Dental “Myth Busters”

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Becky Larson, RDH

Dental “Myth Busters”

There are a lot of dental myths out there that are sometimes mistaken for dental truths.  Here are a few facts to help clear up some of the confusion.

Myth #1: You don’t need to brush baby teeth because they will fall out eventually anyway. 

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Absolutely not!  Baby teeth can still get cavities, which can spread to other teeth and cause pain.  Some baby teeth may even fall out too soon and cause problems with bite or improper development of a child’s permanent teeth.  It’s also important to establish good oral hygiene habits early on.  Children’s teeth should be brushed twice daily (just like adult teeth).

Myth #2: Fluoride is poisonous and should be avoided. 

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Wrong!  Each day the enamel layers of our teeth lose minerals (demineralization) due to the acidity of plaque and sugars in the mouth.  The enamel is remineralized from food and water consumption.  Too much demineralization without enough remineralization leads to tooth decay.  Fluoride helps strengthen enamel, thus making it more resistant to acidic demineralization.  Fluoride can sometimes reverse early tooth decay.  According to the American Dental Association, community water fluoridation is the single more effective public health measure to prevent tooth decay.  Many dental offices also offer in office fluoride treatments that can help both children and adults.

Myth #3:  You lose one tooth each time you have a child.

Missing Tooth

Now that’s just silly.  Some women think that when they are pregnant the baby leeches a lot of their calcium supply.  That may be, but it doesn’t mean she will lose any teeth.  However, pregnant women are prone to cavities or having other dental problems.  This is due to morning sickness and vomiting, dry mouth, and a desire/craving for more sugary or starchy foods.  Pregnant women in these circumstances should be sure to continue their regular dental check-ups and try to maintain pristine oral home care.

Myth #4:  If your gums are bleeding you should avoid brushing your teeth and flossing.

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I can’t even begin to stress how wrong this one is!  If your gums are bleeding it means there is active inflammation and infection present.  That means you need to improve on oral hygiene by brushing more frequently or more effectively.  Bleeding gums is a sign of periodontal disease.  If caught early (in the gingivitis stage) it can be reversed.  Brushing should be done twice daily with a soft-bristled toothbrush.  Flossing should be done at least once daily.

Myth #5:  Placing a tablet of aspirin beside an aching tooth can ease the pain.

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Wrong again.  In order to ease the pain caused by a toothache, aspirin must be fully swallowed.  Placing aspirin on gum tissue for long periods of time can actually damage the tissue and possibly cause an abscess.

Myth #6:  You don’t need to see the dentist if there is no visible problem with your teeth.

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Unfortunately not all dental problems will be visible or obvious.  You should continue to visit the dentist for regular check-ups at least twice per year, in conjunction with your cleanings.  Dental radiographs or other instruments can detect cavities or other problems that might not be causing any symptoms yet.  It’s best to catch things early to minimize the treatment needed.

Myth #7:  After a tooth has been treated for decay it will not decay again.

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There are no guarantees in dentistry!  While the dentist will do their best to restore teeth to last for as long as possible, there is no way of knowing when or if a tooth will get recurrent decay.  Proper oral home care can prolong the life of dental restorations.

Don’t always believe what you hear!  If you have questions or concerns about your dental health be sure to ask your dentist, hygienist, or other dental professional.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

 

Sources:

http://www.ada.org/en/public-programs/advocating-for-the-public/fluoride-and-fluoridation

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/fluoride-treatment

http://www.livescience.com/22463-gain-a-child-lose-a-tooth-myth-or-reality.html

http://tips4dentalcare.com/2008/06/21/popular-myths-about-dentistry/

Essential Oils

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Lora Cook RDH

     Recently several of my patients have asked me some questions about essential oils. To be honest I have a very limited knowledge of the subject. I hate when I don’t have all the answers for my patients. So I thought what better way to learn more about the subject then to write about it.

    However, let me preface this information with a reminder that while these essential oils can provide effective preventive and palliative care, it is not a substitute for dental care. If you have a cavity or a toothache please do not hesitate to give us a call. Periodontal disease and cavities left untreated will only become worse over time.

     As dental professionals we rely on tested clinical research and published research studies wither certain guidelines to substantiate any therapeutic claims and demonstrate effectiveness. However with essential oils there is little published research, because several problems present in trying to conduct research on essential oils. First, essential oils are not standardized. Synthetic Pharmaceuticals are reproduced to be identical, where as essential oils cannot be produced to be identical. Second, while conducting research on essential oils it is difficult to gage for individual differences in how the oils affect people. Also little funding is provided for research on homeopathic remedies. More research studies are done for synthetic therapeutics because these follow the usual scientific research path.

The Essential oils that I would like to talk about are:

  1. Cinnamon oil: bark and leaf
  2. Tea Tree oil
  3. Myrrh
  4. Clove oil
  5. Peppermint oil

1. Cinnamon:

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risdoninternational.com

  • Leaf oil is primarily useful for palliative care. It may be effective in reducing pain and inflammation.
  •  Cinnamon Bark Oil has antibacterial qualities, it has been shown to effectively destroy 21 different types of bacteria.
  • How to use: You can rinse with diluted cinnamon oil after brushing, or put some on your tooth paste. Cinnamon oil is very strong and should not be ingested. Also some people have been known to have allergic reactions to cinnamon oil, so test in a small area of your mouth first.

2. Tea Tree Oil: This oil is effective for antibacterial, anti-fungal, and antiviral properties.

  • If you have a allergy to celery or thyme, you should not use this oil. Also just like the cinnamon oil, tea tree oil is very strong and should not be ingested.
  • How to use: There are wooded toothpicks that have been impregnated with tea tree oil. These can be found at a health food store, or purchased on-line. You can also mix a small amount with your toothpaste, then brush.

3. Myrrh: This is effective for mouth sores.

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doterrablog.com

  • How to use: Mix 1 to 2 drops in eight ounce glass of warm water, swish for thirty seconds then spit.

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http://www.mountainroseherbs.com

4. Clove Oil: This is effective for toothaches, also known to sooth sore gums.

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libweb5.princeton.edu

  • How to use: Mix one drop with a plant based carrier oil, olive oil wood be a good carrier oil to use. Then apply with a cotton swab. For gum tissue and other oral tissues mix 1 to 2 drops in eight ounce glass of warm water, swish for thirty seconds then spit.

5. Peppermint Oil: This oil is effective in treating bad breath, it also has mild anesthetic properties.

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www.lalaessentialoils.com

  • How to use: Mix two drops of peppermint oil with two cups of distilled water. Shake we’ll before each use, swish a mouthful for one minute then spit. All essential oils should not be ingested, and always consult your medical physician before starting any type of therapy at home.

There are other essential oils that are effective for oral health that I did not include in this overview: basil, almond and lavender, just to name a few.  I hope that these basic guidelines can shed a bit more light on the subject.  All essential oils should not be ingested, and always consult your medical physician before starting any type of therapy at home.

Sources:

http://www.livestrong.com/article/284574-cinnamon-oil-for-cavities/

http://www.teatree.co.il/en/Files/oral.pdf

http://www.intelligentdental.com/2010/11/30/how-to-use-tea-tree-oil-for-dental-health/

http://birchhillhappenings.com/mouth.htm