/~/media/ADA/Publications/Files/patient_33.ashx

https://us.sensodyne.com/faq.aspx

http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/conditions/tooth-sensitivity/article/treatment-options-for-tooth-sensitivity

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/s/sensitive-teeth

Tooth in a Tube

Kara

Kara Johansen BS RDH

If your dentist said that there was a procedure he/she could do to prevent and reverse cavities would you do it?

Well, guess what, there is such a procedure! As a hygienist I would have appointments that were very frustrating. These patients use mouthwash, brush two times a day, floss 2 times a day, they don’t rinse out their toothpaste, they come to their 6 month appointments, have great nutritional habits, don’t smoke or drink, and don’t take medications. However, some of these fabulous patients still get cavities. Then the dentist says that he/she is going to “watch” the tooth hoping that through good oral hygiene habits it will get better. Most of the time, honestly, the “watch” areas do not resolve. Finally we found a solution. This miracle procedure is made possible by MI Paste Plus aka Tooth in a Tube.

What is MI Paste?

Mi paste

Besides good oral hygiene our body has ways of remineralizing or strengthening our teeth. In our saliva we naturally have Calcium and Phosphate. These are minerals like fluoride and can reverse small cavities. However, when we have habits that decrease saliva flow and the mouth becomes more acidic. MI Paste is a product that helps balance out the decrease in saliva and acidity of the mouth. MI Paste has Calcium and Phosphate and MI Paste Plus has fluoride.

  • MI Paste and MI Paste Plus (with fluoride) contain RECALDENT™ (CPP-ACP); Casein Phosphopeptide (CPP) are natural occurring molecules which are able to release calcium and phosphate ions and stabilize Amorphous Calcium Phosphate (ACP)
  • RECALDENT™ (CPP-ACP) is milk derived with lactose content less than 0.01%*
  • MI Paste and MI Paste Plus are water-based, sugar-free topical tooth crèmes
  • 5 Flavors melon, mint, strawberry, tutti-frutti and vanilla

(http://www.mi-paste.com/about.php)

Who benefits from MI Past Plus?

When a patient comes into our chair we access their cavity risk level. Here is the list of low risk patients.

Low Risk-

  • Fluroide exposure
  • Occasional sugary foods and drinks at meal time
  • No cavities in mother, care give/or siblings for past 24 months (for patients ages 6-14)
  • Has a dental home- patient of record, recieves regular dental care
  • No special Health care needs
  • No Chemo/Radiation Therapy
  • No Eating disorders
  • No Medications that reduce Salivary Flow
  • No drug or alcohol abuse
  • No tobacco/electronic cigarette
  • No new carious lesions
  • No missing teeth in past 36 months
  • No visible plaque
  • No unusual teeth shapes
  • No fillings between the teeth
  • No exposed root surfaces
  • No fillings with a large ledge
  • No spaces where food gets caught
  • No braces
  • No dry mouth

After a patient has been given a risk level the clinician will decide if they are eligible for MI Paste Plus. Looking at the low risk evaluation most people would say yes to one or more of the list above. If you have said yes to one of the above listed items you are at high risk for cavities. Most people would benefit from MI Paste Plus.

What can MI Paste Plus do for You?

  • reduce sensitivity
  • reduce symptoms of xerostomia (dry mouth) : medications, medical conditions, chemotherapy, decreased salivary gland function, smoking, drug use, and stress
  • it can help remineralize weak enamel
  • remove white spot lesions. Your dentist can also use MI paste Plus to remove weak enamel and white spot lesions on the teeth with a process called enamel microbrasion. Ask one of our Dentists about this procedure. imagesCAD5OMMG

How to Apply? (from the MI Paste web site)

  • Brush with a fluoride toothpaste in the morning and at night
  • Apply a pea-sized amount of MI Paste to your teeth’s surface using a cotton swab or gloved finger
  • Leave undisturbed for 3 minutes
  • Expectorate (spit) but do not rinse; leave the excess to slowly dissolveIt’s that simple!Your dentist will likely use one of the following methods to apply MI Paste/MI Paste Plus:Custom Tray Application:
  • Fill a custom tray with MI Paste
  • Place it in your mouth
  • Leave undisturbed for 3 minutes
  • Remove tray and spread remaining MI Paste over tooth surfaces with a gloved finger

Where do I purchase MI Paste?

MI paste cannot be purchased at your pharmacy or local grocery store. You can buy MI Paste Plus from your Dentist or on amazon.com.

 

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

 

Picture Sources:

www.dentaleconomics.com

www.mi-paste.com

“They are just baby teeth. So what does it matter”?

Peggy

 

Peggy Storr BSRDH

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Many people think that dental care of baby (primary) teeth isn’t really necessary. They aren’t permanent teeth and they will be lost eventually. The truth is that as soon as those little teeth appear, they should be cleaned daily. A tiny smear of toothpaste should start about the age of 1, as should the first visit to the dentist. Many of the baby teeth will be in your child’s mouth until he or she is 13 years old.

Look in your child’s mouth. White spots or lesions are early signs of demineralization or decay of the teeth. These lesions can be reversed with proper homecare and administration of fluoride and or MI Paste.

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www.recaldent.com

Early-Childhood-Caries1

http://www.babyorganics.co.id/general/dental-caries-on-children/

Decay (cavities or caries) in baby teeth is a serious health concern that is now known to be contagious. Dental decay is five times more common than asthma and seven times more common than hay fever in children. While decay in permanent teeth has declined, decay in baby teeth is increasing. Left untreated, cavities can lead to dental pain that can affect a child’s eating, speaking, and learning. It can lead to expensive treatment, malnourishment, disruption of growth and development, and may even cause life threatening infections. If the dentist simply pulls the decayed tooth, it can affect how the permanent teeth grow in. The space from the baby tooth must be preserved or the permanent teeth may erupt in a crowded and incorrect position.

Most people are surprised to learn that cavities are contagious. But bacteria, particularly Mutans Streptococci, are responsible for tooth decay and bacteria can be transmitted from one person to another. If mom cleans the baby’s pacifier by putting it in her own mouth, or shares a spoon, she can transfer bacteria to the baby. Being mindful of diet is a first step in prevention of tooth decay. Dipping a pacifier in honey or sugar is a bad idea, as is letting a child go to bed with a bottle of milk, juice, or anything other than water.

Chewy, sticky foods (such as dried fruit or candy) are best if eaten as part of a meal rather than as a snack. If possible, brush the teeth or rinse the mouth with water after eating these foods. Minimize snacking, which creates a constant supply of acid in the mouth. Avoid constant sipping of sugary drinks or frequent sucking on candy and mints. The sticky sour candies kids love so much are the worst as they stay in the mouth longer and cause significant increases in the acid that cause tooth decay.

Dental sealants can prevent some cavities. Sealants are thin plastic-like coatings applied to the chewing surfaces of the molars. This coating prevents the buildup of plaque in the deep grooves on these surfaces. Sealants are often applied on the teeth of children, shortly after the molars come in.

Fluoride is also recommended to protect against dental caries. People who get fluoride in their drinking water or by taking fluoride supplements have less tooth decay. Numerous studies report that products containing Xylitol decrease tooth decay. Gum or mints for children who are beyond the choking stage are recommended. Xylitol needs to be among the first three ingredients.

Dental disease can impact the total well-being of a child and is largely preventable.  So while they are “JUST BABY TEETH”, they are a vital consideration in the health of your child.  A healthy mouth contributes to the overall health every child.

Sources:

1. Ezer, Michelle, S, DDS, Swoboda, Natalie A DDS and Farkouh, David DMD, MS; Early Childhood Caries: The Dental Disease of Infants

2. Chow AW. Infections of the oral cavity, neck, and head. In: Mandell GL, Bennett JE, Dolin R, eds. Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2009:chap 60.

3. Sleeper, Laura J, RDH, MA and Gronski Ashley; The Benefits of Xylitol; http://Dimensionsofdentalhygiene.com/June 2014

4. http://www.thedentalleif.net

5. http:// twoothtimer.com