Christmas Stocking Stuffers

Sharma RDH

Sharma Mulqueen, RDH

 

Christmas Stocking Stuffers

Christmas is the topic of mostly everyone this time of year.  So many of us love to see what Santa has left for us in our stockings.  When considering stocking stuffers, we have some recommendations to assist in keeping your child’s mouth and teeth at their healthiest.

When parents start thinking of what to place in their child’s stocking, they rarely think to put items that will benefit dental health.  Most parents fill their children’s stockings with candy, nuts, socks, hair bows, lotion or Chap Stick.  The list can be endless with what is placed in stockings.  So this year, why not give them items to help with their dental home care.

A New Toothbrush

Everyone loves a new toothbrush.  For the holidays, pick one that will get your kids excited about brushing their teeth.  There are character brushes, brushes that light up and even brushes that play music while you clean your teeth!  Be sure to choose a soft-bristled brush with the appropriate sized head for smaller mouths.

A Tooth Timer

If brushing the correct amount of time is difficult for your kids, consider getting a small timer to keep in the bathroom.  Most kids brush an average of 14 seconds but in their minds it was for two minutes.  A timer will insure that your child is brushing for the approiate time.   You can even join them by brushing together to make sure the family is brushing for two minutes.

A Fun Toothpaste Flavor

So many people choose mint or bubble gum for their toothpaste flavor.  You can look online and find some fun flavors.  Try giving your kids something silly that you wouldn’t usually pick.  There’s Bacon, Pickle, Cupcake, Oreo, Vanilla and Orange.  The list keeps growing.  Amazon has some great choices.

Flavored Floss

Floss is normally pretty plain, but it doesn’t have to be.  Like toothpaste, there is bacon, cupcake or pickled-flavored floss to match.  If those flavors don’t do the trick, there are banana and cinnamon-flavored options for kids to enjoy.

Sugar-Free Chewing Gum with Xylitol

Did you know that chewing gum can actually be good for your teeth? While not a substitute for brushing, sugar-free gum can help in the production of saliva which washes away trapped food particles.  Further, gum containing xylitol has actually been proven to help reduce cavities.

Holidays are such a special time to share with your family and friend’s.  Signature Dental would like to wish you all a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

http://www.xlear.com

http://www.colgate.com

http://www.oralanswers.com

Basic Tongue Problems

AnnC

Ann Clark, RDH

Basic Tongue Problems

The tongue is often known as the “strongest muscle in the body”.  It is made up of a group of muscles and allows us to swallow, talk, taste, and clean the mouth.  A healthy tongue is pink and covered with small bumps we call taste buds or papillae.

When your tongue experiences soreness or discoloration it can be frustrating due to its constant use.  The majority of tongue problems are not serious and most can be cared for quickly; however, sometimes a discolored or painful tongue can be something more serious like a vitamin deficiency, oral cancer, or AIDS.  Any persisting concerns should have medical advice.

White tongue:
-Leukoplakia: this condition causes excessive cell growth in the mouth causing white patches to grow.  Although not always dangerous they can be a precursor to cancer so let your dentist be the judge.  It can develop from irritation and is more often found in those using tobacco products.
-Oral thrush: also known as candidiasis.  This is a yeast infection of the mouth.  It shows up as white patches like cottage-cheese.  It is more common in infants and the elderly, especially denture wearers or those with weakened immune systems.  Medical conditions like diabetes, or inhaled steroids for asthma or lung disease can increase your risk.  Antibiotics can kill off “good” bacteria resulting in this condition.  Eating plain yogurt and medications can combat this infection.
-Oral lichen planus: this manifests itself as lacey-white lines on your tongue.  Although hard to determine the cause, it often resolves on its own.  Keeping up good hygiene and avoiding tobacco can help the healing process.
Other Conditions: 
-Scarlet fever: contact a doctor if you have a red tongue along side a high fever.  An antibiotic is necessary for this condition.
-Geographic tongue: this is known dentally as benign migratory glossitis and looks like a map pattern of reddish spots with a white border;  their location often shifts.  They are usually harmless and acidic foods can often sting.  If discomfort persists you can be prescribed a topical medication.
-Red or strawberry tongue: many factors can cause a normally pink tongue to turn red or even look strawberry-like with enlarged, red taste buds.  Vitamin deficiencies like B12 and folic acid can cause such an appearance.
-Black hairy tongue: although this looks scary it is typically non-serious.  The small bumps on your tongue grow continually in your lifetime and in some people become excessively long, making it easier to harbor bacteria and cause a dark “hair-like” appearance to form.  This is more commonly found in those with poor hygiene, individuals on antibiotics or chemotherapy and those with diabetes.
-Sore or bumpy tongue:
*Trauma can usually occur from biting or burning your tongue. Grinding and clenching can irritate the sides
your tongue.
*Canker sores or ulcers cause soreness.  Their cause is unknown but stress can aid their development.
*Burning tongue syndrome can occur in post menopausal women.
*Smoking is an irritant to the tongue manifesting in soreness.
*Medical conditions like diabetes and anemia can result with a sore tongue.
*Enlarged papillae can result from irritated taste buds.
*Oral cancer- a spot that doesn’t resolve in a 2 week period needs to be checked.  Many oral cancers do not
hurt in the early stages so don’t assume a lack of pain means you are okay.

Please consult your friendly dental office for an evaluation if any of these conditions arise.  It’s better to be safe.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:
http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/tongue-problem-basics-sore-or-discolored-tongue-and-tongue-bumps?page=3
University of Maryland Medical Center: “Tongue Problems”
University of Maryland Medical Center: “Oral Cancer”
American Dental Association: “Common Mouth Sores”
Familydoctor.org: “Mouth Problems”
Familydoctor.org “Canker Sores:  What they are and what you can do about them”
Columbia University College of Dental Medicine:  “Black Hairy Tongue”
Columbia University College of Dental Medicine:  “Painful Papillae of the Tongue”

Oral Parafunctional Habits

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Becky Larson, RDH

Oral Parafunctional Habits

We all need to move our jaw and teeth to do normal everyday activities such eating, talking, and breathing.  However, some individuals use their teeth and/or jaw for other purposes, which are not considered normal activities.  A para-functional habit is the habitual exercise of a body part in a way other than the most common use of that body part.  Some oral para-functional habits include clenching or grinding the teeth (bruxism), tongue thrusting, and thumb sucking.  Oral para-functional habits can cause problems with the teeth and/or jaw and should be addressed as soon as they are discovered.

Clenching or grinding of the teeth is referred to as bruxism.  Teeth are meant to clench and grind during the process of mastication (eating) but not in the absence of food.  Occasional teeth grinding doesn’t usually cause harm.  However, grinding on a regular basis can cause extensive damage to the teeth as well as other oral health complications.  Grinding can be caused by stress and anxiety but occurs most often during sleep.  Because of this, most people are unaware they grind their teeth.  Symptoms of bruxism include a dull, constant headache and/or a sore jaw upon waking up.  Usually a spouse or loved one will also hear the grinding at night.   Your dentist can examine your teeth and jaw for signs of bruxism.  Chronic teeth grinding can result in tooth fractures, loosening of the teeth, tooth loss, or teeth worn down to stumps.  In these cases the dentist may place bridges, crowns, implants or perform root canals.  Severe grinding can cause pain in the temporomandibular joint (jaw joint).  Wearing a mouth guard while you sleep can prevent excessive wear on the teeth.  Having a custom fit mouth guard is the best option as it is made from impressions your own teeth.  While a mouth guard does not stop the clenching and grinding from happening, it prevents wear on the teeth by putting a barrier between the biting surfaces of the teeth.  Usually mouth guards will last a few years before needing to be replaced.

Tongue thrusting is where the tongue protrudes near or through the front teeth during swallowing, speech, or while the tongue is at rest.  The correct position of the tongue should be on the roof of the mouth (or palate) when swallowing.  Symptoms of tongue thrusting include:

  • Dental malocclusion (teeth don’t align correctly)
  • Poor facial development
  • Mouth breathing
  • Periodontal problems
  • Other oral para-functional habits (bruxism and/or thumb sucking)
  • Drooling
  • Limited tolerance to food textures or limited diet
  • Difficulty swallowing pills
  • High palatal arch

Tongue thrusting can also be related to thumb sucking.  Children often begin sucking thumbs or fingers at an early age.  It is a reflex that provides comfort and relaxation and as such, many children practice this habit while sleeping.  While this habit is generally stopped around 2-4 years of age, some children continue thumb or finger sucking into elementary school.  Most dentists will advise to break this habit before permanent teeth begin to erupt.  Pacifiers are great substitutes for thumbs and fingers because they can be taken away at the necessary time.  Both tongue thrusting and thumb sucking can be detrimental to the development of facial structures, jaw and teeth.

Please talk with your dentist if you are experiencing problems with any of these para-functional habits.  He or she can recommend treatment to help prevent un-necessary tooth damage.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/parafunction

http://orthowny.com/parafunctional_habits/

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/teeth-grinding-bruxism#1

http://tonguethrust.weebly.com/

Cold Sores

LindsayW

Cold Sores

Essential Oils

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Lora Cook, RDH

Essential Oils

Recently several of my patients have asked me some questions about essential oils.  To be honest I have a very limited knowledge of the subject.  I hate when I don’t have all the answers for my patients.  So I thought what better way to learn more about the subject then to write about it.  However, let me preface this information with a reminder that while these essential oils can provide effective preventive and palliative care, it is not a substitute for dental care.  If you have a cavity or a toothache please do not hesitate to give us a call. Periodontal disease and cavities left untreated will only become worse over time.

As dental professionals we rely on tested clinical research and published blinded research studies to substantiate any therapeutic claims and demonstrate effectiveness.  However with essential oils there is little published research, because several problems present in trying to conduct research on essential oils.  First, essential oils are not standardized.  Synthetic Pharmaceuticals are reproduced to be identical, where as essential oils cannot be produced to be identical.  Second, while conducting research on essential oils it is difficult to gage for individual differences in how the oils affect people. Also little funding is provided for research on homeopathic remedies.  More research studies are done for synthetic therapeutics because these follow the usual scientific research path.

The Essential oils that I would like to talk about are:

1.)  Cinnamon oil

A.) Cinnamon bark oil

B.) Cinnamon leaf oil

2.)Tea Tree oil

3.)Myrrh

4.)Clove oil

5.)Peppermint oil

 

1.  Cinnamon Leaf Oil:  Leaf oil is primarily useful for palliative care.  It may be effective in reducing pain and inflammation

Cinnamon Bark Oil:  bark oil has antibacterial qualities, has been shown to effectively destroy 21 different types of bacteria.

How to use: You can rinse with diluted cinnamon oil after brushing, or put some on your tooth paste.  Cinnamon oil is very strong and should not be ingested.  Also some people  have been known to have allergic reactions to cinnamon oil, so test in a small area of your mouth first.

2.  Tea Tree Oil:  This oil is effective for antibacterial, anti-fungal, and antiviral properties.

If you have a allergy to celery or thyme, you should not use this oil.  Also just like the cinnamon oil, tea tree oil is very strong and should not be ingested.

How to use: There are wooded toothpicks that have been impregnated with tea tree oil. These can be found at a health food store, or purchased on-line.  You can also mix a small amount with your toothpaste, then brush.

3.  Myrrh:  This is effective for mouth sores.

How to use:  Mix 1 to 2 drops in eight ounce glass of warm water, swish for thirty seconds then spit.

4.  Clove Oil:  This is effective for toothaches, also known to sooth sore gums.

How to use:  Mix one drop with a plant based carrier oil, olive oil wood be a good carrier oil to use.  Then apply with a cotton swab.

For gum tissue and other oral tissues mix 1 to 2 drops in eight ounce glass of warm water, swish for thirty seconds then spit.

5.  Peppermint Oil: This oil is effective in treating bad breath, it also has mild anesthetic properties.

How to use:  Mix two drops of peppermint oil with two cups of distilled water.  Shake we’ll before each use, swish a mouthful for one minute then spit.

There are other essential oils that are effective for oral health that I did not include in this overview: basil, almond, and lavender, just to name a few.  I hope that these basic guidelines can shed a bit more light on the subject.  All essential oils should not be ingested, and always consult your medical physician before starting any type of therapy at home.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

http://www.livestrong.com/article/284574-cinnamon-oil-for-cavities/

http://www.teatree.co.il/en/Files/oral.pdf

http://www.intelligentdental.com/2010/11/30/how-to-use-tea-tree-oil-for-dental-health/

http://birchhillhappenings.com/mouth.htm

http://www.aromaweb.com/essential-oils/myrrh-oil.asp

Dentures and Partial Dentures

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Amanda Orvis, RDH

Dentures and Partial Dentures

Removable dental appliances such as dentures and partial dentures require daily care as well as regular dental visits to keep them functioning properly. Denture and partial denture wearers need to pay close attention to the health of their mouths. Mouths should be brushed with a soft-bristled toothbrush at least twice a day, with or without teeth present. Partial denture wearers should pay close attention to the remaining teeth that their partials fit on to. Plaque and food debris can become trapped on or near the clasps that keep the dentures in place, and that plaque can lead to tooth decay or other dental issues.

Caring for Dentures or Partial Dentures

  • Remove and rinse dentures or partials after eating.
  • Rinse your mouth after removing your dentures.
  • Gently clean your dentures or partials at least once a day using a non-abrasive denture cleaner or mild dish soap. Avoid using toothpaste on your dentures as they are too abrasive and can cause small imperfections in your denture that can trap plaque and bacteria.
  • Soak your dentures overnight to keep them moist and to retain their correct shape. Always follow the instructions on the soaking solutions.
  • Always rinse your dentures after soaking them before putting them back into your mouth.
  • Maintain regular dental visits. Talk with your dentist or dental hygienist about the proper interval for your dental visits.

If you have any questions or concerns about your dentures or partial dentures, please call our office and schedule an appointment.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Gotta Have a Soda?

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Wendy Parker, RDH

Gotta Have a Soda? 

            It’s summertime, the heat is in the air, the pool is inviting, and you have a drink of soda in your hand.  It’s hard not to when it is so available and so tempting everywhere you go!  Last year, my son and I made a New Year’s Resolution to go a whole year without soda.  And let me tell you, it was no easy task!  I can’t tell you how many times we ate pizza and my son and I had lemonade or water instead of a root beer.  Or how many times we went to the movies and remembered not to order a drink, and got a bottle of water instead. It was definitely a change in our habit, but after a while it became easier and easier not to have a Thirstbuster and to reach for water instead of a soda.

With that said, I always knew that sodas aren’t good for you, but after doing some research, I found this handy dandy little sheet that listed some of our family’s favorite drinks and their acidity levels.  Keep in mind that neutral levels are at a 7.0, and acidic levels are lower than that.  Your body, in order to function properly, and to avoid enamel damage in the mouth, needs to remain close to a neutral level as possible.

Acidity (pH scale) of Common Drinks

The pH scale measures the acidity of a solution. The lower the pH, the stronger the acid.   The stronger the acid, the more damage that is done to your child’s teeth.

Therefore, the drinks are listed from best to worst.

Drink Name                                     pH                                Sugar Content

Unsweetened Tea                                            7.2                                          0

Water                                                                     7.0 (neutral)                         0

Milk (2% of skim)                                            6.8                                          3.5

Instant Coffee (black)                                    5.5                                          0

Root Beer                                                             4.6                                          10.7

Diet Root Beer                                                   4.6                                          0

Tomato Juice                                                     4.5                                          4.2

7-Up/Sprite                                                        3.7                                          9

Juicy Juice                                                          3.5                                          4.6

Apple Juice                                                         3.4                                          4.8

Diet Cola                                                              3.4                                          0

Orange Juice                                                      3.3                                          6.3

Minute Maid                                                       3.2                                          11.9

Mountain Dew                                                  3.2                                          46

Snapple                                                                 3.2                                          7.6

Propel                                                                    3.2                                          0.4

V-8                                                                          3.1                                          5.5

Sierra Mist                                                           3                                              5

Kool-Aid Jammers                                          3                                              5.1

Gatorade                                                              2.9                                          21

Dr. Pepper                                                          2.9                                          40.5

Hawaiian Punch                                              2.8                                          10.2

Powerade                                                            2.7                                          15

Hi-C                                                                       2.7                                          5.5

Coke                                                                      2.5                                          27

Country Time Lemonade                            2.5                                          5.4

Pepsi                                                                      2.4                                          27

Sunny Delight                                                   2.4                                          6.3

Battery Acid*                                                      1

*Please do not drink battery acid, this was just added to the list to show scale of acidity

So, hopefully, next time you reach for a soda, I hope you remember this chart and for every can of soda you drink, you have to drink 32 oz. of water to neutralize the acid in your body!

Happy Drinking everyone!

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

http://www.kidsdentistdrwinn.com/clientuploads/PDFs/Acidity%20Sheet%20Sheet1.pdf

What is Xylitol?

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Andra Mahoney, BS RDH

What is Xylitol?

What if I told you there was a sugar that actually prevents cavities?  Would you believe me?  Well, you should!  And it called Xylitol (pronounced zai-li-tall).

What is Xylitol?

Xylitol is a naturally occurring sweetener found in plants, fruits, and vegetables.  It looks and tastes just like sugar (sucrose).  Xylitol has about a third the calories as table sugar, and is a healthy alternative for diabetics. Not only does it make an excellent sugar substitute, but it aids in the prevention of dental caries, and reduces plaque formation.

How does it help prevent cavities?

Everyone has bacteria in their mouth all the time.  Bacteria is highly attracted to the sugars found in the foods and beverages that we eat and drink.  Most people think this means sweets, candies, etc.  While that is true, it also can mean carbohydrates (which are complex sugars) or fruit (which has fructose, a sugar) or any number of things.  The bacteria in our mouths eat all those sugars and excrete acid.  That acid is what causes cavities.

Now bacteria is way more attracted to xylitol than regular sugar.  The Bacteria head right for xylitol!  But bacteria cannot break down xylitol.  Meaning if they can’t “eat” it, they can’t excrete it.  The bacteria dies not able to make acid to cause cavities.  That is how xylitol can help prevent cavities!

How does it help dry mouth?

Many things, including prescription medications, can cause dry mouth.  But why is dry mouth such a big deal?  Dry mouth can effect you quality of life!  It decreases your ability to taste.  It can cause bad breathe.  It can make eating difficult.  It can make talking difficult.  It can even significantly increase your susceptibility to getting cavities!

Xylitol has a cooling effect, quenching the burning of dry mouth.  Xylitol also stimulates saliva flow, which fixes all of the problems previously mentioned.  Xylitol is also an humectant, which means it attracts moisture.  And Xylitol neutralized saliva’s pH.  An acid pH leads to dry mouth, a basic pH can lead to an overgrowth of plaque bacteria.  Nice neutral pH is where your mouth is the happiest!

Who can have Xylitol?

Xylitol is safe for all ages!  Great for the whole family!

Even diabetics can use xylitol.  “The body does not require insulin to metabolize xylitol. For this reason polyols like xylitol produce a lower glycemic response than sucrose or glucose. This has made xylitol a widely used sweetener for the diabetic diet in some countries. If you do have diabetes, however, it’s important to consult your doctor or diet professional before incorporating xylitol into your daily diet. (1)”

And, like chocolate, onions, raisins, or avocados, xylitol is not safe for our 4-legged furry family members.  Please do not share it with them.

Where can you find Xylitol?

Xylitol can be found in a wide array of products.  Most commonly, chewing gum, candies, and mints.  It is also found in tooth pastes, mouth sprays, and even as granulated crystals to replace table sugar.

Hope this has been informative and you have found a new way to incorporate the many benefits of Xylitol in your life!

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

http://www.xylitol.org

http://www.xlear.com

Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy

KatieM

Katie Moynihan, BS RDH

Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy

If your hands bled when you washed them, you would be concerned. However, many people think it is normal if their gums bleed when they brush or floss. False! Inflammation and bleeding are early signs that your gums are infected with bacteria. If not treated quickly and properly, those early signs of gingivitis may lead to a more serious infection called periodontal disease.

Periodontal disease affects the supporting tissues around the teeth including the gums, the periodontal ligament, and the bone. As the plaque in your mouth spreads and accumulates below the gum line, the toxins within that plaque infect and break down the “foundation” that hold your teeth in place. If not treated with periodontal therapy, the disease will only get worse and tooth loss may occur.

In the presence of periodontal disease, a “regular” prophylaxis cleaning can NOT be completed. The definition of prophylaxis is the prevention of disease. Once periodontal disease is diagnosed, your dentist and dental hygienist will recommend non-surgical periodontal therapy. Non-surgical periodontal therapy is also referred to as scaling and root planing, or a deep cleaning. Scaling and root planing involves thoroughly removing the plaque and calculus (tartar) that resides above and below the compromised gums. Smoothing the tooth roots allows a clean surface for tissue re-attachment and pocket reduction. Local anesthetic is recommended to make this procedure comfortable and painless for the patient. The goal for non-surgical periodontal therapy is to treat and eliminate the active infection, reduce periodontal pocketing around teeth, prevent further bone loss. The shallower the pockets are around your teeth, the easier they are to keep clean and healthy! When periodontal health is achieved, your oral health care provider will recommended more frequent periodontal maintenance cleanings every 3-4 months to keep tissues healthy and stabilized. In few circumstances where periodontal health cannot be achieved, a referral to a Periodontist may be recommended for further treatment.

Signs & Symptoms of Gum Disease:

  • Swollen, red, tender or bleeding gums
  • Gums that recede or move away from the tooth
  • Persistent bad breath or bad taste in mouth
  • Pain/sensitivity when chewing
  • Loose teeth
  • Visible pus surrounding the teeth and gums

You can prevent periodontal disease by practicing good oral hygiene and visiting your dentist regularly for professional cleanings. In recent years, gum disease has been linked to overall health problems. You can read more about those on Andra’s recent blog post Oral Health: A Window to your Overall Health! Remember, taking care of your oral health is an investment in your overall health.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

www.perio.org

www.colgate.com

What is Calculus?

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Lora Cook, RDH

What is calculus and what dangers does it cause to the health of your mouth.

Calculus or tartar, same thing is calcified plaque.  Plaque is the soft sticky film that will start to form twenty minutes after you brush your teeth.  Another name for the soft sticky plaque is biofilm.  This is basically a bacteria that grows in your mouth, a “slime layer”.  Plaque is white or pale yellow soft, sticky, slimy stuff.  This is what makes your teeth feel “fuzzy” when you first wake up and at the end of a long day.  So do all these pleasant descriptions make you want to go brush your teeth yet?

So where does calculus come from?  Calculus is calcified plaque.  When plaque is allowed to stay hiding in your mouth for twenty-four hours or more is has the opportunity to harden and turn into tartar. Calculus/Tartar, same thing, this is calcified plaque. Once this soft sticky substance (biofilm) becomes hard it will attach itself to the tooth surface, then you will not be able to remove it yourself with your tooth brush or your floss. Calculus will form above and below your gum tissue.

The calculus will be a physical irritant to your gum tissue, causing inflammation.  The calculus also becomes a source that harbors bacteria that causes harm to the tissue and bone around the teeth.  This aggressive bacteria may lead to periodontal disease. What is periodontal disease?  In short, it is bone loss around the teeth.  This bone loss may range from slight to moderate, to severe.  Some people will build up tartar more quickly than others, and some people are more prone to the bacteria that causes periodontal disease (bone loss).

So this brings the questions; What can I do to prevent calculus build up?

USE AN ELECTRIC TOOTHBRUSH: electric tooth brushes have been proven to be more effective at cleaning than manual brushes. Use the rechargeable electric brushes, not the battery spin brushes.

CHANGE YOUR TOOTHBRUSH EVERY THREE MONTHS: Do not go longer than three months with the same tooth brush or tooth brush head.  Once the bristles start to wear out they cannot do a good job for you.

TIME YOUR BRUSHING ROUTINE: Brush for at least two minutes, preferably two to three minutes.  Sometimes just adding more time to your routine can make a big difference, most people will brush for only forty to sixty seconds. So try timing yourself, you will be surprised.  Two minutes feels like forever when you are brushing.

FLOSS DAILY: You don’t have to floss two times daily, once a day is sufficient. Make flossing part of your nightly routine.  Flossing techniques are important, because some techniques are more effective than others. It is important to floss under the gum tissue where everything likes to hide, not just in between the teeth.

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http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/conditions/plaque-and-tartar

https://www.quora.com/Does-tartar-cause-gum-disease-purely-through-MECHANICAL-means/