Tips for Flossing and Maintaining Your Oral Health While in Braces

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Amanda Orvis, RDH

Tips for Flossing and Maintaining Your Oral Health While in Braces

Flossing may seem like it is almost impossible when you are in braces. It can even seem intimidating. It is a fact that it takes longer to floss your teeth if you have traditional wired braces. Thankfully there are tools that can help take some of the hassle out of flossing around braces. Please read below for some suggestions.

Floss Threaders

These threaders are a great tool to help achieve getting your floss behind your wire and between your teeth. Simply grab a normal piece of floss and one threader. Thread the floss through the loop hole in the threader, the same way you would thread a needle. After you have threaded the floss threader, simply guide the threader behind your orthodontic wire and floss between your teeth. See picture below.

 

Super Floss

Super floss is a pre-threaded flosser. It consists of three parts. Part one is the stiffened needle-like end. Part two is the spongy floss. Part three is the regular floss. This one piece threaded floss is great for maneuvering around those orthodontic wires. The great thing about super floss is that you do not have to thread the floss at all; it is already done for you! The spongy part of the floss is great for those wider spaces between your teeth that you get while your teeth are moving and shifting while you are in braces. The traditional end of the floss is great for those tighter spaces. See picture below.

 

Proxabrushes

These small brushes are great for cleaning between the teeth and behind your orthodontic wires. Proxabrushes help to remove the plaque in those hard to reach areas which are commonly missed. To use these brushes, you simply guide the brush behind the wire and move the brush up and down cleaning any remaining plaque on the teeth after brushing.

 

Waterpik

Waterpiks, also known as water flossers, are great to use around orthodontic brackets and wires. They are easy and effective. You simply point the water flosser between your teeth along the gumline and let the water spray between the teeth. Water flossers help to remove plaque and food debris in those hard to reach areas.

 

*If you would like a demonstration on any of these products please ask your dentist or dental hygienist at your next dental visit.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

http://oralb.com/en-us/products/super-floss

http://www.gumbrand.com/between-teeth-cleaning/floss-threaders/gum-eez-thru-floss-threaders-840a.html

http://www.gumbrand.com/between-teeth-cleaning/interdental-brushes/gum-go-betweens-proxabrush-cleaners-tight-872rn.html

https://www.waterpik.com/oral-health/how-to-floss/

Keeping Your Teeth For a Lifetime

KarenK

Karen Kelley RDH

Keeping Your Teeth For a Lifetime

Our dental practice has more over 50 year olds than under 50.  As aging adults, we need to be aware of certain things that can keep us from retaining our teeth our entire lives.

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Judith Ann Jones, DDS, a spokesman on elder care for the American Dental Association and director of The Center for Clinical Research at the Boston University Goldman School of Dental Medicine spoke about 5 things that are especially important to the over 50 crowd.

Tooth Decay:  Contrary to what many people believe, adults keep getting cavities!  I’m always surprised when people are stunned to learn they have a cavity as an adult.  Areas of the teeth that have never had a cavity can decay, but  areas  where we see more problems are where an old filling is leaking and at the base of an older crown.  The best prevention is brushing well each day along the gumline.  An electric toothbrush is very helpful in accomplishing this as well as the use of fluoride.  An over the counter fluoride rinse nightly is great and in our office we have special prescription strength fluoride that is wonderful for cavity prevention as well as help with sensitivity.
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Dry Mouth:  Keeping Your Teeth For a Lifetime We see so many people with this problem.  “Saliva protects our teeth.  The calcium and phosphate present in saliva prevent demineralization of your teeth”, Jones says.  Many drugs cause dry mouth as well as some diseases and as we get older, we are on more medications thus we see this commonly in older adults.  This is a difficult one to deal with for those affected.  The best thing is to drink lots of water, use saliva substitute and try xylitol products.  Also, if you smoke, stop, it just makes your mouth drier.

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Gum Disease:  If your gums are swollen, red, or bleed easily, you have gum disease.  If left untreated, gum disease (gingivitis) will become more serious and will cause deterioration of the bone that holds the teeth, we call this periodontitis.   If this condition continues without treatment, it can cause the loss of the teeth.  The best way to prevent gum disease is to clean your teeth well each day with brushing, flossing, and use of interdental cleaners like soft picks or go betweens. And of course, seeing your friendly dental hygienist as often as recommended.  We can remove the mineralized bacteria from your teeth that you can’t remove with brushing.

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Tooth Crowding:  “As you age, your teeth shift”, according to Lee W. Graber, D.D.S., M.S, Ph.D., Past President of the American Association of Orthodontists. And “that can be problematic, not because you’ll look different, but because it can make your teeth more difficult to clean, leading to more decay.  It’s also of concern because misaligned teeth can lead to teeth erosion and damage to the supporting tissue and bone”, Graber says.   “Add to that the tendency of older adults to have periodontal disease, and you could end up losing your teeth even faster.”   If your teeth have really shifted, and you find you are having a difficult time keeping your teeth clean and food keeps getting caught in certain areas, ask our doctors about orthodontics.  We offer Invisalign to our patients and we’ve had patients in their later years choose to straighten their teeth.  I just finished with my invisalign treatment.  I had braces when I was a teenager but my teeth had shifted and I was experiencing these problems I just mentioned.  I decided to do Invisalign.  It’s easy to do and my teeth are so much straighter.   They are now in the correct alignment and my teeth and gums will be healthier.   If you choose not to do orthodontics, more frequently exams and cleanings may be necessary.

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Oral Cancer:  According to The Oral Cancer Foundation, more than 43,000 Americans will be diagnosed with oral cancers this year, and more than 8,000 will die from it.  “Oral cancer incidence definitely increases as you get older”, Jones says, and “is very often linked to smoking and heavy alcohol use.”   Jones also said, “Only about half of people who develop oral cancer survive the disease.”   If discovered early, there is an 80 percent chance of surviving for five years.  When we do your periodic exams when you come in for your cleaning, you will be checked for oral cancer.  We also offer Velscope, Identafi, or Oral ID technologies to help in finding oral cancer earlier.

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Keep brushing, flossing and smiling!  We want to help you keep your teeth healthy your entire lives!

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Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/09/28/common-dental-problems-_n_5844434.html

https://aga.grandparents.com/

What type of Floss is right for you?

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Andra Mahoney BS RDH 

What type of floss is right for you?

Several months ago, Wendy wrote a great article on the necessity of flossing ( https://dentistrydonedifferently.com/2014/05/19/flossing-do-i-have-to/).  Now that you have accepted that flossing is an integral part of your oral health, let’s pick out the right floss for you! There are a plethora of different types of floss, so you are bound to find the one that fits your wants and needs.

Let’s first examine your basic floss: 

There are two main types of floss: String and Tape.

String is the most common type of floss, and what everyone thinks of when they think floss.

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String floss comes in nylon or polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE).  Nylon floss is the most common string floss.  It comes in all different types of flavors and thicknesses.  It even comes waxed and un-waxed. The wax is added to the floss to help fit through teeth with tight contacts.

PTFE floss is a lot like a plastic string. It is a monofilament, which means it’s not made from multiple fibers so it will not rip, shread, or tear.  PTFE floss is newer and people seem to like it because it is strong!  It also comes in many thicknesses and flavors, though it is not waxed because it is made to glide between teeth.  Because of its strength, I recommend not snapping the floss between your teeth.  It can very easily hurt the gum tissue if it is pulled too hard.

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Dental Tape is becoming more and more common nowadays. It is very similar to, but wider than, string floss.  Many people with sensitive gums like tape floss because they find it more comfortable when flossing below the gum line.  It is also a great “starter” floss because it is thinner than regular nylon floss.

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Advanced Types of Floss:

Spongy or Super Floss is ideal for cleaning braces, bridges, and wide gaps between teeth. Super Floss has three unique components—a stiffened-end dental floss threader, spongy floss, and regular floss—all work together for maximum benefits. It allows you to floss under appliances, cleans around appliances, between wide spaces, and removes plaque under the gumline.

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Floss Threaders come in two different types.  One looks like a large, thin, sewing needle. The plus side of this type of threader is that you can thread any type of floss and pull it through. It makes it easy to use whatever floss you have lying around the house. The down side is you have to thread the floss each time you use it.

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CAN Eez Thru Floss Threaders Demo

A little bit easier is the floss threader that is kind of like a shoe string. It has a built in threader tip attached to the floss, so there is one less step than the other floss threader. Both threaders are great for any appliance: bridges, braces, lingual bars, etc.

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Other Options:

Floss Picks are great for flossing hard to reach spaces or when you’re on the go. You don’t have to be in a bathroom to floss! A few tips to remember, never reuse a floss pick. The plaque bacteria that is removed by the flosser isn’t always seen. You do not want that bacteria to be reintroduced into your mouth. Which brings us to tip two, use four flossers in one flossing session. One for the upper right, upper left, lower left, and lower right (each side is measured from the last molar to the midline between your front teeth). When using standard floss, you use about 18 inches. A flosser has about one inch of floss. You do not want to transfer the bacteria from one side of the mouth to the other. So after you have used one, toss it, and grab another. Flossers are very inexpensive and come in multipacks.

Floss pic

Powered Flossers are very useful for older people who find it hard to manipulate string floss into their mouth. A disposable tip is placed on the end of the powered flosser and when the button is depressed, the floss gently vibrates back and forth. Just place it between your teeth and floss away! As with the floss picks, please do not reuse the disposable ends of the flosser.

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Interproximal brushes are helpful to those who have wider spaces between their teeth. Two options are soft picks, which are like rubber toothpicks.

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And the other interdental brushes are like small pipe cleaners.

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 The difference between the two comes down to preference and how wide the space is between your teeth. Both options come in various sizes. These are also one time use items that come in a pack.

Extra Helpers:

Rubber Tip Simulators are not a type of floss, but they are handy in plaque removal. They are mainly used for cleaning under operculums. An operculum is a small flap of gum tissue. It is usually found in the back of the mouth by the last tooth. It can occur naturally or come about from a tooth that has not fully erupted into the mouth.

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 As seen in the picture, the right side is a normal tooth, and the left has an operculum. Plaque can get under this flap of tissue so it will need to be cleaned. Just take the rubber tip stimulated and swipe gently under the tissue.

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WaterPiks work wonderfully in addition to your floss!  Please remember, do not substitute waterpicks for brushing and flossing. Unlike flossing, waterpicks do not remove plaque. They are effective for people who have orthodontic braces, which may retain food in areas a toothbrush cannot reach, people who catch food between their teeth, or people who are looking for extra help with their gums.

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Brief Overview:

Large gaps between your teeth? Try dental tape or Super Floss.

Not much space between your teeth? You may find that a waxed floss is easier to slide into those tight spaces.

Want less mess? Look for disposable flossers or floss in pre-measured strands.

Braces or bridges? A spongy floss is a good option, but any floss can be used if you have a floss threader.

As you can see there are a lot of options out there! But do not fear! A study from the University of Buffalo stated, “Believe it or not, researchers have compared different types of dental floss to determine whether some are more effective than others to clean teeth. The bottom line is that they are not. Any type of floss will help promote clean teeth by removing food particles and bacteria.”

Just remember that when it comes to dental floss, flossing every day is the most important choice you and your family can make.

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(microscopic image of used dental floss)

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

 

Sources:
http://www.oralb.com/topics/all-floss-types-work-well-when-used-daily.aspx

http://www.oralb.com/topics/choosing-the-best-dental-floss-for-you.aspx

http://www.deltadentalins.com/oral_health/flossing3.html

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/thomas-p-connelly-dds/dental-floss_b_1643933.html

Invisalign

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Amanda Orvis RDH 

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Invisalign is a uniquely designed orthodontic treatment developed to correct mild to severe cases of malocclusion, including crowding, protruding or crooked teeth, overbites and/or underbites. Invisalign is an affordable option for correcting most dental malocclusion problems.

 

WHAT MAKES INVISALIGN DIFFERENT?

 

You may be asking yourself, what is the difference between Invisalign and traditional braces? With Invisalign you can achieve very similar if not the same outcomes as traditional braces. The advantages of Invisalign are the comfort, flexibility, and ease of access to properly care for your teeth without having brackets, wires or rubber bands in your mouth.

invisalign-vs-braces

 

Invisalign uses a series of aligners to straighten your teeth over the course of your treatment. Aligners are smooth plastic trays that you wear over your teeth. Each set of aligners is worn for a few weeks before changing to a new set.

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ADVANTAGES

 

The great thing about Invisalign is that there are no personal sacrifices in terms of food! You do not have to give up popcorn, chips, bagels, pizza crust, pretzels, nuts, apples, carrots, or corn on the cob. Fortunately, Invisalign aligners are removable, therefore allowing you to eat and drink as well as brush and floss your teeth as you would normally do. The aligners are worn for 20-22 hours a day while they gradually move your teeth into their correct positions. The aligners should only be removed to eat as well as brush and floss your teeth.

 

HEALTHIER TEETH AND GUMS

 

Often times crowding or malocclusion issues can lead to swollen, red, bleeding gums. These are signs of periodontal disease. By properly aligning the teeth, inflammation is reduced, allowing your gum tissue to fit properly around the teeth. This provides a defense against potential periodontal problems.

Food debris and plaque build-up can lead to tooth decay. In order to maintain strong healthy teeth, simply remove your aligners and brush and floss as you would normally do. Try to avoid eating and/or drinking while your aligners are in your mouth.

 

THE INVISALIGN PROCESS

  1. Talk to your dentist about your interest in Invisalign.
  2. Your dentist will take impressions and photos and send them off to Invisalign. A customized treatment plan will be created just for you.
  3. After your treatment plan is created, you will then go into your dental office for a brief viewing of a virtual presentation of your anticipated final outcomes.
  4. Upon your approval of your anticipated outcomes, Invisalign then fabricates your series of aligners and sends them to your dental office.
  5. Your dental office will then call you to schedule an appointment for you to come in and receive your first set of aligners.
  6. Over the course of your Invisalign treatment you will change out your aligners every few weeks.
  7. After the completion of all of your aligners, retainers are then made to keep your teeth in their new positions to keep that new smile looking great.

We look forward to helping you create that new smile that you have always wanted.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

 Sources:

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=invisalign+logo&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=McLNU4HYBsyRigKMrYHgBg&sqi=2&ved=0CAYQ_AUoAQ&biw=1455&bih=649&dpr=1.1#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=ppEm1tcLQDsWdM%253A%3BHoiq8xzkzJxlAM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.sleepdentists.com%252Fimages%252FInvisalign.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.sleepdentists.com%252Finvisalign.html%3B1688%3B677

 

http://www.invisalign.com/how-invisalign-works

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=invisalign+vs+braces&tbm=isch&imgil=XUGHWDXfdD2a-M%253A%253Bhttps%253A%252F%252Fencrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com%252Fimages%253Fq%253Dtbn%253AANd9GcRvBYeXNPP9sv-xb4J-Gtrx9qQymztXqkddcgUFH5qLhUDpEOs-Xw%253B620%253B350%253BKd_nANmUSaFf6M%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.masriortho.com%25252Finvisalign-vs-braces&source=iu&usg=__PRQlvmHglFglwqVUOmV6SXSAbUQ%3D&sa=X&ei=8ZysU-6IHImDogSj7ICwAQ&sqi=2&ved=0CFEQ9QEwAg&biw=2133&bih=975&dpr=0.75#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=XUGHWDXfdD2a-M%253A%3BKd_nANmUSaFf6M%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.masriortho.com%252Fwp-content%252Fuploads%252F2013%252F05%252Finvisalign-vs-braces.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.masriortho.com%252Finvisalign-vs-braces%3B620%3B350

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=invisalign+vs+braces&tbm=isch&imgil=XUGHWDXfdD2a-M%253A%253Bhttps%253A%252F%252Fencrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com%252Fimages%253Fq%253Dtbn%253AANd9GcRvBYeXNPP9sv-xb4J-Gtrx9qQymztXqkddcgUFH5qLhUDpEOs-Xw%253B620%253B350%253BKd_nANmUSaFf6M%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.masriortho.com%25252Finvisalign-vs-braces&source=iu&usg=__PRQlvmHglFglwqVUOmV6SXSAbUQ%3D&sa=X&ei=8ZysU-6IHImDogSj7ICwAQ&sqi=2&ved=0CFEQ9QEwAg&biw=2133&bih=975&dpr=0.75#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=JTAejR9TeI5dYM%253A%3BfgICUBiM2Ty84M%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.212smiling.com%252Fwp-content%252Fuploads%252F2013%252F02%252Fbody-1.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.212smiling.com%252Fblog%252F2013%252F03%252Finvisalign-vs-braces-which-option-is-better-for-you%252F%3B607%3B171

Vitamin D and Dental Health

Karen

Karen Kelley RDH

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I recently read two articles, the first by Dr. Richard Kim, a dentist who practices in New York City, and the second on the website doctorshealthpress.com. They both have information from a Boston study about the correlation of Vitamin D and Dental health. I was interested to learn that so many people have a deficiency of Vitamin D and how it can affect dental health.

This is a portion of Dr. Kim’s article:

“Medical researchers have long known that Vitamin D has many oral and overall health benefits, but there is growing concern that deficiency of this critical nutrient is more common than once thought. Understanding the benefits of Vitamin D, where it comes from and who is at risk for deficiency could make an important difference in your general and oral health.

Somewhere along the way you can probably remember being told to have plenty of calcium in your diet to build strong bones and teeth. Fortunately calcium is everywhere – readily available in many of the foods we all love like milk, cheese, ice cream and even commercially added to orange juice, breads and cereals. Perhaps you didn’t know that without Vitamin D, the body can’t absorb that calcium… no matter how much of it you swallow!

A diet lacking or low in vitamin D will contribute to a phenomena known as “ burning mouth syndrome”, symptoms of which can include dry mouth, a burning sensation of the tongue and oral tissues and a metallic or bitter taste. The condition is most common in older adults who, coincidentally, are frequently found to have a Vitamin D deficiency! Oral Health scientists have found that in addition to many general health benefits, Vitamin D helps to reduce inflammation in the body, which is widely known to have a direct impact on the development and severity of periodontal (gum and bone) disease. As a matter of fact, according to a study published in the Journal of Dentistry (1) among 6700 research participants, those who had the highest blood levels of Vitamin D were about 20% less likely to have gum disease.

Vitamin D is produced naturally by the human body when skin is exposed to sunlight, but more often than not people choose to protect themselves from the harmful effects of ultraviolet rays. Sunscreen and protective clothing may prevent getting enough vitamin D from the sun; and deficiency is common among people who live in northern latitudes or other areas that receive limited sunlight. Up to 50% of older adults have inadequate Vitamin D levels, perhaps partly due to decreased outdoor activity and sun exposure.

Although it is a rule of thumb that the best source of nutrients is a natural one, Vitamin D supplements are readily available over the counter and routinely recommended to individuals at risk for deficiency. Do you have unexplained body or mouth symptoms? Could you be at risk … or have you been recently diagnosed with low Vitamin D levels? Your doctor and dental professional can advise you about the benefits of a supplement, and a recent discovery of Vitamin D deficiency is a good reason to schedule your regular dental checkup.

1. Journal of Dentistry (2005), 33:703–10.”

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From the doctorshealthpress site:

Vitamin D isn’t just for your bones anymore.

This versatile vitamin is now showing promise in the fight against gum disease as well. According to a new study, vitamin D has both anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. (This means that it can reduce inflammation and boost your body’s ability to fight off infections.) It appears that people who have more vitamin D in their bodies run a lower risk of contracting gum disease.

The Boston-based study looked at 6,700 people who had never smoked before. They examined the gums and teeth of these people and compared their vitamin D status to the health and inflammation of their gums. Adjusting for age, previous dental work, dental hygiene, and other factors, it was found that people who had a higher intake of vitamin D also had overall healthier gums.

In fact, those who had the highest levels of the vitamin in their body reduced their risk of bleeding during oral examination by 20% when compared to patients who had the lowest intake of vitamin D.

So, if you thought this power-packed vitamin was only good for helping your bones, you were wrong. The evidence speaks for itself — vitamin D plays a double role. It acts as an anti-inflammatory and it may just help you walk out of your next dental appointment with less pain and bleeding.

So ensure that you allow your body to produce enough vitamin D. It’s a good reason to get just a few minutes of sun at least three times a week. Make sure you don’t overdo it, unless you are wearing sunscreen. If you can’t get outside, at least try taking a supplement in order to help you get all you need of this wonderful nutrient.

http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/food-and-nutrition-articles/vitamin-d-is-good-for-your-gums-too

After reading these articles, I started doing some of my own ‘research’. I began asking my patients who generally had good overall brushing and flossing habits, not stellar, but good, who’s gums generally looked healthy, but when I was scaling (cleaning) their teeth, they bled more than they should if their gums were truly healthy. (Healthy gums shouldn’t bleed!) Most of the patients that I asked told me they had been diagnosed with low Vitamin D levels! This was very interesting to me. I did some other reading about Vitamin D deficiency and found how common it is. It’s interesting to me that anyone living in the “Valley of the Sun” could be deficient in Vitamin D, but it actually is common.

I also found this article on Web MD entitled:

Keep That Smile! Calcium and Vitamin D Prevent Tooth Loss

“If you’re supplementing your diet with calcium and vitamin D to prevent bone loss, you may be more likely to hang onto your pearly whites, according to a report at this week’s meeting of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research in Toronto. Even so, older adults need to floss their teeth and see the dentist regularly because with increased age come increased risks for losing teeth.

“Studies have shown that calcium and vitamin D decrease bone loss in the hip and forearm, but we weren’t sure if they had an effect on tooth loss,” says lead author Elizabeth Krall, MPH, PhD, a researcher at Boston University Dental School and Tufts University Nutrition Research Center. “Now we know that supplementation may also improve tooth retention, along with routine dental care and good oral hygiene,” she tells WebMD. To explore the role of supplementation on tooth retention, the researchers followed more than 140 older adults for five years. Participants took either a placebo or 500 mg of calcium plus 700 units of vitamin D daily for three years. Both during and after the trial, their teeth were examined periodically. For those who took supplements, the likelihood of losing one or more teeth was 40% less, even two years later.” ( http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/news/20000927/keep-that-smile-calcium vitamin-d-prevent-tooth-loss)

Anything that gives our patients a 40% less chance of losing a tooth and 20% less gums disease and bleeding during their dental visits is certainly worth looking into further. If a person is low in Vitamin D, it is an easy thing to implement a supplement or sun into a daily routine. The National Institute of Health recommends 10 to 15 minutes of outdoor activity two times a week to get enough Vitamin D. They also suggest for areas where they don’t have as much sun as we do, that vitamin D can be received by consuming milk, eggs, and fish. The Vitamin Council gives further instructions to individuals with periodontal (gum) disease. The Council says for someone with gum disease they may want to consider taking measures to raise their vitamin D blood levels to 40 ng/mL (100 nmol/L). They also suggest moderate UVB exposure (without sunburn) but additionally recommend oral intake of vitamin D and calcium supplements.

If you’re over 50 and have some symptoms of gum disease, ask your MD what your Vitamin D levels are now (they can do a simple blood test) and what you should be doing to raise your Vitamin D to an acceptable level.

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Keep smiling, Karen Kelley R.D.H.

 

 

Sources:

http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/health-conditions/periodontal-disease/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3768179/

http://www.easy-immune-health.com/Vitamin-D-and-Teeth.html

http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/food-and-nutrition-articles/vitamin-d-is-good-for-your-gums-too

http://nydentallife.wordpress.com/author/nydentallife/

Photos:

www.hayleyhobsonblog.com

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